Pollination
What is pollination?
This is the transfer of pollen from stamen to stigma.
Pollen grains are transferred or carried by ins...
Transfer of pollen grains
Types of Pollination
• Cross pollination- the transfer of pollen from the male
reproductive organ (anther) of one plant to...
Agents of pollination
Insect pollination –
when pollen grains are
transferred by insects
such as, bees,
butterflies, ants ...
Agents of pollination cont’d
Wind pollination-
when pollen grains are
blown by the wind from
one flower to another or
to t...
Characteristics of insect and wind
pollinated flower
Insect pollinated Wind pollinated
Large brightly coloured petals Smal...
Insect pollinated flower Wind pollinated flower
What is pollination?
A. The transfer of insect from plant to plant
B. When the insect and the wind feed on the
flower.
C. ...
Which of the following is an agent of
pollination?
A. Insect B. Leaves
C. Sunlight D. Dispersal
Which of the following is NOT a
characteristic of insect pollinated flower?
A. Large brightly coloured petals.
B. Flowers ...
Which of the following is correct?
A. B.
C. D.
Insect pollinated
Wind pollinated
Leaf pollinated
Insect pollinated
Back
Try Again
Reference
• Major differences. (2015). Difference between
insect pollinated and wind pollinated flower.
Retrieved from
htt...
Pollination.
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Pollination.

PowerPoint on Pollination
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Science      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pollination.

  • 1. Pollination
  • 2. What is pollination? This is the transfer of pollen from stamen to stigma. Pollen grains are transferred or carried by insects, wind or water to another flower.
  • 3. Transfer of pollen grains
  • 4. Types of Pollination • Cross pollination- the transfer of pollen from the male reproductive organ (anther) of one plant to the female reproductive organ (stigma) of another plant. • Self pollination- the transfer of pollen from the anther to the stigma of the same flower or another flower on the same plant.
  • 5. Agents of pollination Insect pollination – when pollen grains are transferred by insects such as, bees, butterflies, ants and other insects from the anther of a flower to stigma of the same or another flower.
  • 6. Agents of pollination cont’d Wind pollination- when pollen grains are blown by the wind from one flower to another or to the same flower.
  • 7. Characteristics of insect and wind pollinated flower Insect pollinated Wind pollinated Large brightly coloured petals Small dull coloured petals Flowers have scent Flowers doesn’t have any scent Filament is strong and is inside the flower Filament is thin and hang outside the flower Pollen grains are sticky or hairy and are few in amount Pollen grains are light and numerous Stigma also hairy and sticky and is in the flower. Stigma feathery to catch pollen and hang outside the flower.
  • 8. Insect pollinated flower Wind pollinated flower
  • 9. What is pollination? A. The transfer of insect from plant to plant B. When the insect and the wind feed on the flower. C. The transfer of pollen from the stamen to stigma of a flower. D. The transfer of pollen from the anther to the filament
  • 10. Which of the following is an agent of pollination? A. Insect B. Leaves C. Sunlight D. Dispersal
  • 11. Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of insect pollinated flower? A. Large brightly coloured petals. B. Flowers have scents. C. Stigma feathery to catch pollen and hang outside the flower. D. Filament is strong and inside the flower.
  • 12. Which of the following is correct? A. B. C. D. Insect pollinated Wind pollinated Leaf pollinated Insect pollinated
  • 13. Back
  • 14. Try Again
  • 15. Reference • Major differences. (2015). Difference between insect pollinated and wind pollinated flower. Retrieved from http://www.majordifferences.com/2013/02/diffe rence-between-insect-pollinated.html • science learning hub. (2012, 6). Pollination and fertilisation. Retrieved from http://sciencelearn.org.nz/Contexts/Pollination/S cience-Ideas-and-Concepts/Pollination-and- fertilisation

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