Bicol Region…
National Capital Region…
Region V
Also known as Bicol Region or “Bikolandia”.
Located in the southernmost tip of Luzon
island.
This region compr...
National Capital Region
Commonly known as Metro Manila.
It is the seat of government and most populous
region of the Phi...
History…
D.Reyes…
Region V
The term Bicol could have been derived
from Bico, the name of a river which
drains in San Miguel Bay.
This regi...
1. Albay
A Spanish expedition led by Luis de Guzman
set foot in Albay in 1569.
-Masbate, Ticao, Burias and the Southern
B...
In 1846, Governor-General Narciso Claveria
decreed the seperation of the islands of Masbate,
Ticao, and Burias.
Albay wa...
2. Camarines Norte
Camarines derives its name from the Spanish
word camarin, meaning rice granary or
warehouse.
From 157...
3. Camarines Sur
Known centuries ago as the Tierra de
Camarines, the province is distinctly Spanish-
founded settlement.
...
4. Catanduanes
Isla de Cobos was Catanduanes’ first name given
by Spanish conquistadores when came upon
several tribes li...
Catanduanes was former sub-province of
Ambos Camarines in the early 1900s and later of
Albay.
It gained provincial auton...
5. Masbate
When Captain Luis Enriquez de Guzman
anchored on the shores of Masbate in 1569, he
found tiny settlements spre...
The Americans organized Masbate as a province
in 1901, but made it sub-province of Sorsogon
ion 1905.
Finally, on Decemb...
6. Sorsogon
Sorsogon came from the word Solsogon which
means “tracing the river by going upstream.”
Sorsogon was discove...
National Capital Region
The area of Metropolitan Manila was already
settled before the Spanish came.
After the Spaniards s...
In 1975, Metropolitan Manila Commission was
created to administer the emerging metropolis
when president Ferdinand Marcos ...
1. Caloocan City
The word caloocan comes from the Tagalog root
word lo-ok bay atttributed to its nearness to
Manila Bay.
D...
2. Las Piñas
The story about the true origin of the city’s
name, Las Piñas, varies:
- Piña
- Las Peñas(the rocks)
- In the...
In 1901, the municipality of Las Piñas was
separated from Cavite and incorporated to the
newly created province of Rizal.
...
On February 12, 1997, President Fidel V. Ramos
signed the bill which elevated Las Piñas from
municipality to city.
3. Malabon
In legend, Malabon comes from the word
maraming labong which means “plenty of
labong”, the edible of bamboo sho...
4. Mandaluyong
There are different stories on the origin of the
name “Mandaluyong”:
1. Mandaluyong got its name from the T...
It was part of the
Kingdom of Sapa and
then later called the
Kingdomof Namayan.
First known as a
barrio of Sta. ana de
Sap...
5. Makati
The name Makati came from the Tagalog word
“kati” which means tide that refers to the flow
of the Pasig River in...
However, in the passing of the Philippine Act
2390on February 28, 1914, san Pedro de Macati
was shortened to Makati name i...
6. Manila
Manila comes from the word maynilad.
The name is based on the nila, a flowering
mangrove plant that grew on the ...
7. Muntinlupa
The history of the name “Muntinlupa” comes
from at least three stories:
1. Its association with the thin top...
8. Marikina
Different
legends on
how the name
Marikina
came from.
From the priest
named
“Mariquina”
From a young
lady call...
The Augustinians were the first to arrive at the valley
in the 1570s, at the spot known as Chorillo in Barangka.
The Jesui...
9. Navotas City
According to one legend, the long and narrow delta
extended unbroken from north to south along the
seashor...
10. Quezon City
The name “Quezon City” came from the former
President Manuel L. Quezon who founded the city.
Before the Qu...
On October 12, 1939, Pres. Quezon signed the bill into
law, thus the city was born.
Seven years later, by the virtue of Re...
11. Parañaque City
How the Parañaque got its name?
“Para Aniya Ake”
“Palanyag”
Parañaque was founded in 1572 by the Augustinian
Missionaries from Spain.
During the Philippine Revolution, Parañaque beca...
12.Pasay City
There are several folk tales explaining where
Pasay City got its names:
1. A story about the two forbidden l...
In 1727, the Augustinians took over Pasay. Also, Pasay’s
name was changed to Pineda in honor of Don Cornelio
Pineda, a Spa...
Ignacio Santos Diaz, congressman from the first district
of Pasay, pushed for the conversion of the town into a
city and i...
13. Pasig City
The city’s name Pasig was believed to have come from
the old Sanskrit word “passid”, or sand.
The historian...
14. Taguig City
The original 800 farmer-fishermen settlers of the area
were good at threshing rice after harvest. Hence th...
Taguig was one of the earliest known territories to have
been Christianized when the Spaniards succeeded in
subjugating ma...
On November 7, 1975, Taguig was carved out
from the province of Rizal to form the
Metropolitan Manila. Today, Taguig is st...
15. San Juan City
"San Juan City" is a contraction of the city's
longer, ceremonial name of San Juan del Monte.
As with nu...
When the Spanish first took over the Kingdom
Namayan(where San Juan was a part of) which they re-
christened as Sta Ana de...
16. Valenzuela City
Valenzuela means “little valencia” in Spanish.
It was named after Pio Valenzuela, a Filipino physician...
The municipality of Polo in Bulacan was
renamed after Dr. Valenzuela on 1963.
By 8 November 1975, the municipality of
Vale...
17. Pateros
The name Pateros most likely derived form the
duck-raising industry.
The Tagalog word for “duck” is pato and
p...
~ It is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural
systems, and world views that relate humanity to
an order of existenc...
In National Capital Region
 The large majority of the population of Metro Manila is
Roman Catholic which compromises 80% ...
National Capital Region
Roman Catholic
Christians
Muslim
Others Religions
CHRISTIAN CHURCHES
IGLESIA NI CRISTO
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Manila
Sto. Niño de Tondo Parish
Pasig
Sta. Clara de Montefalco Parish
Manila
Quiapo Church
MUSLIM CHURCH
Quiapo, Manila
Golden Mosque
Other Church….
Quezon City
Manila Philippines Temple
Tondo, Manila
IEMELIF
In Bicol Region
 The whole region of Bicol retains Roman
Catholicism as the overwhelming religion of the
great majority. ...
Albay
Daraga Church
Naga City
Cathedral Of Naga
Metro Manila
Metro Manila is governed by a mayor and a
vice mayor elected to three-year terms.
The mayor is the executive ...
Among all cities in Metro Manila, only Manila,
Pasay and Caloocan implement the so-called
"Zone Systems".
A Zone is a grou...
City Seal Class Type District
No. of
Barangays
Mayor
1. Caloocan
City
Highly
Urbanized
City
3rd District 188
Mayor
Oscar
M...
5. Makati
City
Highly
Urbanized
City
4thDistrict 33
Mayor
Jejomar
Erwin S.
Binay
6. Manila
City
Highly
Urbanized
City
1st ...
10.
Parañaque
City
Highly
Urbanized
City
4th District 16
Mayor
Edwin
Olivarez
11. Pasay
City
Highly
Urbanized
City
4th Dis...
15.
Navotas
City
Highly
Urbanized
City
3rd District 14
Mayor
John
Reynald
Tiangco
16. San
Juan City
Highly
Urbanized
City
...
Bicol Region
Each province is governed by two main elected
branches of the government: executive and legislative.
The prov...
Provinc
e
Seal Capital
Class
Type
No. of
municip
alities
No. of
Cities
No. of
Barang
ays
Govern
or
1.
Albay
Legazpi 1st cl...
Province Seal Capital
Class
Type
No. of
municip
alities
No. of
Cities
No. of
Baranga
ys
Governo
r
4.
Catandu
anes
Virac 3r...
NCR(National Capital Region)
 NCR is considered as the political, economic, social, and
cultural center of the Philippine...
• Metro Manila is notorious for its traffic jams with
trips averaging at speeds as low as 6–8 kilometers
per hour. A trip ...
BICOL Region
 More than 50% of the region’s land is used for agriculture;
30% are forestland and the rest are for residen...
•To suit the tropical climate, the Bicolanos use light material for their
houses; others now have bungalows to withstand t...
•Close family ties and religiosity are important traits
for survival in the typhoon-prone physical
environment.
•Albay is ...
BICOL Region
Bicol Region has a large amount of rich flat land,
and agriculture is the largest component of the economy
wi...
Agriculture
Mining
Fishing Industry
National Capital Region (NCR) and Bicol Region
National Capital Region (NCR) and Bicol Region
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National Capital Region (NCR) and Bicol Region

The etymology of some cities found in NCR.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National Capital Region (NCR) and Bicol Region

  • 1. Bicol Region…
  • 2. National Capital Region…
  • 3. Region V Also known as Bicol Region or “Bikolandia”. Located in the southernmost tip of Luzon island. This region comprises 3 provinces of the Bikol Peninsula (Albay, Camarines Norte, and Camarines Sur), one Southern end of Luzon Island (Sorsogon) and two island provinces adjacent to the Peninsula (Catanduanes and Masbate).
  • 4. National Capital Region Commonly known as Metro Manila. It is the seat of government and most populous region of the Philippines. NCR is composes of cities of Caloocan, Las Pinas, Makati, Malabon, Mandaluyong, Manila, Marikina, Muntinlupa, Navotas, Paranaque, Pasay, Pasig, Quezon City, San Juan, Taguig and Valenzuela, as well as the Muncipality of Pateros.g
  • 5. History… D.Reyes…
  • 6. Region V The term Bicol could have been derived from Bico, the name of a river which drains in San Miguel Bay. This region was also known as Ibalon, variously interpreted to derived form Ibalio, “to bring to the other side”; ibalon, “people from the other side” or “people who are hospitable and give visitors gifts to bring home”.
  • 7. 1. Albay A Spanish expedition led by Luis de Guzman set foot in Albay in 1569. -Masbate, Ticao, Burias and the Southern Bicol Peninsula. In July 1573, Juan de Salcedo led 120 soldiers and Agustinian missionaries in another expedition from the north, entering the Bicol River from San Miguel Bay to Lake Bato.
  • 8. In 1846, Governor-General Narciso Claveria decreed the seperation of the islands of Masbate, Ticao, and Burias. Albay was created as a province under ct 2711 on March 10, 1917.
  • 9. 2. Camarines Norte Camarines derives its name from the Spanish word camarin, meaning rice granary or warehouse. From 1573 to 1829, Camarines Norte and Camarines Sur formed only one political unit known as Ambos Camarines. In 1829, they were seperated but reunited again in 1854. By virtue of RA Act 2809 of March 3, 1919, General F. B. Harrison seperated Camarines Norte from Camarines Sur with Don Miguel R. Lukban as its first governor.
  • 10. 3. Camarines Sur Known centuries ago as the Tierra de Camarines, the province is distinctly Spanish- founded settlement. In 1574, Governor General Guido de Lavezares referred Camarines Sur to the king of Spain as Los Camarines, after the abundance of canarins- rice granaries which were conspicuous features of the area.
  • 11. 4. Catanduanes Isla de Cobos was Catanduanes’ first name given by Spanish conquistadores when came upon several tribes living in the thatched huts called cobos during the earl part of 1573. Formerly known as Catanduan, Catandugan, and finally, Catanduanes, derived its name from the tando trees which then abound in the island. Juan de Salcedo arrived in the island in 1573, hunting for pirates, and conquered the natives.
  • 12. Catanduanes was former sub-province of Ambos Camarines in the early 1900s and later of Albay. It gained provincial autonomy when Congressman Francisco Perfecto filled House Bill No. 301 which separated the province from Albay and approved on September 26, 1945.
  • 13. 5. Masbate When Captain Luis Enriquez de Guzman anchored on the shores of Masbate in 1569, he found tiny settlements spread along the coasts engaged in the flourishing trade with China. Historical accounts show that the Christianization of Bicol Region actually began in Masbate in 1569. Masbate was originally part of Albay but it was separated from Albay in 1864.
  • 14. The Americans organized Masbate as a province in 1901, but made it sub-province of Sorsogon ion 1905. Finally, on December 15, 1920 the Philippine Legislature, through Act No. 2394, made Masbate an independent province.
  • 15. 6. Sorsogon Sorsogon came from the word Solsogon which means “tracing the river by going upstream.” Sorsogon was discovered 1569 by a group of Spanish missionaries named Father Alonzo Jimenez, Juan Orta, and Captain Luis Entiquez de Guzman Sorsogon became an independent region on October 17, 1894 with Juan de la Guardia as the first Governor.
  • 16. National Capital Region The area of Metropolitan Manila was already settled before the Spanish came. After the Spaniards successfully wrested power away from Lakan Dula, Rajah Matanda and Tariq Suleiman, even the attempt of the Chinese Pirate Warlord Limahong, they renamed the area and its surrounding as Nuevo Reino de Castilla. The government created the Province of Manila, composed of the Province of Tondo to the South and the isolated territories of Nueva Ecija to the north.
  • 17. In 1975, Metropolitan Manila Commission was created to administer the emerging metropolis when president Ferdinand Marcos issued Presidential Decree No. 824. Marcos appointed his wife Imelda Marcos as governor of Metro Manila. In 1986, a major government reorganization, President Corazon Aquino issued Executive Order No. 394 and changed the structure of the Metropolitan Manila Commission and renamed it to the Metropolitan Manila Authority.
  • 18. 1. Caloocan City The word caloocan comes from the Tagalog root word lo-ok bay atttributed to its nearness to Manila Bay. During the Spanish era, Caloocan used to be a small barrio named Aromahan or Libis Espina. During the formation of Rizal province, Caloocan was included in the matrix until 1975. This city is historically significant because it was center of activities for the Katipunan.
  • 19. 2. Las Piñas The story about the true origin of the city’s name, Las Piñas, varies: - Piña - Las Peñas(the rocks) - In the inscription of the church bell that states “Siendo cure del pueblo de Las Peñas el M.R.P. Padre Diego Cera se fundio este equilon ano de 1820” It was proclaimed a town of Cavite province either in 1762 or 1797.
  • 20. In 1901, the municipality of Las Piñas was separated from Cavite and incorporated to the newly created province of Rizal. Two years later, it was combined with the Parañaque with the latter as the seat of the new municipal government but it was separated from Parañaque to become municipality again on March 27, 1907. Then, with the founding of Metropolitan Manila Area in 1976, Las Piñas becane one of the municipalites making up the region.
  • 21. On February 12, 1997, President Fidel V. Ramos signed the bill which elevated Las Piñas from municipality to city.
  • 22. 3. Malabon In legend, Malabon comes from the word maraming labong which means “plenty of labong”, the edible of bamboo shoots. Malabon was founded as “Visita” of Tondo by the Agustinian friars on May 21, 1599.
  • 23. 4. Mandaluyong There are different stories on the origin of the name “Mandaluyong”: 1. Mandaluyong got its name from the Tagalog mga which means many and daluy which means flowing; 2. From the word daluyong which means “big waves from the sea”; 3. One of tells how the place was abundant with a kind of tree called luyong; 4. From the legend of Maharlika named Luyong who fell in love with Manda, the lovely daughter of barangay chieftain.
  • 24. It was part of the Kingdom of Sapa and then later called the Kingdomof Namayan. First known as a barrio of Sta. ana de Sapa which was part of Paco, province of Tondo. Named San Felipe Neri by the Spaniards in honour of the Patron Saint of Rome. In American Occupation, it was consolidated with the municipality of San Juan del Monte. In 1907, it was became an independent municipality when it was partitioned from San Juan. Renamed the Municipality of Mandaluyong by virtue of House Bill no. 3886.
  • 25. 5. Makati The name Makati came from the Tagalog word “kati” which means tide that refers to the flow of the Pasig River in the northern border of the city. Makati was under the district of Santa Ana de Sapa in between 1578-1670. And during the Spanish Era, the place was also known as San Pedro de Macati in honor of their patron saint. In 1901, the place was became a part of Rizal province.
  • 26. However, in the passing of the Philippine Act 2390on February 28, 1914, san Pedro de Macati was shortened to Makati name instead. On January 2, 1995, Makati became an independent ciity. In 1851, Don Jose Bonifacio purchased the Jesuit estate of “Hacienda San Pedro de Macati “ for 52,800 pesos. Then in 1930, the first airport, Nielsen Airport was built in what was now the Ayala Triangle in Makati.
  • 27. 6. Manila Manila comes from the word maynilad. The name is based on the nila, a flowering mangrove plant that grew on the marshy shores of the bay. It is ether from the phrase may nila, Tagalog for “there is nila.”
  • 28. 7. Muntinlupa The history of the name “Muntinlupa” comes from at least three stories: 1. Its association with the thin topsoil of area. 2. Residents, purportedly replying to a question by Spaniards in the 16th century what the name of their place was, said "Monte sa Lupa” apparently mistaking the question for what card game they were playing. 3. The topographical nature of the area, where the term Monte or mountain was expanded to Muntinlupa or mountain land. Muntinlupa is an old term that refers to a barangay hence called as Munting Lupa now known as Poblacion.
  • 29. 8. Marikina Different legends on how the name Marikina came from. From the priest named “Mariquina” From a young lady called “Maria Cuina” From the word “Marikit-na” From a town in Spain
  • 30. The Augustinians were the first to arrive at the valley in the 1570s, at the spot known as Chorillo in Barangka. The Jesuits was next to arrived in a place called Jesus Dela Peña on April 16, 1630. The area was later called Mariquina and was declared a pueblo under the Spanish colonial government. After the Americans took possessions of the Philippines, its name officially became Marikina. In 1856, as a town of shoemakers and shoe industry, Marikina named as the “Shoe Capital of the Philippines.” Marikina officially became part of the Metropolitan Manila on November 7, 1975.
  • 31. 9. Navotas City According to one legend, the long and narrow delta extended unbroken from north to south along the seashore. The strip of land between the former district of Tondo, Manila and this town was eaten away by the sea until an opening was made. Water began to flow through the opening. The geographical change prompted the people to refer to the place as "butas", "nayon ng butas",or "nabutas",a Tagalog word that means breached or pierced through. Other accounts said indicate Navotas was named after its patron saint, San Jose de Navotas.
  • 32. 10. Quezon City The name “Quezon City” came from the former President Manuel L. Quezon who founded the city. Before the Quezon City was created, it was composed of small individual towns of San Francisco del Monte, Novaliches, and Balintawak. Pres. Manuel L. Quezon dreamt a city that would become the future capital of the country to replace Manila. He envisioned a place where the common man will find his place with dignity. In 1939, President Quezon created the People’s Homesite Corporation and purchased 1,529 hectares from the vast Diliman estate of the Tuazon family.
  • 33. On October 12, 1939, Pres. Quezon signed the bill into law, thus the city was born. Seven years later, by the virtue of Republic Act. No. 333 signed on July 17, 1948, Quezon City became the capital of the Philippines signed by Pres. Quirino. On the same date, it also specify the boundaries between the Caloocan and Quezon City and the city’s area to be 156.60 sq.km. And lastly, on June 24, 1576, It lost its title as the National Capital of the Philippines to Manila by the virtue of Presidential Decree No. 940.
  • 34. 11. Parañaque City How the Parañaque got its name? “Para Aniya Ake” “Palanyag”
  • 35. Parañaque was founded in 1572 by the Augustinian Missionaries from Spain. During the Philippine Revolution, Parañaque became one of the hottest battle zones due to its location halfway between the province of Cavite and Manila. During the American Occupation, Parañaque became one of the first municipalities in the Metro Manila region. It was converted into a chartered city on February 15, 1998.
  • 36. 12.Pasay City There are several folk tales explaining where Pasay City got its names: 1. A story about the two forbidden lovers. 2. It is also said that the Pasay was then thick with pasaw, a plant with an exotic aroma. 3. Most people believed that it came from Dayang-Dayang Pasay, a princess from the Kingdom of Namayan, a cluster of barangays.
  • 37. In 1727, the Augustinians took over Pasay. Also, Pasay’s name was changed to Pineda in honor of Don Cornelio Pineda, a Spanish horticulturist. In 1862, a number of prominent citizens of Pasay sent a petition to the civil and ecclesiastical authorities asking that they allowed to manage their own political and religion affairs. On December 2, 1863, upon the recommendation of Archbishop Gregorio Martinez of Sta. Cruz, Pasay became a pueblo. On June 11, 1901, Pasay was incorporated to the Rizal province.
  • 38. Ignacio Santos Diaz, congressman from the first district of Pasay, pushed for the conversion of the town into a city and it to be named after Rizal. The Diaz Bill was signed into a law by President Roxas on June 21, 1947. Pasay Congressman Eulogio Rodriguez, Jr. filed a bill returning the city to its original name. On May 3, 1950, President Elpidio Quirino, once a resident of Pasay, signed into the law the bill approved by Congress.
  • 39. 13. Pasig City The city’s name Pasig was believed to have come from the old Sanskrit word “passid”, or sand. The historian and educator Alejandro Roces believed that El Pasig came from Legazpi(Miguel Lopez de Legazpi). Historians traced the town’s name to the word “mabagsik” meaning violent in action or force with aptly describes the river. Another belief was that it was derived from “dalampasigan” which means “baybay ng ilog”, river’s edge or bank in English. Dr. Jose Villa Panganiban said that “Pasig” is came from an old Sanskrit word “passis” referring to a “river flowing from one body of water to another.”
  • 40. 14. Taguig City The original 800 farmer-fishermen settlers of the area were good at threshing rice after harvest. Hence they were referred to as "mga taga-giik," and the settlement as "pook ng mga taga-giik." Spanish friar Fray Alonso de Alvarado, together with conquistador Rey Lopez de Villalobos who crossed Pasig River to reach Taguig in 1571 found "taga-giik" difficult to pronounce. "Tagui-ig" was later shortened to its current form "Taguig."
  • 41. Taguig was one of the earliest known territories to have been Christianized when the Spaniards succeeded in subjugating mainland Luzon through Legazpi expedition in 1571. It was in1587 when Taguig was established as a separate pueblo of the province of Manila. After the start of American regime, Taguig was proclaimed as an independent municipality with the promulgation of General Order No. 4 on March 9, 1900. On October 12, 1903, Taguig, Muntinlupa, and Pateros were merged by the virtue of Act No. 942 with Pateros hosting the seat of the municipal government.
  • 42. On November 7, 1975, Taguig was carved out from the province of Rizal to form the Metropolitan Manila. Today, Taguig is still one of the seventeen cities and municipalities that comprise Metro Manila. In 1908, a bill was passed in Congress pushing for the cityhood of Taguig. The resulting plebiscite showed that the citizens were against cityhood. Subsequently, Taguig became a city on December 8, 2004.
  • 43. 15. San Juan City "San Juan City" is a contraction of the city's longer, ceremonial name of San Juan del Monte. As with numerous other places in the Philippines, the city's name combines a patron saint and a toponym; --in this case, the place is named for Saint John de Baptist and its hilly, relatively high elevation compared to surrounding areas.
  • 44. When the Spanish first took over the Kingdom Namayan(where San Juan was a part of) which they re- christened as Sta Ana de Sapa, the village remained a part of it, re classified as a barrio and became a small encomienda by 1590. In 1783, San Juan became independent of Santa ana but it was still then a barrio. Although not officially designated as such, the city of San Juan could also called the “The Town of Philippines Presidents.” On June 16, 2007, voters in San Juan ratified the conversion of the municipality into a highly urbanized city, pursuant to Republic Act No. 9388.
  • 45. 16. Valenzuela City Valenzuela means “little valencia” in Spanish. It was named after Pio Valenzuela, a Filipino physician who was among the leaders of the Katipunan and served as the town’s presidente municipal who was appointed to serve as such. The historic City of Valenzuela was originally known as Polo under the administration of the province of Bulacan then Meycauayan and the year of 1623, it was became municipality independent from Meycauayan. The Philippines was then ruled by the military of Americans, Dr. Pio Alejandrino Valenzuela was appointed mayor of the municipality of Polo on September 6, 1999.
  • 46. The municipality of Polo in Bulacan was renamed after Dr. Valenzuela on 1963. By 8 November 1975, the municipality of Valenzuela was no longer part of Bulacan. Valenzuela officially achieved its cityhood on 14 February 1998 under the presidency of Fidel V. Ramos.
  • 47. 17. Pateros The name Pateros most likely derived form the duck-raising industry. The Tagalog word for “duck” is pato and pateros means “duck-raisers.” Edmund Roberts used duck-town a the alternate name for Pateros. Stating that he “never before saw somany duck together,” in one place.
  • 48. ~ It is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural systems, and world views that relate humanity to an order of existence. Religion
  • 49. In National Capital Region  The large majority of the population of Metro Manila is Roman Catholic which compromises 80% of the region's population. Other religions represented are Hindus, Buddhists, Protestants, Evangelicals, Islam, Members Church of God International, and Iglesia Ni Cristo. Other denominations such as Jesus Is Lord, Pentecostal Missionary Church of Christ, Jesus Miracle Crusade and others also compose the region's population.
  • 50. National Capital Region Roman Catholic Christians Muslim Others Religions
  • 51. CHRISTIAN CHURCHES
  • 52. IGLESIA NI CRISTO
  • 53. CATHOLIC CHURCH
  • 54. Manila Sto. Niño de Tondo Parish
  • 55. Pasig Sta. Clara de Montefalco Parish
  • 56. Manila Quiapo Church
  • 57. MUSLIM CHURCH
  • 58. Quiapo, Manila Golden Mosque
  • 59. Other Church….
  • 60. Quezon City Manila Philippines Temple
  • 61. Tondo, Manila IEMELIF
  • 62. In Bicol Region  The whole region of Bicol retains Roman Catholicism as the overwhelming religion of the great majority. The Catholic religion has the highest number of followers than any other area in the Philippines.
  • 63. Albay Daraga Church
  • 64. Naga City Cathedral Of Naga
  • 65. Metro Manila Metro Manila is governed by a mayor and a vice mayor elected to three-year terms. The mayor is the executive head and leads the city's departments in executing the city ordinances and improving public services along with city councilors while the vice mayor heads a legislative council along with barangay councilors. Every barangay also has its own set of projects, providing community service in the city as well as basic services provided for remote residences.
  • 66. Among all cities in Metro Manila, only Manila, Pasay and Caloocan implement the so-called "Zone Systems". A Zone is a group of barangays in a district.
  • 67. City Seal Class Type District No. of Barangays Mayor 1. Caloocan City Highly Urbanized City 3rd District 188 Mayor Oscar Malapitan 2.Las Piñas Highly Urbanized City 4th District 20 Mayor Imelda Aguilar 3. Malabon Highly Urbanized City 3rd District 21 Mayor Antolin A. Oreta III 4. Mandaluyo ng City Highly Urbanized City 2nd District 27 Mayor Benjamin D.C. Abalos
  • 68. 5. Makati City Highly Urbanized City 4thDistrict 33 Mayor Jejomar Erwin S. Binay 6. Manila City Highly Urbanized City 1st District 897 Mayor Joseph Estrada 7. Marikina City Highly Urbanized City 2nd District 16 Mayor Del de Guzman 8. Muntinlupa City Highly Urbanized City 4th District 9 Mayor Jaime Fresnedi 9. Quezon City Highly Urbanized City 2nd District 310 Mayor Herbert Bautista
  • 69. 10. Parañaque City Highly Urbanized City 4th District 16 Mayor Edwin Olivarez 11. Pasay City Highly Urbanized City 4th District 201 Mayor Antonino Calixto 12. Pasig City Highly Urbanized City 2nd District 30 Mayor Maribel Eusebio 13. Taguig City Highly Urbanized City 4th District 28 Mayor Maria Laarni Cayetano 14. Valenzuela City Highly Urbanized City 3rd District 33 Mayor Reylon Gatchalian
  • 70. 15. Navotas City Highly Urbanized City 3rd District 14 Mayor John Reynald Tiangco 16. San Juan City Highly Urbanized City 2nd District 21 Mayor Guia Gomez 17. Pateros 4th District 10 Mayor Jaime Cruz
  • 71. Bicol Region Each province is governed by two main elected branches of the government: executive and legislative. The provincial governor is chief executive and head of each province. -Elected to a term of three years and limited to three consecutive terms, he or she appoints the directors of each provincial department which include the office of administration, engineering office, information office, legal office, and treasury office.
  • 72. Provinc e Seal Capital Class Type No. of municip alities No. of Cities No. of Barang ays Govern or 1. Albay Legazpi 1st class 15 3 720 Gov. Joey Salceda 2. Camari nes Norte Daet 2nd Class 12 282 Gov. Edgard o TAllado 3. Camari nes Sur Pili 1st Class 35 2 1063 Gov. Miguel Villafue rte
  • 73. Province Seal Capital Class Type No. of municip alities No. of Cities No. of Baranga ys Governo r 4. Catandu anes Virac 3rd Class 11 315 Gov. Araceli Wong 5. Masbate Masbate City 1st Class 20 1 550 Rizalina Seachon- Lañete 6. Sorsogon Sorsogon City 2nd Class 14 1 541 Antonio Escadeo
  • 74. NCR(National Capital Region)  NCR is considered as the political, economic, social, and cultural center of the Philippines and is one of the more modern metropolises in Southeast Asia.  Metro Manila is the shopping center of the Philippines.  Metro Manila is a place of economic extremes. Many high-income citizens live in exclusive communities such as Forbes Park in Makati and Ayala Alabang in Muntinlupa. In contrast to these residences are the slums and illegal settlement scattered across the metropolitan area and are often found in vacant government land or in districts such as Tondo. .
  • 75. • Metro Manila is notorious for its traffic jams with trips averaging at speeds as low as 6–8 kilometers per hour. A trip that should take 20 minutes will last an hour or more especially during rush hour. Consequently, the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority has constructed many projects to decongest traffic. • For a long time since its founding in 1925, the Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company (PLDT) was the Philippines' only phone carrier.
  • 76. BICOL Region  More than 50% of the region’s land is used for agriculture; 30% are forestland and the rest are for residential, commercial and industrial purposes. Major sources of income in the region are farming, forestry products, mining, rice and corn milling and fishing. The major crops of the Bicol Region are coconut, palay, cassava, corn, abaca and coconut. The region has significant deposits of gold, silver, lead, zinc, iron, nickel, chromite, copper and manganese.  Mining is also one of the contributors to the region's economy. Several handicrafts, jewelry manufacturing, other small-scale industries and manufacturing enterprises bolster rural incomes.
  • 77. •To suit the tropical climate, the Bicolanos use light material for their houses; others now have bungalows to withstand the impact of strong typhoons. Light, western styled clothes are predominantly used now. •To suit the tropical climate, the Bicolanos use light material for their houses; others now have bungalows to withstand the impact of strong typhoons. Light, western styled clothes are predominantly used now. •Meals are generally rich in carbohydrates and viands of vegetables, fish and meat are cooked in various ways. Bicolanos almost always cook their vegetables in coconut milk; for meat recipes such as pochero, adobo and tapa. A special meat dish is the dinuguan. Fish that serve as common viand are mackerel and anchovy; in Lake Buhi, the sinarapan or tabios (known as the smallest fish in the world) is common. Except for those living in Rinconada, Bicolanos are not extraordinarily fond of eating hot or peppery.
  • 78. •Close family ties and religiosity are important traits for survival in the typhoon-prone physical environment. •Albay is a major supplier of geothermal energy to the Luzon Grid with its Tiwi Geothermal Plant in Tiwi.
  • 79. BICOL Region Bicol Region has a large amount of rich flat land, and agriculture is the largest component of the economy with close to 50% depending their livelihood on the industry. Coconuts,abaca, banana, coffee, and jackfruit are the top five permanent crops in the region. Rice and maize are among the chief seasonal crops of the region. Commercial fishing is also important with thirteen major fishing grounds supplying fish markets in places as far as Metro Manila. Agriculture and fishing are the major factors in the province's economy. Mining is also one of the contributors to the region's economy.
  • 80. Agriculture
  • 81. Mining
  • 82. Fishing Industry