Previously Unknown
Film Analysis
Terminology
Camera Shots,
Angles and
Movements
Arial Shots
Aerial shots are often filmed from cranes or
helicopters to show large landscapes, much
like establishing shot...
Canted Angle Shots:
This is a type of shot where the camera is
tilted one way to create lines that are at an
angle to the ...
Editing
Eyeline Match
This is an editing practice to ensure continuity
within the film when characters are looking at
an object, c...
Graphic Match
Graphic match is an editing technique used to
transition seamlessly between two shots that
metaphorically li...
Action Match
An action match occurs when two shots
showing two different perspectives of action
are filmed apart from each...
Parallel Editing
Parallel editing is a technique used to imply
that two characters are in the same situation
without havin...
Superimposition
Superimposition is where two shots/images
are overlaid. This shows a link between these
two shots, giving ...
Sound
Synchronous / Asynchronous Sound
Synchronous sound is that which matches
what is happening within the frame, whereas
async...
Direct Address
When a character directly speaks to another
character, this is direct address. Often the
character doing th...
Incidental Music
Incidental music is essentially background
music that adds atmosphere to what is
happening on screen. If ...
Stings
A sting is a short piece of music that
introduces something that regularly occurs.
For example, the background musi...
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Previously unknown film analysis terminology

some terminology used when analysing films that I was previously unaware of
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Entertainment & Humor      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Previously unknown film analysis terminology

  • 1. Previously Unknown Film Analysis Terminology
  • 2. Camera Shots, Angles and Movements
  • 3. Arial Shots Aerial shots are often filmed from cranes or helicopters to show large landscapes, much like establishing shots, but from the air. These are usually used to show buildings in action movies, such as the bank robbery scene at the start of The Dark Knight.
  • 4. Canted Angle Shots: This is a type of shot where the camera is tilted one way to create lines that are at an angle to the side of the frame. An example of this is during the hotel fight scene in Inception; the walls are at a 45 degree angle to the side of the frame.
  • 5. Editing
  • 6. Eyeline Match This is an editing practice to ensure continuity within the film when characters are looking at an object, character or landscape outside of the frame they’re in. Essentially, it makes sure that the character’s line of sight goes to what they are meant to be looking at, not lower or higher. This is seen many times in LotR, when Frodo looks out towards the Eye of Sauron
  • 7. Graphic Match Graphic match is an editing technique used to transition seamlessly between two shots that metaphorically link. This was done in Hitchcock’s Psycho in the shower murder scene to transition between the drain and the victim’s eye, and in 2001: A Space Odyssey when transitioning between a bone in the sky and an ‘orbital nuclear weapons platform’.
  • 8. Action Match An action match occurs when two shots showing two different perspectives of action are filmed apart from each other but edited to look like they are happening sequentially. In Hot Fuzz, the shot of Danny licking his lips could have been shot days apart from the shot of him breaking the fence but edited to suggest it happened one after the other.
  • 9. Parallel Editing Parallel editing is a technique used to imply that two characters are in the same situation without having to show both characters in the frame at the same time, making the scene more engaging. For example, during the chase scene in The Dark Knight Rises, Batman and the convoy of police cars are often separately shot, but it is still clear that the police are chasing Batman.
  • 10. Superimposition Superimposition is where two shots/images are overlaid. This shows a link between these two shots, giving the scene greater meaning and allowing more detail to be shown in a single shot. A good example of this is seen in the Hangover while Alan gambles. The superimposition of mathematical formulae onto the shot shows his intelligence during this time.
  • 11. Sound
  • 12. Synchronous / Asynchronous Sound Synchronous sound is that which matches what is happening within the frame, whereas asynchronous sound is that which is relevant to something happening out of frame. For example, footsteps match someone walking would be synchronous because it is synchronised with the action on screen, but the sound of police sirens being played whilst the frame shows bank robbers and not a police car would be asynchronous.
  • 13. Direct Address When a character directly speaks to another character, this is direct address. Often the character doing the addressing will use the other character’s name, or some such phrase much like “my friend” to initiate the direct address.
  • 14. Incidental Music Incidental music is essentially background music that adds atmosphere to what is happening on screen. If a murder has just been revealed, the incidental music might be a high pitched, sharp noise. It suspense is being built, the incidental music might be a long, middle-pitched droning sound.
  • 15. Stings A sting is a short piece of music that introduces something that regularly occurs. For example, the background music during the title sequence for various film companies such as Universal would be a sting.

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