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HOW TO MAKE GREAT PICTURES JANUARY 2014 VOLUME 78, NO. 1
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Photographed on the 7R. Exposure: 35mm / 1/125 sec / f/5.6 / ISO 400
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Dan Bracaglia, our assistant online editor, made this photo at Clearview horse Farm
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POPPHOTO.COM popular photography 11
The moment a passion
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Popular photography january 2014

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Transcripts - Popular photography january 2014

  • 1. PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS P.58 THE KEY TO PERFECT LANDSCAPES: TREES CAMERA YEAR EASY PHOTOSHOP STEPS FOR ALL YOUR IMAGES OF THE SIMPLE PORTRAIT LIGHTING P.42 10 BEST INKJET PAPERS P.74 PHOTO GEAR FOR YOUR SMARTPHONE P.18 P.44 P. 52 FULL TEST P. 77 6 SAlpoha n7R y Redefining Full-Frame Photography GEAR TESTS Canon EF 24–70mm f/2.8L II P.90 Pentax K-3 P.82
  • 2. NX300. A STEP AHEAD OF DSLR. Higher Frame Rate With 8.6fps continuous shooting, the NX300 lets you capture the moments within the moment with a series of brilliantly clear stills. Easier Sharing Dual-band Wi-Fi® capabilities and a dedicated Direct Link hot key let you quickly share images with your Samsung devices and the world. NX300 available in black, white and brown. samsung.com/us/nxseries © 2014 Samsung Electronics America, Inc. All rights reserved. Samsung is a trademark or registered trademark of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. All products and brand names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Screen images simulated. Appearance of device may vary. Features and speci cations are subject to change without prior noti cation. Based on results from models in the same price range: Nikon D5200, Canon EOS-100D, Canon EOS-700D. Faster Autofocus A Hybrid AF (autofocus) system combines phase and contrast detection for faster and more accurate autofocusing.
  • 3. Shoot fast. Share faster. 6-time Olympic gold medalist and world record holder
  • 4. HOW TO MAKE GREAT PICTURES JANUARY 2014 VOLUME 78, NO. 1 58 GAME CHANGER Its size is the only thing diminutive about our Camera of the Year for 2013. Everything else about the Sony Alpha 7R is massive, from its imaging capabilities to its potential for changing photography as we know it. By Dan Richards 52 THE MAN WHO LOVES TREES Enmeshed in a lifelong arboreal love affair, a landscape pro tells you how to compose, expose, and generally flatter solo or grouped trees of every ilk. By Charlie Waite 74 TEN BEST FINE-ART PAPERS Often what you print on can be just as important as what you shoot. Here are our favorite inkjet papers from glossy to matte, and everything in between. By Andrew Darlow FEATURES 63 THE 20TH ANNUAL READERS’ PHOTO CONTEST Landscapes, portraits, action, wildlife, architecture, and still lifes: Our readers master them all! By Mathew Ismael Ruiz POPPHOTO.COM JANUARY 2014 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY 3
  • 5. 22 13 NEXT 13 WE WANT THIS The Nikon Df: A DSLR that’s equal parts retro and futuristic. 14 JUST OUT A super speedy normal Nikkor, another (!) Fujifilm X camera, a studio strobe with TTL control, and more. 18 ROUNDUP Five of today’s coolest photo accessories for smartphones. SHARE 21 PHOTO CHALLENGE We were suckers for our food photo winner. 22 MY PROJECT He reinterprets classic botanical prints in the studio. 26 I, PHOTOGRAPHER Stalking the red carpet: nice work, if you can get it. 28 LETTERS Your thoughts on photo gear and the rise of the camera phone. 30 TECH TALK A potpourri of helpful answers to questions from our readers. HOW 35 CREATIVE THINKING Experiment with lighting tools to produce magical effects from reflective surfaces. 36 FIX IT FAST Bring out the cloning tools when dueling subjects compete. 38 TIPS & TRICKS See how reflections can show you elements of a scene that you hadn’t seen before. 40 TRAVELING PHOTOGRAPHER Find out how there’s more than skiing to Sun Valley, ID. 42 LIGHTING Put the focus on your portrait subjects with this simple but effective form of portrait lighting. 44 SOFTWARE WORKSHOP Follow these first crucial steps on any image you start to edit. 48 YOU CAN DO IT Try these sure-fire techniques for moody still-life setups. LAB 77 ILC TEST Sony Alpha 7R No surprise here: Our Camera of the Year passed all our tests with flying colors. 82 DSLR TEST Pentax K–3 The newest Pentax flagship sails into port, weather-sealed and ready for action. 90 LENS TEST Canon EF 24–70mm f/2.8L II USM Canon upgrades a pro favorite with mixed results. 92 LENS TEST Fujifilm Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R The widest lens for Fujifilm’s X cameras is a winner. DON’T MISS . . . 6 EDITOR’S LETTER 10 SHOWCASE 106 TIME EXPOSURE 112 BACKSTORY POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY (ISSN 1542-0337) (USPS 504-890), January 2014, Volume 78, Issue 1, is published monthly by Bonnier Corporation, 2 Park Ave., New York, NY 10016. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices. Authorized periodicals postage by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Canada, and for payment in cash. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Popular Photography, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235; www.PopPhoto.com/cs. If the postal service alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40052054. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: IMEX, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2. SUBSCRIP-TION SERVICES: Visit www.PopPhoto.com/cs to manage your account 24/7. NEWSSTAND COVER: SATOSHI (SONY); CHARLIE WAITE (LANDSCAPE). SUBSCRIBER COVER: KAREN HARRIS. THIS PAGE: WILLIAM RUGEN (FLOWER); S.L. DIXON (MAN). PREVIOUS PAGE: KYLE GILBERT (DUOMO); NORMAN PRESS (FLOWER); DEBBIE DICARLO (WATERFALL); KAREN HARRIS (SHEEP); MATT WALKER (STARS); MARTA EVEREST (GIRL); ALAN AARON (TENNIS); SATOSHI (SONY); CHARLIE WAITE (LANDSCAPE). 42 4 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY JANUARY 2014 POPPHOTO.COM PROFESSIONAL Durable, Affordable PRO 700 DX Max Height: 74.8 in. Max Load: 15.0 lbs. Weight: 7.1 lbs. SUPER A.M.T. ALLOY PRO 330 DX Max Height: 63.0 in. Max Load: 8.8 lbs. Weight: 3.5 lbs. SLIK PRO series tripods use Super A.M.T. (Aluminum, Magnesium, Titanium) alloy to make them stronger and lighter than standard metal tripods. The best selling SLIK PRO 700 DX tripod is a versatile and professional full sized tripod designed to handle heavy camera equipment. But despite it size it is very light-weight and travels well. The SLIK PRO 330DX is a smaller light-weight tripod designed for the photo enthusiast. EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTION BY: 7642 Woodwind Drive, Huntington Beach, CA 92647 www.kenkotokinausa.com SUPER A.M.T. ALLOY Visit our website for more information at
  • 6. THE TOUGHEST FILTERS ON THE PLANET.
  • 7. editor’s letter ‘Pro’ is a State of Mind It happens every year. In the weeks after our Janu-ary issue, when we showcase the winners of our Annual Readers’ Photo Contest, I get a handful of letters asking why we don’t have separate catego-ries for professional photographers and amateurs. After all, with the occasional big-name pro such as Peter Lik and Rodney Lough Jr. entering—and winning prizes—what ordinary camera-toting enthusiast stands a chance? Well, this year our winners were anything but ordinary, yet seven of the eight, it turns out, are not professional photographers. Among them you’ll fnd a college student and a retired music teacher, a hedge fund manager, a police offcer, and a self-described housewife. Even the winner of the $1,000 Grand Prize is a photo enthusiast, not a pro. Their images stood out among the more than 2,000 entries the contest received and we didn’t learn of their varied professions until after we’d interviewed them for our story. (The article starts on page 63; to see a gallery of both winners and runners-up, go to PopPhoto.com/readerscontest2013winners.) Over the years, I’ve heard a number of pro shooters say that their job is getting harder as they face competition from amateurs armed with a good camera and a little luck. That’s undoubtedly true. But in the case of our contest, I attribute the winners’ success to a lot more than that. Yes, these enthusiasts shot with terrifc and sometimes pro-level gear. But, more to the point, they chose the appropriate equipment—cameras, lenses, often a tripod, a few lights—to get the photo they wanted. They applied soft-ware carefully, whether just for a subtle fne-tuning or for more dramatic effects. And they made their own luck by taking pains either to set up the shot or to get to the right place at the right time and then to wait for the all-important decisive moment. In every case, the winners worked the scene, trying different camera angles, focal lengths, exposure settings, and the like to ensure that they captured as excellent an image as they could. One of the roles of Popular Photography is to blur the sometimes sharp boundary between pro and non-pro photographers. We do this by provid-ing our vast audience of readers with tough-minded and rigorous analysis in our camera and lens testing, mentorship from accomplished shooters and image editors who give you their tips and ideas, and encouragement to share your experience and your best shots. No matter who you are, how many years you’ve been photographing, or what camera you use. NewsstaNd Our 2013 Camera of the Year, Sony’s Alpha 7R, shook up the world of photography this fall. Satoshi shot the cover and images on pages 58 and 77. subscriber Karen Harris angled to photograph this ram against a snowbank for her Avedonesque portrait, winning the Animals category in our contest, page 63. Editor-in-chiEf MiRiAM LEuChtER Art dirEctor Jason Beckstead SEnior Editor Peter Kolonia SEnior Editor Dan Richards fEAturES Editor Debbie Grossman tEchnicAl Editor Philip Ryan tEchnology MAnAgEr Julia Silber ASSociAtE Editor Matthew ismael Ruiz group photo Editor thomas Payne ASSiStAnt photo Editor Linzee Lichtman dESignEr Wesley Fulghum EditoriAl coordinAtor Jae Segarra contributing EditorS Laurence Chen, tim Fitzharris, Lori Fredrickson, ian Plant, Jeff Wignall popphoto.coM Editor Stan horaczek ASSiStAnt onlinE Editor Dan Bracaglia in MEMoriAM herbert Keppler ExEcutivE vicE prESidEnt ERiC zinCzEnKO ASSociAtE publiShEr AnthOnY M. RuOtOLO Anthony.Ruotolo@bonniercorp.com chiEf MArkEting officEr Elizabeth Burnham Murphy ASSociAtE publiShEr, MArkEting Michael Gallic finAnciAl dirEctor tara Bisciello photo And trAvEl MAnAgEr Sara Schiano Flynn Northeast advertisiNg oFFice Shawn Lindeman, Frank McCaffrey, Chip Parham Ad ASSiStAnt Amanda Smyth midwest MAnAgErS Doug Leipprandt, Carl Benson Ad ASSiStAnt Mojdeh zarrinnal west coast accouNt MAnAgEr Bob Meth Ad ASSiStAnt Sam Miller-Christiansen detroit MAnAgErS Edward A. Bartley, Jeff Roberge Ad ASSiStAnt Diane Pahl AdvErtiSing coordinAtor irene Reyes Coles dirEctor of cuStuM SolutionS noreen Myers gEnErAl MAnAgEr digitAl buSinESS dEvElopMEnt Shannon Rudd digitAl opErAtionS dirEctor Rochelle Rodriguez digitAl cAMpAign MAnAgErS Yvonne hunte, Ed Liriano, Wilber Perez digitAl SAlES MAnAgEr Elizabeth Besada SEnior digitAl coordinAtor Maureen O’Donoghue group SAlES dEvElopMEnt dirEctor Alex Garcia SAlES dEvElopMEnt MAnAgErS Kate Gregory, Charlotte Grima, Kelly Martin crEAtivE SErvicES dirEctor ingrid M. Reslmaier MArkEting dESign dirEctorS Jonathan Berger, Gabe Ramirez MArkEting dESign MAnAgEr Sarah hughes digitAl dESign MAnAgEr Steve Gianaca group EvEntS And proMotionS dirEctor Beth hetrick EvEntS dirEctor Michelle Cast EvEntS And proMotionS MAnAgEr Eshonda Caraway-Evans ASSiStAnt EvEntS & proMotionS MAnAgEr Vanessa Vazquez EvEntS coordinAtor Christine Detris conSuMEr MArkEting dirEctor Bob Cohn rEtAil SinglE copy SAlES: procirc rEtAil SolutionS group tony DiBisceglie huMAn rESourcES dirEctor Kim Putman production MAnAgEr Betty Dong group production dirEctor Laurel Kurnides This producT is from susTainably managed foresTs and conTrolled sources. chAirMAn Jonas Bonnier chiEf ExEcutivE officEr Dave Freygang ExEcutivE vicE prESidEnt Eric zinczenko chiEf contEnt officEr David Ritchie chiEf finAnciAl officEr nancy Coalter chiEf opErAting officEr Lisa Earlywine chiEf brAnd dEvElopMEnt officEr Sean holzman vicE prESidEnt, conSuMEr MArkEting Bruce Miller vicE prESidEnt, corporAtE coMMunicAtionS Dean turcol gEnErAl counSEl Jeremy thompson For customer service aNd subscriptioN questioNs, such as Renewals, Address Changes, Email Preferences, Billing and Account Status, go to: popphoto.com/cs. You can also call 800-876-6636, email us at popularphotography@emailcustomerservice.com, or write to Popular Photography, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235 6 popular photography january 2014 POPPHOTO.COM
  • 8. CPS - Camera Protection System The center of a camera bag is its most vulnerable spot. Manfrotto’s CPS provides a thick layer of structured, shock-absorbing core section dividers that safely cushions the equipment you keep at the heart of your Professional bag. Exo-Tough Construction The outer face of all Manfrotto Professional bags has a rigid and strong multi-layered construction to protect your gear against impact. Backpacks, rollers and shoulder bags have reinforced feet providing even NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. Sweepstakes begins 12:01 AM Eastern Time (EDT) November 1, 2013 and ends at 11:59 PM more protection for your equipment. Eastern Time (EST) on February 28, 2014 (the “Sweepstakes Period”). Sweepstakes is offered only in the fifty (50) United States (and the District of Columbia). Residents of Puerto Rico are ineligible. Must be a legal U.S. resident and at least 21 years or older to enter. One Grand Prize: One (1) 2014 GMC Acadia (APR: $34,050) ; Two First Prizes: 2014 GMC Terrain (APR per vehicle: $26,305); Second Prizes: 10 Adventure Tours for two (APR: $550 per experience for two); Third Prizes: 100 Manfrotto Be Free tripods (APR: $200 per tripod. Total ARV: $112,765. The odds of winning are determined by the total number of Eligible Entries received. For complete details, please see complete Official Rules www.manfrotto.us/readyforeverything . Vitec Group, PLC 10 Mountainview Road, Suite 320 South, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458.
  • 9. Photographed on the 7R. Exposure: 35mm / 1/125 sec / f/5.6 / ISO 400
  • 10. A NEW FRAME of MIND. Sony® 7R Compact Full-Frame Interchangeable Lens Camera Introducing the no-compromise full-frame that’s so small, you’ll take it everywhere. Interchangeable lenses. 36MP. OLED viewf nder. Wi-Fi sharing—all in a compact body that will change your perspective entirely. Power of imaging. Be moved. See the difference for yourself at www.sony.com/a7experience ©2014 Sony Electronics Inc. The Sony logo is a trademark of Sony. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners.
  • 11. showcase * Sony alpha 7r JUMP SHOT Dan Bracaglia, our assistant online editor, made this photo at Clearview horse Farm in Shelbyville, tn, during a media excursion hosted by Sony that gave journalists and bloggers the chance to try its latest cameras and lenses. he captured this riding demo with the new Sony alpha 7r and 28–70mm f/3.6–5.6 Sony FE oSS lens zoomed wide to 28mm. an exposure of 1/800 sec at f/3.5, ISo 500, froze the action. For our full lab and field test of the alpha 7r—our Camera of the year—see page 77. 10 popular photography january 2014 dan bracaglia
  • 12. POPPHOTO.COM popular photography 11
  • 13. The moment a passion becomes the love of your life. This is the moment we work for. // FASCINATION MADE BY ZEISS Touit 2.8/12 and Touit 1.8/32 Introducing the new ZEISS Touit lenses—for photographers who are passionate about their image making. Designed for the Sony NEX and Fujifi lm X Series cameras, these luxurious autofocus lenses deliver the legendary precision and performance of ZEISS optics, for stunning images that go straight to the heart. www.zeiss.com/touitfascination
  • 14. BANKING ON nostalgia, Nikon looked back some 40 years to its classic F line when designing its latest DSLR. Inside the new Df is the same 16.2-megapixel full-frame sensor and processor that’s in Nikon’s top-of-the-line D4. And the Df promises similarly excellent images, including low-light capability up to ISO 204,800. But what’s missing? The Df holds only a single SD card, and its 39-point autofocus system resembles that of Nikon’s new D610, rather than the D4’s 51-point version. Video also ends up on the cutting-room floor. FUJIFILM’S NEW X-TRANS MEETS X-MOUNT 14 NIKON WOWS WITH A PRICEY NEW PRIME 16 ACCESSORIZE YOUR SMARTPHONE CAMERA 18 16.2MP full-frame CMOS sensor Expeed 3 Processor 3.2-inch, 921,000-dot LCD $2,747, street, body only nikonusa.com This is truly an SLR for lovers of Nikon’s old school—a collapsible exposure-meter coupling makes it compatible with vintage Nikkor lenses, and the shutter button accepts threaded remote triggers. Get the body only (in all-black or with silver trim), or in a kit with a retro-styled, special-edition 50mm f/1.8G lens ($2,997, street). WE WANT THIS ALL NEW F Nikon gets in on the retro game POPPHOTO.COM JANUARY 2014 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY 13
  • 15. next * just out Mini LuMix A high-powered miniature ILC for Micro Four Thirds Panasonic’s new Lumix GM1 is one of the smallest Micro Four Thirds models we’ve seen to date, but its 16MP Live MOS sensor and Venus processor are identical to those in the larger, higher-end Lumix GX7. This interchangeable-lens compact weighs just 0.6 pounds with a battery, SD card, and 12–32mm f/3.5–5.6 Pansonic G Vario Mega O.I.S. kit zoom attached. The new lens was Panasonic Lumix GM1 $749, street, with 12–32mm f/3.5–5.6 panasonic.net a slider on a touchscreen, made easier by the GM1’s picture-in-picture magnification and focus-peaking features. The body size is also responsible for the limited speed of the mechanical shutter, which tops out at 1/500 sec. InsIdE tEch Optimize It Fujifilm’s Lens Modulation optimizer uses the optical characteristics of each lens to adjust in-camera image processing and sharpening. this combats diffraction and aberrations when capturing jPEGs. usually performed in desktop software, the process happens in this camera for sharper images whether the aperture is wide open or almost closed. It works with all X-mount lenses. designed specifically for the GM1, whose 3.88x2.16x1.20-inch magnesium-alloy body would create an odd balance with bulkier glass. It has no manual-focus ring, so you’ll need to get used to focusing manually with > Tamron announced the development of a new 150–600mm f/5–6.3 zoom, now this maker’s longest telephoto lens. It packs 20 elements (three of them low dispersion) into 13 groups and sports its Ultrasonic Silent Drive motor, eBand coating, and Vibration Compensation. It may be small, but the GM1 still manages to house a pop-up flash. inside job A sensor and processor update for a Fujiflm ILC FujiFiLM’s Latest X-mount ILC, the 16MP X-E2, looks almost identical to its predecessor, the X-E1. Its magnesium-alloy body, 2.36-million-dot OLED finder, and most of the buttons remain in the same places as the X-E1. But the X-E2’s X-Trans II CMOS sensor and EXR Processor II make their X-mount camera debut here. We first saw the new X-Trans in the fixed-lens X100S, which (with the X20) was the first model to use Fujifilm’s Lens Modulation Optimizer (see Inside Tech, right). The X-E2 has built-in Wi-Fi, 1920x1080p60 video at up to 36Mbps, and a new 3-inch, 1.04-million-dot rear LCD. Fujifilm X-e2 $999, street, body only www.fujifilmusa.com 14 PoPuLar PhotoGraPhy january 2014 POPPHOTO.COM
  • 16. Move into a New World INTRODUCING A CAMERA AS PROFESSIONAL A S Y O U A R E . The exceptionally professional Olympus OM-D E-M1 gives you the power to accurately and sharply capture the detail and beauty in any image. Now you can turn the smallest aspects of a photo into a powerful story with the new Dual Focus 16 Megapixel Sensor, TruePic VII high performance image processing engine, and Fine Detail Processing. These ensure that each picture you take will be clear, precise, and exceed your expectations. But don’t take our word for it; you need to try the OM-D E-M1 to believe it. www.getolympus.com/em1 • One of the smallest and lightest bodies in its class at 17.5 ounces* • Built-in Wi-Fi • Full system of premium, interchangeable lenses *E-M1 body only “When the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting awarded me a grant to pursue a project on child labor, I chose the Olympus OM-D. It’s so small and responsive, it became an extension of my eye. It allowed me to capture amazingly crisp, clear images and the details I needed to tell my story. “ -Larry C. Price, Olympus Visionary Shot with an OM-D.
  • 17. next * just out Profoto B1 500 Air TTL $1,995, street profoto.com/us Coma Killer A classic lens is reborn, with some tweaks lens, which has nine elements (two aspherical) in six groups, will control light falloff across the entire frame and retain sharpness, even at maximum aperture. It ditched the aperture ring and added a Silent Wave autofocus motor as well a coating to reduce ghosting and flare. Given a street price approaching $1,700, we hope to see excellent SQF results in our test lab. The Zeiss Otus has some company. Nikon says that its new 58mm f/1.4G, an update to the AI Noct Nikkor 58mm f/1.2 released in 1977, recreates the classic optic’s signature minimization of sagittal coma flare, common when shooting point light sources in dimly lit environments. Nikon claims that its new > The FAA has approved camera use during all phases of air travel, so you can now snap some pictures from below the clouds. > Everpix is apparently not forever. The photography storage cloud service is closing up shop, leaving users to find a new place to collect all of their images. > The SD Association announced its Ultra High Speed (UHS) Speed Class 3 (U3) specification. Requiring a 30 MB/s constant minimum write speed, the specification is designed to indicate whether a card can handle 4K video. > A study by the University of Texas at Dallas published in Psychological Science determined learning digital photography and editing skills helps improve memory in older people. Wire-Free POPPHOTO.COM Nikon 58mm f/1.4G $1,697, street nikonusa.com the lowdown ANdroid oUsTer? At this year’s Tizen developer summit in seoul, south Korea, samsung revealed that its forthcoming NX300M smart camera runs a modified build of the Linux Foundation’s Tizen software, an open-source, Linux-based operating system. The news could signal a shift towards independence from Google’s Android os, which powers samsung’s Galaxy and Galaxy NX cameras along with most of its mobile devices. ProFoTo LiGhTs have long been the strobe of pros, and typically they stay put in a studio. But with its new B1 system, Profoto wants you to take the studio on the road, giving you the power of a monolight with the flexibility of a speedlight. Fully wireless, with an operating range of up to 1,000 feet, the B1 supports manual or TTL control of up to three groups. Attaching the optional Air Remote TTL to your camera’s hot-shoe gives you through-the-lens point-and-shoot automation of the B1’s output. The Canon version of the remote is available now; a Nikon version is on the way. At lower power settings, the battery-powered B1 can fire up to 20 flashes per second. At full power, the B1 will recycle in less than 2 seconds. Profoto claims that the battery will provide up to 220 full-power flashes per charge. Profoto’s newest monolight cuts the cord 16 PoPULAr PhoToGrAPhy Picture Perfect onOne Perfect Photo Suite 8 For even the most avid user of an editor such as Adobe Photoshop or Apple Aperture, some tasks are best done by a plug-in. onone’s app suite, which can enhance, enlarge, or convert your image to b&w, has an update (from $80; www. ononesoftware.com) with some cool improvements. there’s a new Perfect enhance module for basic tasks, and the new Perfect eraser that replaces unwanted elements. works as a standalone program, too.
  • 18. Shoot the next Hollywood blockbuster with the world’s most amazing digital cinema camera! Film Industry Quality Every feature of the Blackmagic Cinema Camera has been designed for quality. With 2 separate models, you can choose from the world’s most amazing EF or MFT lenses from crafters such as Canon™, Zeiss™ and more. For extreme high end work, you can shoot full 12 bit CinemaDNG RAW uncompressed fi les for incredible creative range in DaVinci Resolve color correction, as well as the world’s best chroma keying! Accessories Built In High end cinema cameras often require thousands of dollars of extra accessories to make them work, however the Blackmagic Cinema Camera includes accessories you need built in! You get a large 5 inch monitor, super fast SSD RAW recorder and professional audio recorder all built in! You also get UltraScope software, used via the built in Thunderbolt™ connection, for on set waveform monitoring! The world’s most mind blowing feature fi lms, television commercials and music videos look amazing because they are fi lmed with digital fi lm cameras! The new award winning Blackmagic Cinema Camera is unlike a regular video camera or DSLR camera because it’s a true high end digital fi lm camera! You get a true Hollywood cinematic look with 13 stops of dynamic range, interchangeable lenses, high quality RAW and ProRes® fi le recording plus much more! Dramatically Better than DSLR Video The Blackmagic Cinema Camera includes a large 2.5K sensor for super sharp images that eliminate resolution loss HD bayer sensors suffer from, while creating manageable fi les that are not too big! The large screen LCD allows easy focusing and the high speed SSD recorder lets you record in ProRes® , DNxHD® and RAW fi le formats for Final Cut Pro X and DaVinci Resolve! Super Wide Dynamic Range The Blackmagic Cinema Camera captures an incredible 13 stops of dynamic range so you can simultaneously capture the brightest highlights and the darkest shadows all at the same time into the recorded fi le! This means you capture more of the scene than a regular video camera can so you get more freedom for color correction for a feature fi lm look! You also get a full copy of DaVinci Resolve! Blackmagic Cinema Camera $1,995 Includes DaVinci Resolve Software Camera lens and accessories not included Learn more today www.blackmagicdesign.com/cinemacamera
  • 19. next * rounduP The New Pro MoBILe Gear > Getty Images has partnered up with The Echo Nest, the industry’s largest music intelligence company, to offer a fixed-price license to thousands of photos of musicians for its customers’ (think MTV and the BBC) websites and apps. > Nikon’s new D610 is a 24.3MP full-frame DSLR with a 39-point autofocus system, Nikon’s Expeed 3 image processor, and a new shutter with 6-fps bursts and a new Quiet Continuous Shutter mode. It sells for $1,997, street, body only. > Due to a decrease in demand for high-end cameras, Nikon cut its full year-end sales forecast for the second time this year. > Adding 35 million accounts to its initial estimate, Adobe said more user accounts got hacked, urging customers to change their passwords. toolbox Apple fnally updates its pro line of desktops In the age of the digital darkroom, the computer is one of the most important tools a photographer will use. For years, the Mac Pro (née PowerMac) has been the pro’s tool of choice. Now radically redesigned, the new tower is just under 10 inches tall and comes in 3.7-GHz quad- ($2,999 from store. apple.com) and 3.5-GHz six-core ($3,999) configurations. The blazing PCIe-based flash memory for storage runs more than twice as fast as an SSD. Dual AMD FirePro D500 graphics cards can push pixels to up to three 4K or six Thunderbolt displays via an HDMI 1.4 port or the six-port Thunderbolt bus. The tubular thermal-core design requires only a single fan, but will limit most upgrades to your external devices. 61% of photo buyers say they try to hire new photographers 47 % of buyers at ad agencies say it’s important to hire a photographer who can also shoot video Source: PhotoShelter/Agency Access’ What buyers Want From Photographers 2013 survey KLyP-On The case included with Manfrotto’s Klyp system lets you mount your phone to most tripods. For many people, a smartphone has become their most-used camera. And while smartphone camera technology is rapidly improving, there’s still room for an extra boost—lenses can go wider and longer, and you often need a light when shooting at night. These add-ons can help augment your device’s picture-taking potential: Photojojo Pocket Spotlight $30 This 2.5x1.5- inch, uSB-charging LED mounts to your headphone jack. Photojojo promises up to an hour of light on a full charge, and an optional eight-pack of acrylic color filters can be used over the light or lens. Olloclip 4-in-1 Lens $70 Olloclip upgrades its iPhone lens system to four configurations from three. The wide-angle doubles the field of view; the fisheye does 180 degrees. Doff these and the mount becomes a macro setup, with 10X and 15X sides. Tether Tools TabStrap $90 This strap lets you sling a tablet across your neck or shoulders for quick access to all your apps while shooting (or assisting). It sports a locking aluminum carabiner for quick, secure fastening, but it works only with the Wallee case for apple iPad and Samsung Galaxy tablets (sold separately). Manfrotto Klyp $100 a continuous, soft, daylight-balanced LED panel for your iPhone, it’s paired with a case that has a 1/4-inch thread adapter that mounts on most tripods. at 3 feet from a subject, the panel is rated at 20 lumens, and a free iOS app lets you take photos by clapping. iPro Lens Series 2 Trio $229 The newest iPhone lens kit from Schneider Optics consists of three lenses (macro, super wide-angle, and 2X telephoto) that twist on and off a hard protective phone case. a multi-layer coating reduces flare, and the case for the lens serves as a grip or tripod mount. 18 popular photography January 2014 POPPHOTO.COM
  • 20. NOW AT A NEW LOW PRICE! Just $449 www.tamron-usa.com © Les Voorhis 270mm You’re not just taking pictures — you’re creating memories. The versatile Tamron 15X all-in-one 18-270mm lens effortlessly zooms from wide to telephoto so you’re able to capture all of your favorite people, places, and things without changing lenses. Just 3.8 inches long and weighing an ultra light 15.9 ounces, the compact lens is as easy to carry as it is to use. Vibration Compensation (VC) technology eliminates camera shake, while the Piezo Drive ensures faster, quieter precision autofocus. Don’t get frustrated with a basic kit lens when you’re trying to get closer to the important subjects in your life. Just one lens. For all life’s moments. (Model B008) For Canon, Nikon and Sony* DSLRs. *Sony mount does not include VC as stabilization is built into the Sony camera body. 18mm Just one lens for every moment.
  • 21. A UNIQUE RIDING AND PHOTOGRAPHY EXPERIENCE PROMOTION MARCH 5 - 7, 2014 Popular Photography and Cycle World, along with Sony, are excited to present a two-day motorcycle and photo/video event not-to-be-missed. Take this rare opportunity to merge your passion for riding with your desire to capture an amazing motorcycle experience. As a participant you will spend the weekend in Southern California alongside professionals honing your riding and photography skills, and learning from the best in the fi eld with your new Sony Action Cam (HDR-AS30V—a $299.99 value). Enjoy a fast paced track day at Chuckwalla Valley Raceway and a picturesque ride through Joshua Tree National Park. Cycle World Photo Director Jeff Allen, and a Sony professional photographer/videographer will be on-hand to help you document your experience. Cost $1,299—Includes a Sony Action Cam HDR-AS30V, all the weekends events: meet-and-greets, presentations, hands-on instruction, meals (two dinners and two lunches), private access to Chuckwalla Valley Raceway, entrance fees to each location during the event. Space is limited. Reserve your spot today. Photo: Jeff Allen Photo: Jeff Allen Photo: Jeff Allen Sony Action Cam (HDR-AS30V) In partnership with For more information, please call 888-647-2235 or visit imagingedge.com/workshops
  • 22. classic Botanical studies 22 shooting stars in puBlic 26 Your Questions answered 30 photo challenge Raw Food ana Luisa sziLagyi Dinner makes a pit-stop in a photographer’s home studio a while back, Ana Luisa Szilagyi started photographing “semi-transparent” fruits. She liked the results so much that the 36-year-old photographer from White Plains, NY, now shoots all kinds of things that have a bit translucence to them this way for her series called See Through… Her shot of a baby octopus, bought from a grocer, was inspired by her New Year’s menu, which led her to add sea-food, vegetables, and other ingredients to the growing series. “The octopus was my favorite,” Szilagyi says. “Its shape, texture, and translucence made it easy, and a beautiful one to photograph.” To accentuate the cephalopod’s translucent body, she shot in her kitchen against the light source (a strobe with a soft box, with a refector for fll) using a Nikon D800 and Tamron 28–75mm f/2.8 lens. Her exposure (1/80 sec at f/4.5, ISO 100) set the delicate tentacles off the crisp white background and managed to whet our carnivorous appetites—two reasons it won our challenge for your best food photography. —Matthew Ismael Ruiz In “the Man Who loves trees,” (page 52) charlie Waite shows off his gorgeous environmental tree portraits. Send us your best photos of trees by January 31—you could win $100, and your photo here. Read the rules at popphoto.com/Rules. POPPHOTO.COM january 2014 popular photography 21
  • 23. share * my project Classic Roots William Rugen is a commerical and fine-art photographer. See more at williamrugen. com. William RUgen has seen nature up closer than most—before transitioning into a photography career in 2005, he worked for nearly 20 years as a fisheries biologist. But his New Botanicals series was the Seattle-based pro’s first foray into plant life, inspired partly by his interest in the graphic quality of flowers and leaves as well as his lifelong interest in scientific prints. His inclusion in a 2009 group show prodded him to make new work and jump-started the project. “There’s something about seeing a plant out of its context that really shows its life,” says Rugen, who works full-time for Motofish Images. And seeing the roots, he adds, “shows you that there is a bit of ugliness needed to create anything of value.” His first subject, a daffodil— which has a relatively clean A photographer reinterprets botanical prints in the studio William Rugen (12); michael clinaRd (poRtRait) 22 popUlaR photogRaphy JanuaRy 2014
  • 24. bulb—gave him “an unrealistic view of how long the process can take,” he jokes. Most plants are much more difficult to prep. After hunting a subject out at a nursery, it can take him up to an hour to wash and prune roots that may be fragile—such as a heliotrope and a bleeding heart— or tangled, in the case of a shrub. From there, he has about an hour to shoot before his subject wilts, no easy feat with his setup. To create a “floating look,” he usually suspends these in front of colored backdrops using a Manfrotto Magic Arm, Super Clamps, and a fondue fork. He occasionally positions and reattaches leaves and stems with fishing wire. Rugen uses a mix of Profoto and Comet lights, along with foam-core for bounced fill, which usually requires some fussing. If the plant survives being planted afterwards in his garden, he adds, “it was a success.” Masking in Adobe Photoshop can take from 10 to 12 hours. But after seeing his first four prints on the gallery wall, Rugen was hooked. He has since continued the series and is now working with some local specialists on a new goal: capturing a small tree. Suspending plants, Rugen says, puts their above-ground elements into better proportion—typical garden views pay more attention to the flowers than the leaves. More importantly, seeing the roots, he says, “reminds you that its crazy tangle of material makes the complex plant you see.” —Lori Fredrickson Clockwise, from top left: spurge; New Zealand flax; ranunculus; hellebore; heliotrope; dusty miller; Alberta spruce; barberry; bleeding heart; calla lilly; daffodil; dahlia. popphoto.com popUlaR photogRaphy 23
  • 25. Working With the canon eos 5d Mark iii dslr caMera A LeAding Pro TeLLs His AmAzing sTory UyUni, Bolivia 16-35mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/60 sec JokUlsarlon, iceland 16-35mm, ISO 1600, f/2.8, 15 sec antarctica la Mer channel 28-135mm, ISO 800, f/3.5-5.6, 1/60 sec John Paul Caponigro is a world-renowned landscape photographer who considers himself an environmental artist. “Many see my fne art images as surreal,” observes Caponigro, “but I think it refects a universal visionary sensibility that is resurfacing in our culture. I relate to all of nature as a living thing, and my work is born out of a sense of wonder for being part of it all. My goal is to present sublime landscape experiences that remind us we’re a vital part of this miraculous planet.” “The frst image was taken on the Uyuni salt fats in Bolivia late in the day. After spending several days in the high deserts of the Altiplano (up to 15,000 feet altitude) and a full day on the largest salt fats in the world (up to 100 miles wide) we fnally found water, which mirrors the sky above. Up and down were so similar visually. Beneath a glassy liquid surface was a white crystalline surface cracked in patterns reminiscent of lightning bolts. The Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR camera paired with an EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM lens allowed me to take in more of the vast spaces I found myself in. The second image, of a magnifcent Aurora Borealis display, was taken in Iceland. Shooting the Aurora was a truly sublime moment—it was as though God was playing with a rheostat! I shot it on a tripod at ISO 1600 with the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM lens at an exposure of around 15 seconds. The fnal image, shot with an EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens, of a glaciated landscape, was shot near dark while slowly drifting through the La Mer Channel in Antarctica,” recalls Caponigro, “I think it conveys a sense of the extraordinary transcendent presence of the place.” “Capturing these images would have been impossible without my Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR, the camera I rely upon to create exceptional images under the most challenging conditions,” says Caponigro. “Its very clean high ISO performance is outstanding—it’s a game changer that gets me into a quality of light that has only recently been explored. The quality of the fles is magnifcent—I typically shoot up to ISO 1600 or ISO 3200 when I need to, but I’ve gone up to ISO 6400 with satisfying results. The Canon EOS 5D Mark III is solidly made for its class—durable, reliable, and its handling and ergonomics are excellent. Another important factor is the versatility and superb performance of Canon lenses, such as the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM lens that lets me take in these vast spaces I found myself in. However, the most crucial element is the Canon EOS 5D Mark III’s high ISO, low light capability that allowed me to handhold and work fast well past the time I would normally have to slow down and use a tripod. Equipment like this is what lets you get into the fow and stay in the fow. That means an increased success rate, which is what being a pro is all about.” For more stories on how Canon is empowering professional photographers visit: popphoto.com/behindthescenes For more inFormATion, visiT Usa.canon.coM/eos Advertisement Many viewers fnd Caponigro’s work profoundly spiritual, and his art has been exhibited internationally and is held in numerous collections including those of the Smithsonian and Princeton University. An authority on fne art printing, he authored Adobe Photoshop Master Class, leads workshops globally, has been extensively published worldwide, and is a member of the Photoshop Hall of Fame. Landscape images © John Paul Caponigro
  • 26. Benny Migs D4), two flashes, and three lenses. I usually use a lot of zooms for red carpet because you have more latitude—you can get a full-length and then maybe go in for a headshot. Two good red-carpet lenses are the Nikon 28–300mm f/3.5–5.6G VR and the 24–120mm f/4G VR. I also have a 70–200mm f/2.8G VR II, which I generally shoot with natural light on the D4. One camera will be for available light and one will have a flash. I can walk in anywhere and get something with that set-up. Any favorite celebs who consistently play along? Dustin Hoffman is not a huge seller, but he’s always friendly and gives something funny or silly. Tom Hanks doesn’t do anything different, but he’s very nice and accommodating. Mariah Carey, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Jennifer Lopez are all very good. The people who are professional and know they have to do their job are ideal; they know that we’re here to help whatever they’re doing. Then there are people who pose reluctantly—usually the younger stars. They actually have a more jaded attitude about it. How did you get started? I was working at a photo news agency called Gamma-Liaison back in the ’90s, editing photos, filing slides, and learning about the news business—what sold and what didn’t. Eventually, I was put in charge of the editing department. An entertainment photographer we had got sick, so we needed someone to fill in, and I did. He was a good friend, and willed me one of his lenses when he died—it was very emotional. I kind of took his spot shooting entertainment full-time. That’s how hard it was to get a spot in this business—someone had to die. —Interviewed by Jillian Mapes share * I, PHOTOGRAPHER Star Shooter Evan Agostini looks for genuine, expressive moments on the red carpet you often compete with other photographers in tight spaces. How do you get the best shot? At Invision Agency, which serves all of the Associated Press’ entertainment needs, I think in terms of the wire, and what I need to sell stock. A wire photo may tell more of a story and use more backdrop: a horizontal shot, natural light. For stuff that sells—stock—you want full-length fashion and headshots. Regardless, everyone wants eye contact—that’s why all the photographers yell. If you know a little bit about a person, you can say something more than “Look left!” or “This camera, please!” What else is challenging? I try to catch moments where two people are looking at or whispering to each other. There’s no secret to it—you just have to be observant and quick. Often, seeing the picture within the picture is important, too. Maybe you’re doing a full-length shot of a couple and they smile at each other, except you’re full-length. Zoom in to the three-quarter shot, and you can see their faces better. You catch the moment by cropping. What gear do you typically bring for a red-carpet shoot? I have a backpack, and I usually bring two Nikons (a D3S and a Entertain-ment photog-rapher Evan Agostini works for the Associated Press’ Invision Agency and is based in New York City. For a gallery of his celebrity photos, see PopPhoto. com/ agostini. 26 populAr pHotogrApHy january 2014 POPPHOTO.COM
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  • 28. WRiTE To uS! PoPPHoTo@BoNNiERCoRP.CoM Point & Shoot Bravo for your editorial “Embracing Limitations” (September 2013). We all love the latest gear and often require specialized items for specific projects. But as you so eloquently expressed, great images do not always require the latest or best gear. As a shooter for over 62 years, I learned a photographer has to make do with what is available a long time ago. Understanding composition and lighting are more important to creating good images than the latest camera, lens, light, or accessories. For the past dozen years, I always have an unassuming compact digital point-and-shoot camera with me, not my DSLR. That has allowed the capture of unexpected images which have been very lucrative. Keep up the good work in reminding readers while gear is important, it is not always the main ingredient in the creative process. Asher Pavel West Cornwall, CT share * LETTERS Take a look around you at any public event. Most people are now taking photos with their smartphones. Traditional point-and- shoot camera sales are nosediving, and DSLR sales will follow this trend. Professional photographers now routinely take an iPhone with them on assignments...even National Geographic photographers! Start publishing a monthly magazine pertaining to iPhone photography or devote a significant section in your magazine to this aspect. Gene Degenhardt via PopPhoto.com ediTor’s noTe: We’re not ready to launch a new magazine, but check out our smartphone gear, page 18. afTer reading Philip Ryan’s appraisal of the Nikon D5200 (May 2013), I talked myself into buying one. What a whole new game it is. Lowell Padgett Manassas, VA CorreCTion: In our Panasonic Lumix GX7 test (November 2013), we incorrectly said Panasonic does not use sensor-shift image stabilization. In fact, the GX7 is its first camera with this feature. We regret the error. how to contact us Address your questions or comments on editorial content to Popular Photography, 2 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016; e-mail, PopPhoto@bonniercorp.com. Published letters may be edited for length and clarity. We regret that we cannot answer all letters. Editorial contributions sent by mail must include return postage and will be handled with reasonable care; however, we assume no responsibility for return or safety of photographs, disks, or manuscripts. subscriptions Visit PopPhoto.com/cs for all subscription inquiries, call us at 800-876-6636, or email us at popularphotography@ emailcustomerservice.com. Please allow at least 8 weeks for a change of address; include both your old and new addresses, and if possible an address label from a recent issue. Subscription prices: U.S.: 1 year, $14; 2 years, $28; 3 years, $42. Canada: 1 year, $26; 2 years, $52; 3 years, $78. All other foreign: 1 year, $38; 2 years, $76; 3 years, $114. Occasionally we share our information with other reputable companies whose products and services might interest you. If you prefer not to participate, please contact us at popularphotography@ emailcustomerservice.com or popphoto.com/cs. reprints and eprints For Reprints email reprints@ bonniercorp.com. 28 popular phoTography january 2014
  • 29. edge imaging Presented by Sony and the publishers of Popular Photography & American Photo Fresh Perspectives on Digital Imaging © David McLain, Sony Artisan of Imagery PHOTOGRAPHY VIDEO GEAR TECHNIQUE LIFESTYLE edge hitRECord COLLABORATE WITH ACTOR JOSEPH GORDON-LEVITT Need for Speed ON LOCATION WITH CYCLE WORLD MAGAZINE Let’s Link Up! NOVEMBER 2013 From the publishers of Popular Photography & American Photo imagingedge.com CHAIN REACTION Available for Tablet and downloadable PDF © David McLain, Sony Artisan of Imagery Imaging Edge, an interactive digital imaging experience, is built from the ground up to keep our readers and imaging enthusiasts ahead of the rapidly changing world of photography. Dedicated to providing photo enthusiasts of all skill levels unprecedented access to information on state-of-the-art imaging products and the advanced technologies that are reshaping the imaging landscape, Imaging Edge will change the way you see, capture and share your view with the world. DOWNLOAD IMAGING EDGE imaging JOIN OUR CREATIVE CHAIN REACTION CRAFT A LASTING PHOTO CAREER INSPIRATION FROM DAVID MCLAIN Become a part of a unique visual storytelling project inspired by respected image makers who are committed to help elevate your photo game. DESTINATION WEEKEND WORKSHOPS Become an ‘Imaging Edge Insider’ and sign-up to work alongside world-renowned professional photog-raphers dedicated to improving your skills. Participants will experience an array of unique, pre-arranged photo opportunities in spectacular locales, often with private access.
  • 30. You Ask, We Tell This photo in your October 2013 issue (“New York, Forever Wild” by Chris Tennant) was very sharp, and I assume it was taken with the camera and lens mentioned, without any sharpening software. Is that the result of the camera, a Canon EOS 5D Mark II (vs. my EOS Rebel T2i)? In other words, is the size of the sensor, its better ability to collect light, the determining factor? John Meyland Clarkston, MI While the 5D Mark II certainly has an advantage over the Rebel T2i in tested resolution and low-light performance, we think your camera can capture a similarly sharp image at the size at which we ran it. Tennant's tips for sharper shots: Shoot RAW. RAW files contain much more info than a camera’s JPEGs, and when converted to no-compression or low-compression TIFFs, will maintain greater detail when displayed. Use a tripod. Tennant took no chances with camera shake, given the slowish 1/40 sec shutter speed. Set a low ISO. He shot at ISO 100 for the most resolution and least noise. Adjust contrast in editing to make the image pop. But don’t overdo it. Sharpen. Again, don’t overdo it. Remember, too, that some image-editing programs let you selectively sharpen different areas of the image for a more subtle effect. Right-Sizing When you right-click on the magnifier in Photoshop and click “print size,” 1 inch on the ruler actually equals 3/4 inch, and the image is likewise small. Which part doesn’t Adobe understand, inches or print size? Lawrence Harrison Whitewater, WI Photoshop assumes a screen resolution of 72dpi, and print size is displayed accordingly. If you enter your actual screen resolution in Photoshop’s Preferences > Units & Rulers, it will display print resolution more accurately. To figure out your screen’s res, visit pxcalc.com and follow the instructions. Fence Removal I enjoyed the “Zoo Keeper” I, Photographer (October 2013). Can you explain how Julie Larson-Maher shoots with a wide-open aperture through a fence to make it disappear? She suggested it for an animal, but I imagine it to be useful in other photo situations. Janet Gaines Great Neck, NY The goal is to get the fence so far out of the depth of field that it’s defocused to a vague haze. Look for subjects far behind the fence, stand as close to it as possible, and use the widest available aperture. Fast lenses (e.g. f/2.8) help, as do longer ones (at least 300mm in full frame). The best situation is to get close enough to a fence to shoot through the space between the bars. Button ShuFFle My Nikon D5200 can be set so that autofocusing and autoexposure are locked using different buttons. I would assume you’d always want to set the exposure simultaneously to the subject you’re focusing on. When would you lock them independently? Luis Alfaro San Salvador, El Salvador There are many situations in which you want to separate AF and AE lock by relocating either to a back button. By presetting the AF, shutter release can become near-instantaneous, so sports shooters commonly lock on a player—or the spot the player is likely to be in the next play—then fire the shutter at the peak of the action or when the composition is right. Conversely, an action shooter may want to lock in an optimal exposure, then let the AF track a subject moving through the frame. For these reasons, relocating AF or AE control is very often the first customization that a pro or advanced amateur will do on a camera body. Chris Tennant shot from atop Mt. Van Hoevenberg near Lake Placid, NY. He advises judicious sharpening and contrast boost post-production. “I often use a mask with my sharpening layer [in Adobe Photoshop] so that light areas of the scene get more sharpening than dark shadow regions,” he tells us. 30 populaR photogRaphy January 2014 POPPHOTO.COM CHris TennanT share * TECH TALK
  • 31. This may not be the safest location. Dusty and barren Idaho hard pack. And dead in front of 8,000 lbs of stampeding muscle. But this is when your focus sharpens. When the unpredictable can turn out utterly amazing. And the reward is well worth the risk, Just to get one shot. Finish strong. EPSON Stylus Pro 3880 – $1,295* EPSON Stylus Photo R2880 – $599.99* – Exhibition-quality prints from 13” to 17” wide – EPSON UltraChrome K3® with Vivid Magenta, used by the world’s leading photographers for stunning black-and-white and brilliant reds, blues and purples – MicroPiezo® print head technology for exceptionally precise ink droplet placement – World-class service from a dedicated support team epson.com/finishstrong * Prices are Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price. EPSON, EPSON Stylus, EPSON UItraChrome K3 and MicroPiezo are registered trademarks and EPSON Exceed Your Vision is a registered logomark of Seiko Epson Corporation. All other product and brand names are trademarks and/ or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Epson disclaims any and all rights in these marks. Copyright 2013 Epson America, Inc.
  • 32. Promotion with additional support from A CELEBRATION OF IMAGING & INNOVATION… © Cliff Hausner Pictured top, left to right: Andy Katz, Artisan; Jeff Berlin, Artisan; Brian Smith, Artisan; Robert Evans, Artisan; Matthew Jordan Smith, Artisan; Mike Kahn, Sony General Manager Partnership Marketing; Bottom, left to right: Fazia Ali, Kayla Lindquist, Sony Artisans of Imagery Program Director; Me Ra Koh, Artisan; Rosie Sandoval, Sony Sr. Marketing Manager
  • 33. Left image, left to right: Kelly Davis, Sony Vice President Digital Imaging Division; Miriam Leuchter, Editor-In-Chief, American Photo Right image: Attendees enjoy the spectacular photography of Sony’s Artisans of Imagery. Sony & American Photo: An Evening of Creativity, Recognition and Celebration In what has become one of the most anticipated events on the annual photo calendar, Sony, American Photo and Popular Photography welcomed more than 500 media analysts, professional photographers and industry infuentials to a celebration of imaging and innovation. With the iconic American Museum of Natural History as a backdrop, guests were treated to a diverse photographic exhibition featuring the visually arresting work of the Sony Artisans of Imagery. After a brief presentation ceremony in which Vice President Digital Imaging Divison, Kelly Davis accepted American Photo Editors’ Choice Awards on behalf of the Sony Cyber-shot RX1, RX1R, QX100 and QX10, guests admired the artwork, raised a glass to the future of photography and celebrated into the night. Left image, left to right: Mike Kahn, Sony General Manager Partnership Marketing; Dave Freygang, CEO, Bonnier Corp.; Rosie Sandoval, Sony Sr. Marketing Manager; Michael Gallic, Associate Publisher, Bonnier Corp.; Kelly Davis, Sony Vice President Digital Imaging Divison; Anthony Ruotolo, Bonnier Corp. Right image: Rosie Sandoval, Sony Sr. Marketing Manager; Eric Zinczenko, EVP, Bonnier Corp.; Bob Meth, West Coast Advertising Manager, Bonnier Corp. FOR MORE BEHIND-THE-SCENES PHOTOS, GO TO IMAGINGEDGE.COM/SONYPARTY © Benny Migliorino © Benny Migliorino © Benny Migliorino © Benny Migliorino
  • 34. Happy Holidays Made in the U.S.A. h Sold Exclusively at ReallyRightStuff .com 805.528.6321 | 888.777.5557
  • 35. Sue Tallon how experT TipS and TechniqueS For beTTer phoToS creative thinking Find more of Sue Tallon’s great studio work at www.suetallon .com. capture the magic of reflections; create moody still lifes 38 find winter’s best in idaho 40 master avedon lighting 42 48 tea party Play with your lighting to make reflections sing at first glance, Sue Tallon’s photograph of teapots appears to be something from the Mad Hatter’s tea party. Upon closer inspection, you might think that their crazy reflections and textures are the result of someone going a bit, well, crazy with Adobe Photoshop’s Liquify tool. In fact, Tallon’s image is more about creative lighting than crazed pixel pushing. The San Francisco-based advertising and commercial photographer was going for some kind of nonsensical look after returning from a visit to New York in which she’d seen the work of artist Jeff Koons. “I loved his hyper-large balloon animals with their amazing surface qualities and specular reflections,” she says. “I wanted to play around similarly with lighting the metallic surfaces of an ornate, Victorian-era tea set.” Commercial product photographers often use sophisticated lighting to PoPPHoTo.CoM january 2014 popular photography 35
  • 36. FiX it FaSt route B Tonal tweak + minor surgery NothiNg suits the Grand Tetons quite like black-and-white, but we found Austin L. Singer’s monochrome conversion a little too “crunchy,” jargon for overly sharp. So we imported the photographer’s original color JPEG into Adobe Photoshop CC, then opened it in the Alien Skin Exposure 5 plug-in and went with the Polapan b&w profile for its overall tonality. We added a red filter effect for greater separation between clouds and sky. Next we cropped to a 3:2 aspect ratio, lopping off a bit of the roadway in the process. And then we looked at the car. And looked. The white sedan was just too much of an eyeball magnet, so we used the “Repo Man” tool in Adobe Photoshop CC (actually, the Clone Stamp and Healing Brush) to remove it. Total fix time: 20 minutes. So readers: Artistic license or outrage? —Dan Richards CURVATURE OF FIELD austin L. Singer stood up through his car’s sunroof to capture the scene with a nikon coolpix aW1. exposure, 1/800 sec at f/3.9, iSo 125. b&W conversion in photoshop elements 10. PhOtO gLOSSarY HOW * creative thinking and Debbie Grossman a phrasE often encountered in promotional materials and tests of lenses, curvature of field occurs when the image plane cast by a lens is curved instead of flat. older lenses in particular can display this flaw, called spherical aberration, which makes it impossible to render the image of a flat surface that lies parallel to the focal plane in sharp focus across its entirety. When the image center is sharp, the edges won’t be; conversely, when the edges are sharp, the center will be soft. stopping down the lens usually lessens the aberration. Curvature of field is especially important to photographers shooting flat objects such as paintings, prints, currency, or documents. Macro lenses designed for shooting these types of subjects are referred to as flat-field lenses, and are typically free of curvature of field even at their widest apertures. auSTIn l. SInGer represent materials and surfaces realistically. The kinds of bright specular highlights that you see here, however, are often considered distracting and undesirable. But for Tallon, these highlights actually became her subject. As she saw in Koons’ highly reflective balloon sculptures, she wanted to tease out as much white as possible from the shiny surfaces of her tea service. She was pondering how to do this when inspiration hit in the aisles of an Ikea lighting department. “I’m a big fan of their cheap little lights, and they had a wand—a little 18-inch fluorescent tube—and I thought, ‘What if I handhold this instead of using a broad light source, and just drag the light around in a dark room with the shutter open?’” The lamp enabled her to imitate a broad light source while effectively painting light onto the metal surfaces. (Tallon also picked up her backgrounds at Ikea—reflective brushed-metal shelving she found in a remainders bin.) Using her Phase One 645DF+ camera body, Phase One P40+ digital back, and Schneider 80mm f/2.8 all tethered to her computer, it was easy to shoot and see where she needed to add light or raise the ambient illumination. (She had some of her studio’s fluorescent lights on to give the set a raw look.) The screen image showed her whether she needed to move the wand in a different direction, slow it down, or speed it up. She continued playing like this until she got a shot she liked. “It’s basically one $5 Ikea light,” Tallon laughs, proving undeniably that Wonderland can be found wherever inex-pensive Swedis h lights are sold. —Laurence Chen 36 popular photography january 2014 PoPPHoTo.CoM
  • 37. BEST OF the goods Great ideas in gear shop 1 the button to view products full screen 2 to rotate products 3 BUY IT NOW BUY IT NOW to purchase products download now for your iPad
  • 38. Frame Up Last august, on a white marlstone beach in southern Sicily, Leonardo Misuraca, a 29-year-old medical student from Rome, noticed as sunbathers around him began reaching for their cameras and taking pictures of a memorable sunset. “There was something magical in the light,” he recalls. “I wanted to capture it, too, but in a more original way than the others were doing.” He grabbed his Apple iPhone 4 and scanned the beach for something—anything!—that would make his image as special as the moment felt. Then he noticed the way the scene was reflected in his girlfriend’s sunglasses. “I love reflections,” he says. “They often show us something in a scene that we otherwise miss.” In this case, that something was the sharp and unsharp figures of sunbathers in his fore- and background. While shooting, the sunset was Misuraca’s subject, but later, the eyeglass reflections revealed something he hadn’t seen: pretty cool figure groupings, too. —Peter Kolonia Leonardo Misuraca used his iPhone 4’s program mode and spotmeter to capture this shot at 1/125 sec at f/2.8, ISO 100. Leonardo Misuraca QUICK TIP 30-SeCond SofTware how * TIPS & TrICKS Novoflex TrioPod what it is: a modular tripod system, the TrioPod has interchangeable three- or four-sect ion legs of aluminum or carbon fiber, as well as shorter tabletop-and convertible mono-pod and walking-stick legs. Pricing varies by component (see hpmarketingcorp.com for more info). why use it: among its other pluses, the system lets you up-grade over time. Start with aluminum legs, then step up to carbon fiber when your finances allow. what’s unusual about it: novoflex claims the optional three-part center column (shown) is significantly lighter and more stable than a conventional tripod center column. Use reflections to capture more of the world Books By iphone all too many of us shoot with our smartphones and end up with lots of photos that never see the light of day (or disappear after their moment in the instagram sun). For something more permanent, the new apple iPhoto for ios, now free with all new ios devices, lets you design and order printed books right from your phone or tablet. if you want to include high-resolution shots from other cameras, load them onto your phone before getting started. But downloads from, say, Facebook, will likely be too low-res to print. —Debbie Grossman 38 popuLar photography january 2014
  • 39. Costa Rica Video Workshop A look back at our v ideo a dv entur e With the awe-inspiring grandeur of the Arenal Volcano ever-present, the Mentor Series Costa Rica Video Workshop offered participants a spectacular array of once-in-a-life-time experiences and the priceless opportunity to capture them in broadcast-quality videos with the latest Nikon HD-DSLRs. After a brief hands-on equipment intro, we shot a team of fi ve professional kayakers navigating with incredible skill along the scenic Arenal River, and captured thrilling video of exotic wildlife while fl ying among the trees in a spacious gondola on the amazing Sky Tram. Trekkers had the choice of returning on foot or putting their sense of adventure to the test by experiencing the ultimate adrenaline rush on one of 10 Sky Trek zip-lines for an unparalleled 360-degree perspective of the rainforest. Using the features such as Full HD 1080p capture at 30 and cinematic 24/25 frames per sec, it was hardly a surprise the participants came away with a true video experience. That was only day one! On day two we got to use Nikon HD-DSLRs and lenses to capture hi-res stills and videos from the unique Arenal Hanging Bridges, and to walk along a 3-kilometer rain-forest trail and take in nature’s beauty with our eyes and cameras. In a video editing session we learned how to edit video clips into a complete production that tells a compelling story. In the afternoon, we visited a Butterfl y Conservatory dedicated to the preservation and study of the rainforest and its tropical species and got to photograph rare butterfl ies, exotic frogs, and other rainforest fl ora and fauna. Later that afternoon we experienced the awesome beauty of the La Fortuna Waterfall, a 70-meter-high cataract considered a national treasure, shot amazing videos of it, and captured videos and still images of beautiful birds, frogs, and reptiles in their natural habitats at the famed Arenal Ecological Park. Of course, our Costa Rica Video Workshop was a lot more than merely experiencing a unique and awesome environment and getting to capture it using top quality Nikon equipment. Under the able, empathetic, and always accessible guidance of seasoned mentor Reed Hoffmann, par-ticipants learned an incredible amount about camera control, lighting, and video pacing, and received precious tips on still and video photography, video production, and workfl ow that will allow them to create their own unique pro-quality videos going forward. “I learned an incredible amount in a very short time, made a lot of new friends, and created videos and images I will treasure forever,” commented one happy trekker. Once you experience the unique camaraderie of this seamlessly organized photographic adventure that also happens to be a total immersion course in visual expression, you’ll defi nitely be back for more. Sign up for our next video adventure in Minnesota, March 28-30, 2014 www.mentorseries.com ® Check out the video from this trek and more at mentorseries.com/video Nikon Pro Reed Hoffmann leads group during waterfall repelling video shoot. Trekker capturing the scene of farmers planting sugar cane. Special thanks to our premier sponsor: Come on a trek and try out some of the latest equipment that Nikon offers including their high-performance HD-SLRs, NIKKOR lenses, the Nikon 1 System, and a variety of COOLPIX compact digital cameras. Nikon pro Reed Hoffmann preps for video shoot Trekker captures video of waterfall D800 COOLPIX A D610
  • 40. GETTING AROUND Skiing full throttle from the top of Old Baldy is one way to see Sun Valley’s sights (albeit briefly), but it may not be conducive to snapping photos. Here are a few alternative modes for capturing the gorgeous scenery: ● SUN VALLEY NORDIC AND SHOWSHOE CENTER At the Sun Valley Club. Why not tour Sun Valley’s glories on snowshoes? Tours ($35, includes trail fee) are given every Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m. This outfitter also rents snowshoe and cross-country gear daily. Info: (208) 622-2250 ● SMILEY CREEK LODGE SNOWMOBILE TOURS AND RENTALS Smiley Creek Lodge, 16546 N Highway 75, Sawtooth City, ID. Tour more than 185 miles of groomed snowmobile trails or let a guide take you off-trail. Half- and full-day guided and self-guided packages available. Info: (208) 774-3547; smileycreeklodge.com ● SUN VALLEY RECREATION CENTER SLEIGH RIDES The Sun Valley Inn, 1 Sun Valley Rd., Sun Valley. It’s hard to imagine a better perch for shooting the snowy scenery than from under a warm blanket (supplied) as a pair of big horses do all the work. Half-hour rides ($24 per person) depart the Inn on Wednesdays and Saturdays, starting at 10:45 a.m. Info: (208) 622-2135 ● SUN VALLEY TREKKING 703 1st Ave. N, Hailey, POPPHOTO.ID If you’re COM an advanced skier and would like to tour a remote alpine ridgeline or grab Sun Valley landscapes not available to most photographers, consider a backcountry powder day tour. This company also specializes in customizing backcountry skiing journeys, hut-to-hut skiing (including deep-heat soaks in a wood-fired hot tub), yurt rentals, and other wilderness adventures. Info: (208) 788-1966 TORY TAGLIO Tory Taglio shot this night view of Ketchum, ID, Sun Valley’s hub, with a tripod-mounted Nikon D700 and 24–70mm f/2.8 Nikkor zoom at 2.5 sec, f/10 and ISO 250. HOW * TRAVELING PHOTOGRAPHER Idaho’s Sun Valley shines during the winter months Stun Valley “ANY VIEW of Baldy is iconic,” states Idaho photographer Tory Taglio (torytagliophotography. com) of Sun Valley’s majestic Bald Mountain, Idaho’s ski magnet. “A morning view from the deck of the Sun Valley Nordic Center offers ski trails in the foreground with the towering mountain behind.” Evening and sunset, he says, are great times for landscape lovers: “Alpenglow gives the snow a hue of saturated magenta or pink just before sunset,” he says. For panoramas, take the gondola (non-skiers welcome) up to the Roundhouse Restaurant’s deck. Action shooters flock to nearby Dollar Mountain where extreme skiers work on their games. “Dollar offers half pipes and a terrain park where athletes and locals provide nonstop photo ops,” he says. The world-class half pipe is only 100 yards from the lodge, so access is easy for photographers. For alpine scenery, Taglio suggests driving out to Trail Creek Road just north of the resort. “Try shooting the beaver ponds four miles from town, with Trail Creek Pass in the background,” he says. Best time: the golden hour, with snow-covered peaks bathed in gorgeous light. Also nice? Proctor Mountain Trail, a snowshoe hike from the Trail Creek Cabin Restaurant. “Sunrise hikes will reward you with stunning views of all Sun Valley,” Taglio says. And finally, action shooters can hone their skills at the 2014 Sun Valley Nordic Festival (January 25 to February 2). It celebrates Nordic (a.k.a. cross-country) skiing with races, snowbike races, demonstrations, a film festival, and a bonfire with costumed revelers. —Jeff Wignall 40 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY JANUARY 2014 POPPHOTO.COM
  • 41. Choose your focus and we’ll focus on you. Online education with a professional mentor. One to one training that makes you a better photographer. CALL OR GO ONLINE TO GET STARTED TODAY WWW.NYIP.EDU/POP | 1.800.445.7279
  • 42. h o w * lighting S.L. Dixon 42 popular photography january 2014
  • 43. Dixon used a Canon EOS 5D Mark II and 50mm f/1.4 Canon EF USM lens for this shot, exposing for 1/160 sec at f/5.6, ISO 500. For more of his portraits, see sldixon.com. s. l. dixon, an Australian school teacher by day and part-time portraitist most other times, is drawn to “less-than-mainstream subjects,” he says. Burlesque dancers, roller derby skaters, and, as in the portrait here, ink aficionados are his typical quarry. To document them, he uses a lighting style that smacks of the great Richard Avedon. “I choose Avedon’s lighting because it’s very clean and simple, with even highlights and shadows across the figure. Drama isn’t evoked by the lighting. The subject brings that to the picture,” says Dixon. So what’s an Avedon lighting setup? Google the phrase, and the Internet coughs up a dozen different combinations of front, back, and fill lights, often with baffles and reflectors. Avedon himself deployed his light differently, depending on the circumstances. (See the essential book Avedon at Work: In the American West by Laura Wilson; Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, 2003.) While lighting setups vary, the look doesn’t: you need a bright white background, even illumination across the subject, open shadows, snappy contrast, and absolutely no flare compromising the figure’s edges. So strongly is this style associated with Avedon that among some shooters his name has morphed into a verb, as in “I Avedoned three subjects today.” Master avedon lighting Dixon especially likes the look because “the subjects are removed from any context, and the focus is placed entirely on them, their attire, demeanor, and expression,” he tells us. One of the hallmarks of this lighting style is the soft, often indirect main light. “The key is getting the indirect light as even as possible across the subject,” says Dixon. When the main light is too high, the result is a bright D head and face, and lighting that quickly falls off for the rest of the figure. “With practice, it becomes easy to see and fix the problem,” he says. Often, all that’s required is a strategically placed reflector. Another problem? Flare from the bright white background can lighten subject edges. The fix: Throw less light on the background and/or move your subject forward, away from it. —Peter Kolonia simple complex kriS hoLLanD/mafic StuDioS (iLLuStration) Try Avedon lighting for your next portrait PoPPhoto.com popular photography 43 B A C To give his portrait the Avedon look, S.L. Dixon chose one of the easiest setups for producing it based on indirect sunlight. He began by gaffer-taping bright white seamless paper (A) to a west-facing exterior brick wall (B). With the morning sun coming from the east, the wall cast a shadow (C) into which Dixon placed his subject. Because the lighting across the subject would become top-heavy as the sun rose, Dixon worked fairly quickly. He carefully positioned the subject far enough from the background so as not to see flare around the figure, but not so far forward that the subject was closer to direct sunlight and therefore too brightly lit. To prevent skintones from blowing out, he closed down 0.67 stop over the spot-meter reading recommended by his Canon EOS 5D Mark II (D). Dixon likes this setup because, “I’d become sick of lugging lights and gear from shoot to shoot, and rigging complicated setups. This more simple setup lets me focus on my subject.” Savage Super White Seamless ($45, street) Canon EOS 5D Mark II (now III) ($3,399, street) White Out
  • 44. how * software workshop simple complex dan bracaglia First Things First Here’s where to begin when editing a photo editing programs, even if Dan Bracaglia captured Jim Testa, music critic for New Jersey paper The Star Ledger, for a series on the local music scene shot for Bracaglia’s own site, TheLondon Broil.com. sometimes, when you first bring an image into your editor, it’s hard to know what to do— especially when it needs lots of work. There are many ways to proceed, but we’ve found it best to start with the big, quick adjustments and progress to the finer ones. Fixing issues such as low contrast and bad color casts can go a long way, and once those are finished, it’s easier to judge the amount of saturation you’ll need to add or subtract (if any) and whether a crop is in order. Then it’s time for any necessary retouching and other touch-up work. Finally, when all of that’s accomplished, you can sharpen. These instructions use Adobe Photoshop CC, but tools for these fixes are available in most of the more serious image- 44 popular photography january 2014 their interfaces will appear slightly different. It’s useful to note that when doing a RAW conversion, tools for fixing the same issues are also available, and it’s a good idea to proceed in the same general order. No matter what kind of image you’re working on, these tips will help get you started. —Debbie Grossman afTer
  • 45. 1 2 3 Step 1 Whenever you open an image in Photoshop, duplicate your Background layer first. This preserves the original (for reference and other purposes). Next make brightness and contrast adjustments. Create a Levels Adjustment Layer, then slide the white triangle to the left to set a white point and the black slider to the right to set a black point. Generally, place the triangles where the histogram begins or ends. Finally, move the middle slider left to brighten. Step 2 Adding contrast helps, but doing so makes it clearer what a strong yellow (and slight magenta) color cast this photo has. Make a Curves Adjustment Layer, then use the pulldown menu to select the Blue Channel. Drag the blue curve up to add more blue to the image, thus reducing the overabundance of its opposite color, yellow. Then do the same for the Green Channel to tone down its opposite, magenta. The result is more neutral. Add Midtone Contrast After adjusting color, select RGB, then add midtone contrast by creating a subtle S-curve toward the lower center of the graph. Step 3 To add more excitement to this photo, create a Vibrance Adjustment Layer. Then crank it up. The beauty of Vibrance for portraits is that you can add a lot without ruining skintones or making the picture look too unnatural. Try moving the Saturation slider for comparison’s sake—note that your image can quickly verge on the garish. POPPHOTO.cOM popular photography 45
  • 46. how * software workshop Step 4 To see what your image would look like with less distortion, click on your Background Copy Layer to select it, and go to Filter > Lens Correction. (You won’t see the result of your adjustment layers in this filter’s preview.) Since the portrait subject is in the sweet spot of this lens, the distortion in this shot actually adds to its look, so click cancel to leave it as is. Still, the shot is distractingly crooked, so grab the Crop tool and click on the Straighten tool in the Options Bar. Draw a line parallel to something that should be horizontal. Then finish by cropping in and hitting Enter on your keyboard to accept. Step 5 Now on to retouching. Create a new, blank layer to get rid of spots caused by sensor dust. Hit J to grab the Spot Healing Brush (type Shift + J to toggle between types of Healing Brushes). Check Sample All Layers, and turn on Content-Aware. Make your brush just bigger than the spot, and click to remove. If your subject has blemishes you wish to retouch, remove them using the same technique on their own layer. Now’s the time, also, to do any other retouching your image requires. Final Step Before you sharpen, create a new top layer that combines the layers below. Type these two keyboard commands, in order: Ctrl (Command on a Mac) +Shift + C, Ctrl (Command) + Shift + V. If you’ve set up Photoshop to show the proper print size (see Tech Talk on page 30 for more), go to View > Print Size to sharpen for print. Then go to Filter > Sharpen > Smart Sharpen. Resize the window if necessary. Then check Preview to compare how your image will look at print size versus close up. This image has little noise, so you can get away with a high Amount setting, a low Radius setting, and just a bit of noise reduction. 46 popular photography january 2014 4 5 6
  • 47. 7642 Woodwind Drive Huntington Beach, CA 92647 Call 714.849.5700
  • 48. Rainy Daze 48 popular photography January 2014 amy Weiss For amy Weiss, an American fine-art photographer living and working in Melbourne, Australia, the best still-life images create a strong feeling or mood. For this photo, the feeling is clearly expressed in her title: “Rainy Days.” “I love them. I love the moodi-ness, sounds, soft light, and cozy feelings I associate with rainy days. I tried to put all that in this image, which ironically, wasn’t taken on a rainy day at all,” says the photographer. Instead, Weiss waited for an overcast day when the light was soft and free of deep shadows or overly bright highlights. She placed her subjects on a living room window sill and hung a thin sheet of transparent plastic in front of them. To recreate the feeling of a rainy afternoon, she sprayed a mist of water from an atomizer across the plastic until “rain drops” formed. For all her still lifes, Weiss relies exclusively on natural window light. “When I first started out in photography, I couldn’t afford lighting equipment, so I learned how to improvise,” she says. Here are a few of her helpful For more of Weiss’s decorative and fine-art still lifes, go to amy-weiss. artist websites. com. how * You can do it
  • 49. tips for creating a moody still life: •Pick simple subjects. Weiss suggests starting with a few simple, timeless objects that viewers will find familiar, even comforting. •Position the objects with care. “I placed the leafed pear and bottle closest to the plastic, while the other pears were set an inch back. That gave me a sharp focal point in the lettering on the bottle, while simple CompleX POPPHOTO.COm popular photography 49 Using the aperture priority mode in her Canon EOS 40D, Weiss exposed for 1/4 sec at f/8, ISO 100. Step 1 pick your subjects. Stick to antique or vintage objects with interesting shapes, colors, textures, and evocative or nostalgic associations. Step 2 Find a location. In the days prior to your shoot, walk through the rooms in your home at different times of day looking for the best combination of soft, bright, natural light and clear, uncluttered backgrounds. Step 3 gather your gear. Weiss says that almost any camera can be used, but recommends a close-focusing macro lens, tripod, and a reflector to open up shadows and reveal detail. Avoid wide-angle optics, which can distort your subjects’ shapes. “I use my 100mm f/2.8 macro lens for all my still lifes,” says Weiss. “It’s very sharp with critical detail, while rendering a soft, beautiful bokeh when I use a shallow depth of field.” Step 4 arrange your subjects. Using fewer objects will make arranging them easier. Take test shots to see what groupings and arrangements work best. Try to place each item in a flattering, revealing, or visually pleasing manner. Keep shooting and rearranging until you’ve exhausted the possibilities. Favor wider apertures to throw distracting detail out of focus. Final Step tweak it in editing. Adjust sharpness, color balance, contrast, and exposure. Also consider adding a texture layer—as Weiss did here— to introduce a mottled or painterly quality to the photo. A B Weiss mounted a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 macro lens on her Canon EOS 40D, since replaced by the 60D (A), and then threaded the rig onto a Manfrotto 190CXPRO3 tripod (B) for her exposure. rendering the rest of scene gauzy and dreamlike,” says Weiss. •Compose for intimacy. Weiss wanted the objects to feel within reach. To get the look, she squared her camera to the window sill, cropped tightly, and made sure there was engaging detail, like droplets and textures, to grab and hold a viewer’s attention. —Peter Kolonia
  • 50. GREECE 2014 © Sofia Spentzas April 29th-May 8th © Suzanne Trottier © Sofia Spentzas © Suzanne Trottier
  • 51. Preserved in history and mythology, Greece is a land of centuries-old civilizations and unparalleled natural beauty. In April 2014, the Mentor Series travels to Greece with Nikon professional photographers Layne Kennedy and David Tejada for a memorable photo series in Athens, Meteora, Santorini, and Rhodes. The birthplace of drama, democracy, and philosophy, Athens is a bustling metropolis and the center of economic, political, and cultural life in Greece. Our tour of Athens will include stops at Hadrian’s Arch and the Temple of the Olympian Zeus. We’ll photograph the presidential guard (or evzones) in their traditional uniforms and visit the House of Parliament, Constitution Square, and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. No tour of Athens would be complete without a visit to the Acropolis. Seated high above the city, its shimmering, white-marble Parthenon is one of the most recognizable structures in the world. In Meteora, we will view the picturesque peak-top monasteries, which were constructed on these peaks as early as the fourteenth century. Our next stop will be Santorini, a volcanic island in the southern Aegean Sea known for its stunning sunsets and the whitewashed houses perched along its cliffs. We will arrange for an afternoon photographing the island, with its black sand beaches and magnificent blue lagoon, followed by a sunset shoot with your mentors. The island of Rhodes, known historically as the site of the Colossus of Rhodes, has extensive archaeological sites, abundant beaches, and a preserved medieval town for us to explore. Join the Mentor Series for this unforgettable photography workshop in Greece. Sign up today! © Suzanne Trottier © Suzanne Trottier © Carl Fredrickson SCHEDULED TO APPEAR Limited to 20 students per mentor Special thanks to our premier sponsor: DAVID TEJADA NikonNet Fortune LAYNE KENNEDY National Geographic Traveler Smithsonian LAND ONLY WORKSHOP COST: $4,299 Includes accommodations based on double occupancy, breakfast daily, entrance fees, high speed ferry to Santorini – economy class, (3) domestic flights, English-speaking guides, transportation to all shooting locations, government and security taxes and fees, daily lecture series, presentations, and group review sessions. ® D800 COOLPIX A D610 Come to Greece and try out some of the latest equipment that Nikon offers including their high-performance HD-SLRs, NIKKOR lenses, the Nikon 1 System, and a variety of COOLPIX compact digital cameras. REGISTER AT MENTORSERIES.COM For more information, call toll-free 888-676-6468. WITH ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM: FOLLOW US ON Mentor Series Ultimate Photo Adventure
  • 52. 52 popular photography january 2014
  • 53. Man Who Loves The Trees “Landscape photographers have a love affair with trees,” notes Charlie Waite, the celebrated British photographer whose scenic studies over many years reveal his deep reverence for the subject. Here he tells us about his distinctive approach to picturing trees in the landscape. Photos and text by Charlie Waite VaLenSoLe, France rows of lavender lead the eye to a lone tree in near-silhouette. charlie Waite used a Hasselblad 500cM with 50mm f/4 carl Zeiss Distagon lens to make the exposure on Fujichrome Velvia 50. ButterMere, cuMBria, u.K. a shaft of sidelight cutting through the mist defines a lone tree against the mountain. the photographer used a nikon D700 with 24–120mm f/4g aF-S nikkor lens to make the exposure of 1/60 sec at f/16, iSo 200. POPPHOTO.COM popular photography 53
  • 54. Whether en masse or standing nobly on their own, trees play a huge environmental and emotion-al role in all of our lives. The tree, in many parts of the world, is our seasonal barometer. If we are lucky enough to have a tree in our gar-den, we will know its character and personality and enjoy a real and meaningful relationship with it. Because of our familiarity with trees—their height, girth, color, and shape—they play a crucial role in providing the viewer of a landscape photograph reference points for depth, distance, and dimension within the image. (I call this DDD.) Trees help to delineate the landscape and, as with cloud shadows, can create a three-dimensional effect in photographs. Framing It Up A tree needs to express its char-acter, its setting, and its sense of nobility. Trees in random volume don’t speak to me. But trees in an orderly, regimented design do. Therefore, I am always looking for the tree that stands alone or trees in an organized collection. There is no telling where those might be, so I often spend hours driving in search of them. There is no typical shot setup: Each potential image brings with it a different set of considerations involving design, shape, pattern, color, relationships, depth, and so on. Symmetry plays a role, too. I am careful to avoid verticals bisecting horizontals, if I can. In all situations, a tripod is mandatory. A wide-angle lens can suggest that the area being photographed is more expansive than it really is, and the eye and the brain can detect whether the lens used was extremely wide. The lens that I like to use, and did for many of these images, is the 50mm lens on a 6x6cm camera (roughly the eqivalent of 28mm on 35mm format) because to me, it seems to equate to human vision. My other lens preference is short telephoto, as I don’t care to compress planes within a landscape too extremely. I want viewers to feel that if they were standing by my side, their vision would match my own. Many of my landscape photographs are in a square, or nearly square, format. The square promotes the tree as a center-stage player, given that space above, below, and to the sides can be of even proportions. Light and Season Lighting, the catalyst to all photog-raphy, should be at the forefront of any photographer’s mind. Front light produces fat, unatmo-spheric, sterile, shallow images. But backlighting is excellent for silhouettes, particularly if the shape of winter branches offers Lot, France the light above suggests a wine bottle. Waite used an 80mm f/2.8 carl Zeiss Planar lens on a Hasselblad 500cM with Fujichrome Velvia 50 film. DaMMe, BeLgiuM trees fade into mist for the shot, center, made with a nikon D3S and 24–120mm f/4g aF-S nikkor lens, at full tele for mild com - pression. exposure: ¼ sec at f/22, iSo 200. 54 popular photography january 2014
  • 55. great design and rhythm. Direct overhead light—which photographers often reject—can deliver pools of shadow that can be very intriguing. I used this tech-nique in the image of the “bobble trees” on page 56. Mist, rain, and overcast conditions can provide images that convey atmosphere, as in the photo of the tree avenue in Damme, Belgium, above. In northern climes, we seek the ravishing yellows and reds of fall color, bringing thousands to gawp and wonder—for those scream-ingly vivid colors, the photographer will travel hundreds of miles. The winter months can trans-form the tree to create a skeletal and often haunting look, with its naked branches perhaps fringed with snow. Many a landscape photographer enjoys the near-monochrome look of the decidu-ous winter tree and may prefer its boniness to an evergreen slumped under the weight of snow. In winter, the shape of the branches, which at any other time play a secondary role, now have to be considered for their form and their muscular nature. Onward to the moist and shiny leaves of spring, refecting so much infrared radiation that infrared photography enthusiasts can have a feld day taking the viewer straight back to winter. With my color photography, I often trip myself up by using a polarizing flter to remove the white-light refection from some of the refec-tive leaves, only to fnd that green, one of the trickiest colors to render correctly, turns almost fuorescent. You would think I would have learned by now! Then to the summer swelling of our trees, where the muscular limbs of the mighty oaks can barely be seen through the many thousands of leaves. (I have learned that an average-sized oak will drink 50 gallons of water per day.) In my experience, the fully-leafed summer tree can look lumpy and without form, render-ing the landscape thick, dense, and hard to delineate. For these reasons, summer in the northern hemisphere is my least favorite season for photographing trees. Don’t Overdo It The brain and the eye are an amazing double act. Together, they are able to detect falsity and unrealistic colors, and on doing so go into automatic reject mode. Thus the polarizer is a danger-ous flter. It isn’t just the sky, the water, and the land that it affects; it is all of them at differ-ent times, in different lighting scenarios. Look through the polarizer off-camera to establish the effect it has on everything before deciding whether to use ÉPernay, France Waite used Fujichrome Velvia 50 film (as usual) to capture the saturated fall reds in this tree avenue, above. He shot with the Hasselblad with the 50mm f/4 carl Zeiss Distagon lens. POPPHOTO.COM popular photography 55
  • 56. aMienS, France Waite used a polarizer on a 50mm f/4 carl Zeiss Distagon lens to reduce reflections from the water. exposure was on Fujichrome Velvia 50 in a Hasselblad 500cM body. it or not. Remember that the polarizer reduces white-light refection and can increase contrast. With a cloudless sky, it can produce unrealistic violet or indigo blues. Graduated (split) neutral-den-sity flters, on the other hand, may be crucial in order to reveal, in high contrast scenes, subtle nuances in the sky that the pho-tographer wishes to preserve. Getting it right in the camera is its own reward, but digital manipulation is not a crime. Yet its use should be as an enhance-ment of the photographer’s artistic intention. Contrast, minimal sharpening, and minor cleansing are all that I would recommend. Like sharpening, increased saturation should be applied with great care. This past fall, I found myself in Colorado thinking that no one would accept the natural rendition of yellow, no doubt accusing me of massive over-saturation. What is a landscape photographer to do except sub-due the colors of nature at the risk of being thought dishonest and fraudulent? On the Avenue Whichever season it may be, trees will more often than not arrest the photographer, and it is no secret that my “tree fx” often comes with a tree avenue. If anyone shares my love of an avenue of trees, it seems to me to be important to maintain the secrecy and mystique by deny-ing the outside world a look in. A chink of light seen high up in the frame, be it from the blue sky or a white-sky highlight, may serve to undermine the feel of a majestic nave of a cathedral. I remember years ago making an image of an avenue of trees that offered a perfect shape of a bottle of white wine at the far end (seen on page 54) and, without wishing to sound too fanciful, it seemed to me to haul the viewer through, and outward, toward the bright light of hope. I shall be forever attracted to the tree avenue and always fnd myself evaluating its uniformity before I commit to setting up; it’s no good having a gap where a tree may have been felled, and where a stream of light may attract the eye to a break of continuity. But what landscape photogra-pher can resist the lonely tree? I know that I am unable to do so. Charlie Waite has just launched the USA Landscape Photographer of the Year competition, for which Popular Photography serves as a media sponsor. For details, see usaland scape photographeroftheyear.com. ticino VaLLey, itaLy a stand of trees (top right) contrasts with the field’s golden tones. Same equipment and film as in the amiens image. ronDa, anDaLucia, SPain overhead light creates a near-abstraction (lower right). Same camera and film, this time with 250mm f/5.6 carl Zeiss Sonnar lens (roughly 140mm in 35mm). 56 popular photography january 2014 POPPHOTO.COM
  • 57. Stunning, Vibrant Prints That Endure the Test of Time MetalPrints Stunning Prints on Aluminum Annie K. Rowland apertureacademy.com cmphoto.co.nz Float Frame Flush Frames Double Float Metal Easel Option 5/8" & 1" Stainless Posts For Exceptional Image Stability MetalPrints™ are made by infusing dyes directly into specially coated aluminum sheets. This creates an image with a magical luminescence, vibrant colors, incredible detail, and exceptional archival qualities. The surface is easy to clean, waterproof and scratch resistant. Choose from High Gloss, Satin, Sheer-Matte, or Sheer-Glossy surfaces. Available in any/every size up to 43x96 with contemporary mounting and framing options. Learn more at bayphoto.com/metalprints 25% OFF Your First Order! *Get 25% of your frst order with Bay Photo Lab! For instructions on how to redeem this special ofer, fll out the New Customer Account Request form at bayphoto.com. steveharrington.net apertureacademy.com NEW! matthofmanphotography.com
  • 58. Game Changer Sony AlphA 7R This one came way out of left feld—thrown to home plate by a mighty arm. The Sony Alpha 7R represents not only the most substantial refnement of the interchangeable-lens compact (ILC) camera to date, but also a redefnition of the entire concept of the high-end system camera. The camera that best refned or redefned photography in 2013? Unquestionably, it is the diminutive (but full-frame) high-resolution Sony Alpha 7R. 58 popular photography january 2014 By Dan Richards satoshi

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