Sourabh Muktibodh, Professor
Old G.D.C. Indore (M.P,)
India


NATIONAL MISSION ON EDUCATION
THROUGH INFORMATION AND
COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (NMEICT)
For India to emerge as a kno...




Higher education in India
Philip G. Altbach
INDIA IS rushing headlong toward economic success
and modernisation,...

. The recent London Times Higher Education
Supplement ranking of the world's top 200
universities included three in Chi...

India has significant advantages in the 21st century
knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector —
the third...

The rise in the number of part-time teachers and
the freeze on new full-time appointments in many
places have affected ...

Few in India are thinking creatively about
higher education. There is no field of higher
education research. Those in g...

India has survived with an increasingly mediocre higher
education system for decades. Now as India strives to
compete i...

The bigger challenge is that the students do
not choose to study in fields that will best
contribute to economic growth...

While it is true that Indian academics, by international
comparisons, are relatively well paid, they are not
necessaril...

Weaknesses Identified:
1. Abundance of un-nurtured talent.
2. Lack of timely and easy availability of knowledge
resour...
8. The lack of a legal framework that links the
qualification and certification framework to the
prescribed requirements f...
13. Substantial duplication of efforts at various levels
14. Time mismatch between school hours and
employment hours for t...
1. A large human resources of high intellectual
caliber
2. A large number of expert faculty in almost every
field
3. A gro...

To make quality the defining element of higher
education in India through a combination of
self and external quality ev...
1.
To arrange for periodic assessment and accreditation of
institutions of higher education or units thereof, or specific...
To promote the following core values among the HEIs of
the country:
1. Contribution to National Development
2. Fostering ...






NAAC,IQAC and – objectives and significance
Importance and methods of systematic
documentation and innovativ...








Our Speakers
Dr. Bhavesh Patel
Dr. Narendra Chouteliya
Dr.S.N. Yadav
Dr. S.L. Garg
Dr. Mangal Mishra
Dr. ...

This seminar is hopefully going to stir the
teaching community and might help the
colleges to understand the process, u...

“….We need a metamorphosis of
education-from cocoon a butterfly should
emerge. Improvement does not give a
butterfly, o...


Thanks
Best of luck to all of us.
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Naac ppt 1 (2)

NAAC, higher education[india]
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Naac ppt 1 (2)

  • 1. Sourabh Muktibodh, Professor Old G.D.C. Indore (M.P,) India
  • 2.   NATIONAL MISSION ON EDUCATION THROUGH INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (NMEICT) For India to emerge as a knowledge super power of the world in the shortest possible time it is imperative to convert our demographic Advantage into knowledge powerhouse by nurturing and honing our working population into knowledge or knowledge enabled working population.
  • 3.     Higher education in India Philip G. Altbach INDIA IS rushing headlong toward economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' Heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists, or managers to sustain high-tech development.
  • 4.  . The recent London Times Higher Education Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong, three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and one in India (an Indian Institute of Technology at number 41— the specific campus was not specified). These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
  • 5.  India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector — the third largest in the world in student numbers, after China and the United States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and research. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number of high quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system allows for a variety of policies and approaches.
  • 6.  The rise in the number of part-time teachers and the freeze on new full-time appointments in many places have affected morale in the academic profession. The lack of accountability means that teaching and research performance is seldom measured. The system provides few incentives to perform. Bureaucratic inertia hampers change. Student unrest and occasional faculty agitation disrupt operations. Nevertheless, with a semblance of normality, faculty administrators are able to provide teaching, coordinate examinations, and award degrees.
  • 7.  Few in India are thinking creatively about higher education. There is no field of higher education research. Those in government as well as academic leaders seem content to do the "same old thing." Academic institutions and systems have become large and complex. They need good data, careful analysis, and creative ideas
  • 8.  India has survived with an increasingly mediocre higher education system for decades. Now as India strives to compete in a globalised economy in areas that require highly trained professionals, the quality of higher education becomes increasingly important. So far, India's large educated population base and its reservoir of at least moderately well-trained university graduates have permitted the country to move ahead. But the competition is fierce. China in particular is heavily investing in improving its best universities with the aim of making a small group of them world class in the coming decade, and making a larger number internationally competitive research universities.
  • 9.  The bigger challenge is that the students do not choose to study in fields that will best contribute to economic growth — or to their own job prospects. Also, employers regularly complain that graduates are not adequately prepared for available jobs.
  • 10.  While it is true that Indian academics, by international comparisons, are relatively well paid, they are not necessarily effective. Academics, and especially college teachers, are constrained by rigid bureaucracy. Further, their work is not carefully evaluated — salary increases and promotions are awarded rather on the basis of seniority. Unfortunately, when salaries were increased in 2006, this boon was not accompanied by any reforms in the teaching profession or requirements for evaluation. A System of Academic Performance Indicators for promotion and appointment of professors and lecturers is yet to take roots. It appears that Indian academics want to do a good job and most are committed to their profession. However, structural impediments and an ossified culture get in the way.
  • 11.  Weaknesses Identified: 1. Abundance of un-nurtured talent. 2. Lack of timely and easy availability of knowledge resources to all. 3. Opportunities lost because of difficult access to information and guidance. 4. Mismatch between demand and supply of knowledge and skills 5. Lack of collaborative learning 6. Questionable quality of teaching at various places 7. Non-standardized testing
  • 12. 8. The lack of a legal framework that links the qualification and certification framework to the prescribed requirements for the job and a regular performance appraisal of those who prepare the content and of those who deliver and teach it. 9. The growing digital divide 10. A lack of personalized monitoring and long term tracking of growth and enhancement in learning, skill and performance. 11. A very low percentage of digital literacy 12. Lack of encouragement to excel
  • 13. 13. Substantial duplication of efforts at various levels 14. Time mismatch between school hours and employment hours for those learners who have to simultaneously earn the livelihood for their families. 15. Alack of access to institutions 16. A lack of access devices to digitally bypass shortcomings of Institutions and teachers 17. A lack of multi-layered networks for knowledge absorption and knowledge propagation. 18. The lack of a strong contingent of motivated teachers. 19. Inefficient functioning of the knowledge delivery mechanism.
  • 14. 1. A large human resources of high intellectual caliber 2. A large number of expert faculty in almost every field 3. A growing middle class with a high priority for education 4. A number of world class institutions of learning & research 5. Technological and Communication backbone to take their advantage in the field of knowledge empowerment of the mass of learners
  • 15.  To make quality the defining element of higher education in India through a combination of self and external quality evaluation, promotion and sustenance initiatives.
  • 16. 1. To arrange for periodic assessment and accreditation of institutions of higher education or units thereof, or specific academic programmes or projects; 2. To stimulate the academic environment for promotion of quality of teaching-learning and research in higher education institutions; 3. To encourage self- evaluation, accountability, autonomy and innovation in higher education; 4. To undertake quality-related studies, consultancy and training programmes, and 5. To collaborate with other stakeholders of higher education for quality evaluation, promotion and sustenance.
  • 17. To promote the following core values among the HEIs of the country: 1. Contribution to National Development 2. Fostering Global Competencies among Students 3. Inculcating a Value System among Students 4. Promoting the Use of Technology 5. Quest for Excellence
  • 18.       NAAC,IQAC and – objectives and significance Importance and methods of systematic documentation and innovative practices in SSR preparation/ presentation Teaching Learning Methodology- innovative practices Role of IQAC in Monitoring the Path of Excellence. Best practices and governance Science Education
  • 19.         Our Speakers Dr. Bhavesh Patel Dr. Narendra Chouteliya Dr.S.N. Yadav Dr. S.L. Garg Dr. Mangal Mishra Dr. Ramesh Mangal And Large participation from Principals, IQAC co-ordinators and faculty members.
  • 20.  This seminar is hopefully going to stir the teaching community and might help the colleges to understand the process, utility and significance of NAAC accreditation in a positive and healthy mood.
  • 21.  “….We need a metamorphosis of education-from cocoon a butterfly should emerge. Improvement does not give a butterfly, only a faster caterpillar.”
  • 22.   Thanks Best of luck to all of us.