Introduction to Population Study
Master of Population Sciences (MPS Semester-1)
POPULATION
An Introduction to Concepts and...
Managing the Health and Mortality Transition
We would all like to live as long as possible, and the only real issue is tha...
Lowering Infant, Child, and Maternal Mortality
“Raising mortality is better grist for science literature than for
populati...
• A Broader Mandate to Empower Women
Lifting pronatalist pressures will especially involve a change in gender roles taught...
Making Family Planning Available
The fertility management action items of the ICPD Programme of
Action relate to family pl...
Case Study Fertility Management
Major Aspects of Case study
•Management of gender equality
• Control on Reproduction
• Lim...
Managing the Migration/Urban Transition
Migration should be the most easily controlled of the three
population processes
L...
The next phase in world population policy planning is to cope with a world in
which the haves and have-nots—the developed ...
Managing the Family and Household Transition
The ICPD Programme of Action gives voice to the idea that family
transformati...
What Lies Ahead?
Population policy of the 21st century
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Population policy of the 21st century

Population Policy
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Population policy of the 21st century

  • 1. Introduction to Population Study Master of Population Sciences (MPS Semester-1) POPULATION An Introduction to Concepts and Issues John R. Weeks
  • 2. Managing the Health and Mortality Transition We would all like to live as long as possible, and the only real issue is that the longer we live, the lower the birth rate must be in order to keep a lid on population growth. It means sending aid only to those countries that show promise of being able to bring their rates of population growth under control and abandoning those nations that are not likely to improve. The “lifeboat ethic” and “triage” are two perspectives on how this might be implemented. The “lifeboat ethic” and “triage” are two perspectives on how this might be implemented.
  • 3. Lowering Infant, Child, and Maternal Mortality “Raising mortality is better grist for science literature than for population policy” The goal of the entire world community is to improve the health of all humans—which has the effect of lowering mortality, and actions to lower mortality are paramount among the goals of the ICPD International Conference of Population & Development ICPD There is a very high correlation among countries between infant death and the total fertility rate—the lower the infant death, the fewer the children women are likely to be having. The survival of children with family planning strategies are most suitable to be successful in promoting maternal and child health.
  • 4. • A Broader Mandate to Empower Women Lifting pronatalist pressures will especially involve a change in gender roles taught to boys and girls, giving equal treatment to the sexes in the educational and occupational spheres. If a woman’s adulthood and femininity are expressed in other ways besides childbearing, then the pressure lessens to bear children as a means of forcing social recognition. Any policy aimed at affecting motivation will, by definition, have to alter the way people perceive the social world and how they deal with their environment on an everyday basis. It will have to involve a restructuring of power relationships within the family, a reordering of priorities with respect to gender roles, a reorganization of the economic structure to enhance the participation of women, a concerted effort to raise the level of education for all people in society, and economic and political stability, which allows people to plan for a future rather than just cope with today’s survival problems. History suggests that most of these changes have evolved somewhat naturally in the course of economic development, at least in Western nations.
  • 5. Making Family Planning Available The fertility management action items of the ICPD Programme of Action relate to family planning, which involves the provision of birth prevention information, services, and appliances. Family Planning involves teaching women (and increasingly men as well) about their bodies and teaching them how to prevent births, usually with contraceptives but sometimes also with abortions. Family planning programs have remained the most popular means of implementing a policy to slow down population growth
  • 6. Case Study Fertility Management Major Aspects of Case study •Management of gender equality • Control on Reproduction • Limit Fertility • Number of Children, People want •Examples of Country regarding Fertility • Egypt • India • Singapore • Romania • France
  • 7. Managing the Migration/Urban Transition Migration should be the most easily controlled of the three population processes Labor migration has become commonplace in the world today, and countries have accepted guest workers on the simple assumption that they can be sent home when the need arises. In the final analysis, most attempts to limit immigration are motivated less by a desire to limit population growth in general, and more by a desire to limit the entry of certain kinds of people into the country
  • 8. The next phase in world population policy planning is to cope with a world in which the haves and have-nots—the developed and developing countries—are divided not only by income and rates of population growth, but by distinctly different population structures. Managing the Age Transition So far the problems associated with population growth and those associated with population ageing have been studied separately.
  • 9. Managing the Family and Household Transition The ICPD Programme of Action gives voice to the idea that family transformations are part and parcel of the other demographic changes taking place in society, the management issues relate especially to issues of gender equity and protecting the rights of women in families and households. Of Particular importance is the idea that women should have access to education and the paid labor force, with governments assisting women with this by providing access to child care. This action item is not simply for developing countries. It can apply as well to the countries of southern and eastern Europe, where women are educated and are in the labor force. Traditional family values still suggest that when a woman marries she should leave the labor force and take care of the children & Husband too. Due to this reason, delay in marriages & low fertility rate in Europe. Due Gender inequality Fertility is too Haigh or too low.
  • 10. What Lies Ahead?

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