How to Save a Place
BECOME AN ADVOCATE
Build Grassroots Support
Start with a grassroots campaign to galvanize the local community.
Then, when you approach govern...
Heart-Bombing
Heart-bombing is a fun way to get
great visuals of people interacting
with historic places. All you need
are...
This Place Matters Campaign
Another great way to gather supporters and build buzz is through the
This Place Matters campai...
Activate Your Team
Once you have your advocates on board, it's important to make sure
they have something to do after show...
Street Canvassing
Offline petitions are useful, too. Enthusiastic advocates can make a
huge difference in getting your mes...
Phone Banking
Phone banking is especially helpful when tied with an online petition,
as your phone bankers can give people...
“Honk and Wave”
If getting as many eyeballs as possible
for your place-saving project is a goal,
a "honk and wave" might b...
Take It to the (Grass) Top
The next step in advocating is getting your message in front of the
government leaders who can ...
Tips for Lobbying
Time your meeting request for when lawmakers are going to be
considering the project you're interested i...
The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America’s
historic places. Preservation Tips & Tools helps othe...
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[Preservation Tips & Tools] How to Save a Place: Become an Advocate

Over the course of our "How to Save a Place" toolkit series, we've covered a lot of ground: managing your expectations during a preservation project; understanding the difference between federal, state, and local groups; learning the fundraising basics; sorting through the various types of historic designations, and more. Now, it's time to start thinking like an advocate, because getting other people to support your project -- from your friends and neighbors to government officials -- will be critical to the success of your preservation efforts. Read the "How to Save a Place" series to date: http://blog.preservationnation.org/tag/how-to-save-a-place/
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - [Preservation Tips & Tools] How to Save a Place: Become an Advocate

  • 1. How to Save a Place BECOME AN ADVOCATE
  • 2. Build Grassroots Support Start with a grassroots campaign to galvanize the local community. Then, when you approach government leadership, you'll be able to demonstrate that the place you're trying to save has a lot of people pulling for it. You can get people involved in a variety of ways.
  • 3. Heart-Bombing Heart-bombing is a fun way to get great visuals of people interacting with historic places. All you need are a group of building-lovers and elementary school art supplies. Set a date and time to meet up with your hand-made hearts, and show a threatened building your love.
  • 4. This Place Matters Campaign Another great way to gather supporters and build buzz is through the This Place Matters campaign. Just print a sign, take a photo, and share it with the #ThisPlaceMatters hashtag. Keep an eye on the hashtag, and when you see other folks sharing your site, reach out to them to become more involved in your campaign.
  • 5. Activate Your Team Once you have your advocates on board, it's important to make sure they have something to do after showing their love. A good next step can be a petition from a site such as Change.org, where anyone can build a social media-friendly petition.
  • 6. Street Canvassing Offline petitions are useful, too. Enthusiastic advocates can make a huge difference in getting your message out -- and more names on your petition. Be sure your team is prepared with the details they need to answer questions, a handout with additional information … and never underestimate the power of props.
  • 7. Phone Banking Phone banking is especially helpful when tied with an online petition, as your phone bankers can give people the web address of the petition to sign as part of their call script.
  • 8. “Honk and Wave” If getting as many eyeballs as possible for your place-saving project is a goal, a "honk and wave" might be just the thing. Your spirited group of preservationists can help get drivers and passers-by fired up with passion for the cause.
  • 9. Take It to the (Grass) Top The next step in advocating is getting your message in front of the government leaders who can impact your project. Don't limit yourself to lobbying only at the federal level; focus on relationship-building and face-to-face advocacy at the state and local levels as well.
  • 10. Tips for Lobbying Time your meeting request for when lawmakers are going to be considering the project you're interested in. Gather accurate, factual material to support your position; build that information into a brief document you can leave behind as a reminder. Keep your examples as specific and local as possible. And say thank you!
  • 11. The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America’s historic places. Preservation Tips & Tools helps others do the same in their own communities. For more information, visit blog.preservationnation.org. Photos Courtesy: Slide 1: Sabastiaan ter Burg, Wikimedia Commons, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Ohio Valley Young Preservationists. Slide 2:Bernard Pollack, Flickr. Slide 3: Ohio Valley Young Preservationists. Side 4:National Trust for Historic Preservation. Slide 5: Leci Brandao, Flickr. Slide 6:Costa Constantinides, Flickr. Slide 7: National Trust for Historic Preservation. Slide 8: David Weible. Slide 9: Sabastiaan ter Burg, Wikimedia Commons. Slide 10: National Trust for Historic Preservation

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