And the results are….
No drumroll please! Just a look at the test results….
Sheelagh Lucas SPED 232
There is no easy way to tell a parent their child is not
typical, may never be typical, that the child needs
assistance....
My little boy today…. Eating
cookies at a school field trip to the
fire station… surrounding by
classmates, his sister,...
Wording is EVERYTHING!
 There is nothing harder to hear
than the test results that cement a
child’s life. These papers...
Learning your child has ADD is
also upsetting…
Two years after being approached by my
daughter’s kindergarten teacher, ...
The moral of this story? You are about to
change someone’s life. Treat this with the
respect and empathy it deserves.
A phone call to set up the meeting, or an
email or letter if calling does not work can
help get the ball rolling….
 Th...
Approaching the situation can be
tricky… how do we start?
 “Tell me how you are feeling today?
 “How has Alek been?” ...
Be friendly, helpful, supportive….This is what it
looks like to a parent at a meeting….
….sure they look friendly enough...
When it came time for results… keep the
tissues and empathy at hand!... But the kids?
That depends on the situation.
 ...
I have a new rule… about
meeting everyone testing my
child before the testing begins…
With Aleksander, the school
psyc...
How do I make them trust me? Why would
they NOT? I am the school official!
 This trust is deeply rooted in the
need fo...
Take the time to make me feel as though you
cherish my child… not as though he/she is a burden!
 Take the time to point...
What if I don’t talk to the parents
regularly? I don’t always have time!
 It takes 30 seconds to jot a note,
or send a...
I have a big family, remember my one child in your class… not my only concern in
life! If you can, remember to take two m...
I know it seems like a lot. But this is not an every day
occurrence. So do not feel like we need to discuss
everything e...
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Presenting results to parents

Building relationships with families
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Presenting results to parents

  • 1. And the results are…. No drumroll please! Just a look at the test results…. Sheelagh Lucas SPED 232
  • 2. There is no easy way to tell a parent their child is not typical, may never be typical, that the child needs assistance. But there is definitely a right way, and a wrong way.  “I do not think he will ever be able to talk.”  “He will probably never be in regular classes with regular kids.”  “We never really know what is going to happen…. But he is one of the worst I have seen, lately.” -SLP with ESU 16, who evaluated Alek at 25 months  “If Alek were in a room with 100 little boys, his same age, and just like him, he would be able to communicate better than 2 of them.”  “Remember, this is just a standardized test, it does not tell us anything, except he has some work ahead of him.” -SLP in a private therapy group, who evaluated Alek at 26 months.
  • 3. My little boy today…. Eating cookies at a school field trip to the fire station… surrounding by classmates, his sister, and fifty other children from area preschools. Our first prognosis was so grim, as a parent I could not stop crying for two days. My heart was broken, I felt devastated, and for the next year and a half, I refused to work with the local ESU. My family chose a different route. As we prepared him for preschool, we were forced to reevaluate the ESU, and discovered a very different atmosphere. One I am thankful for. One filled with SLPs, OTs, and Preschool Teachers who are helping fulfill my hopes and dreams for my son. The first SLP who evaluated Alek no longer works in the area.
  • 4. Wording is EVERYTHING!  There is nothing harder to hear than the test results that cement a child’s life. These papers are more than results, they are a tiny window into the planning, worrying, and work that will go into the next few years. Or even their lifetime.  But Autism verification or other high level disability verifications are not the only troublesome diagnosis.
  • 5. Learning your child has ADD is also upsetting… Two years after being approached by my daughter’s kindergarten teacher, concerned her “daydreaming” and lack of focus were a bigger issue, we finally had Lisselle tested by a local clinical psychologist. With a working memory in the 40%, processing speed at 2% and intellectual ability at 98%, Dr. Kimzey was as surprised at Lisselle as we were. But despite the fact that we had done interventions for two years, prior to testing, then already expected the diagnosis… the confirmation was crushing. It opened up a whole new world of questions and concerns.
  • 6. The moral of this story? You are about to change someone’s life. Treat this with the respect and empathy it deserves.
  • 7. A phone call to set up the meeting, or an email or letter if calling does not work can help get the ball rolling….  The phone call should be positive!  Even if the results are significant, now is not the time to worry parents.  But make sure you set up a meeting quickly… scheduling them too far away causes the parent A LOT of anxiety  Make sure you allot plenty of time for the meeting, if there is a lot to discuss, no one should feel pressured to finish up, or that they will not have a chance to discuss the situation thoroughly.
  • 8. Approaching the situation can be tricky… how do we start?  “Tell me how you are feeling today?  “How has Alek been?”  “Is there anything you want to say before we get started?” Questions can be a great way to kick start the conversation!  “I really enjoyed working with Alek!”  “During testing {insert cute anecdote here} happened! It was so fun!”  “Alek has SO much personality!”  “I can not believe how well he reads!” A positive statement of the child goes a long way! Casually acknowledging their strengths is also a great way to help the parents feel like you are “on their team”
  • 9. Be friendly, helpful, supportive….This is what it looks like to a parent at a meeting…. ….sure they look friendly enough, but I know they have all been sitting around discussing my son, and my family, and his home life, and now I see that one gave that one a look…. And what are they thinking?!?!
  • 10. When it came time for results… keep the tissues and empathy at hand!... But the kids? That depends on the situation.  Alek never attends the meetings. There is not a need. He would be a distraction to us and the staff…  Lisselle was present in the psychologists office when he gave us the evaluation. She was in the room the entire time! At eight, we and Dr. Kimzey felt as though she should feel as included in the discussion as possible, because it included her. We are waiting for her 504 plan meeting… she will probably NOT be present at that meeting.
  • 11. I have a new rule… about meeting everyone testing my child before the testing begins… With Aleksander, the school psychologist came in to complete his testing for an Autism verification. I never had the opportunity to meet her or talk to her before the testing. Sitting across the table, I was VERY conflicted by her presence. I needed to feel like she was “on” my team. And I did not. Since, I have requested to make sure I have one face to face… HI! The day of testing… this makes me feel a lot more comfortable. I want to feel like the person across the table sees my son as more than a number, that she sees US as a family.
  • 12. How do I make them trust me? Why would they NOT? I am the school official!  This trust is deeply rooted in the need for a team feeling. I want to feel as though every single person in my son’s school is on his team. I want to know he is getting the BEST treatment, the BEST compassion… I know how frustrating his meltdowns are… but I want the teacher to feel only concern, caring, and determination for him!
  • 13. Take the time to make me feel as though you cherish my child… not as though he/she is a burden!  Take the time to point out the great facts about my kid regularly.  “Lisselle is so focused during art”  “Lisselle is really at her best during art class! Her work is really amazing.”  “She was so funny is school today, a real joy!” Before her diagnosis, and our subsequent decision to use medication for Lisselle there were many days she was a constant source of frustration for the teacher. Constant reminders of completing her work, stop twirling her hair, look at her paper, stop playing with the erasers…. The list goes on and on. But her teacher regularly listed Lisselle’s great strengths and features. It made me feel that although Lisselle was difficult at times, she was not a burden.
  • 14. What if I don’t talk to the parents regularly? I don’t always have time!  It takes 30 seconds to jot a note, or send a text, send me an email… anything.  Keep in touch about the good and the bad…  Listen to the concerns the parents have!  Take time… or try, try very hard!
  • 15. I have a big family, remember my one child in your class… not my only concern in life! If you can, remember to take two minutes to let me talk about ALL my kids… it can be hard. I have been blessed with amazing teachers who have time to discuss and talk with me. They work hard to build trust and care into our relationship. I would not be nearly so happy if I did not have them.
  • 16. I know it seems like a lot. But this is not an every day occurrence. So do not feel like we need to discuss everything every day. But I want to hear from the students on good, and bad days!  Some families need more time and commitment… try to figure them out.  Ask about preferred methods of communication  Ask about the other family members.  Ask how mom and dad are doing…  Ask, ask, ask, ask… that builds a foundation of caring, interest and trust.