Population Change Key Terms <ul><li>In 2003 the world population is over 6.3 billion! </li></ul><ul><li>A population may i...
Which continents are growing fastest? Percentage bar graphs of population per continent in 1950, 1995 and 2025 (estimate) ...
Birth Rate Death Rate <ul><li>Improved transport to move food, doctors, etc </li></ul><ul><li>A decrease in child mortalit...
<ul><li>No birth control or family planning </li></ul>Birth Rate Death Rate <ul><li>So many children die in infancy that p...
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Pop Change

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pop Change

  • 1. Population Change Key Terms <ul><li>In 2003 the world population is over 6.3 billion! </li></ul><ul><li>A population may increase or decrease over time. </li></ul><ul><li>Population change depends on the birth rate, the death rate and migration. </li></ul><ul><li>A population grows if the birth rate is higher than the death rate, i.e. there is a natural increase. </li></ul>Birth Rate The number of live births per 1000 population per year. Death Rate The number of deaths per 1000 population per year. Natural Increase The birth rate minus the death rate. Migration The movement of people either into or out of an area. Annual Population Growth The birth rate minus the death rate + or – migration.
  • 2. Which continents are growing fastest? Percentage bar graphs of population per continent in 1950, 1995 and 2025 (estimate) Populations of LEDC’s are growing faster than MEDC’s.
  • 3. Birth Rate Death Rate <ul><li>Improved transport to move food, doctors, etc </li></ul><ul><li>A decrease in child mortality </li></ul><ul><li>A lower infant mortality rate therefore less need to have so many children. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased industrialisation and mechanisation meaning fewer labourers are needed. </li></ul><ul><li>Family planning – contraceptives, sterilisation, abortion and government incentives. </li></ul><ul><li>Improved sanitation and water supply. </li></ul><ul><li>Improvements in food production (both quality and quantity). </li></ul><ul><li>More freedom for women, enabling them to follow their own careers rather than being solely child bearers. </li></ul><ul><li>Improved medical care – vaccinations, hospitals, doctors, new drugs and scientific inventions. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased desire for material possessions (cars, holidays, bigger homes) and less for large families. </li></ul>MEDC's
  • 4. <ul><li>No birth control or family planning </li></ul>Birth Rate Death Rate <ul><li>So many children die in infancy that parents tend to produce more in the hope that several will live. </li></ul><ul><li>Disease and plague (bubonic, cholera, kwashiorkor) </li></ul><ul><li>Famine, uncertain food supplies, poor diet. </li></ul><ul><li>Religious beliefs (e.g. Roman Catholics, Moslems and Hindus) encourage large families. </li></ul><ul><li>Poor hygiene – no piped, clean water and no sewage disposal. </li></ul><ul><li>Little medical science – few doctors, hospital, drugs. </li></ul><ul><li>Many children are needed to work on the land. </li></ul><ul><li>Children are regarded as a sign of virility. </li></ul>LEDC's

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