Integrating Study Abroad Into Your Students’ Academic Plans<br />The Vital Role <br />Academic Advisers Can <br />– and Sh...
Today’s Session<br /><ul><li>Background,Data and Student Participation
Myths and Misperceptions
Challenges to and Strategies for Getting Students Abroad
Types of Study Abroad Programs – What’s the Difference?
Funding Sources – More than You May Think
The Senator Paul Simon Act
The Role that Academic Advisers Can Play
Spreading the Word to Students
Working with Faculty
Information Resources
Discussion </li></li></ul><li>Study Abroad Student Participation <br />1985 - Present<br />Information from Open Doors Rep...
Study Abroad Student Participation <br />2006-2007<br /><ul><li>Numbers
241,791 U.S. students studied abroad – +8% increase from 05-06
2% of U.S. collegiate student population – still
Duration
55% short-term programs – 8 weeks or less
40% mid-term programs – semester/quarter
4% long term programs – year abroad
By Class Standing (UG)
36%: Junior; 21% Senior; 13% Sophomore
Majority
Caucasian (82%), Female (65%)</li></ul>Information from Open Doors Report 2008, Institute of International Education<br />...
Most Popular Destinations<br />
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Integrating Study Abroad Into Your Students\' Academic Plans: The Vital Roles Academic Advisers Play

This presentation shows what a vital role that university and collegiate academic advisers play in the study abroad process, including an overview of study abroad from a U.S. perspective, numbers, growth, key majors, the Simon Bill in front of Congress, how to work with faculty to support and promote study abroad, and how academic advisers can get more of their students and advisees to consider an international experience.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Integrating Study Abroad Into Your Students\' Academic Plans: The Vital Roles Academic Advisers Play

  • 1. Integrating Study Abroad Into Your Students’ Academic Plans<br />The Vital Role <br />Academic Advisers Can <br />– and Should – Play<br />Steve Luther<br />Manager of Faculty and Academic Outreach<br />AustraLearn – AsiaLearn – EuroLearn<br />Educational Programs of GlobaLinks<br />Westminster, Colorado<br />
  • 2. Today’s Session<br /><ul><li>Background,Data and Student Participation
  • 3. Myths and Misperceptions
  • 4. Challenges to and Strategies for Getting Students Abroad
  • 5. Types of Study Abroad Programs – What’s the Difference?
  • 6. Funding Sources – More than You May Think
  • 7. The Senator Paul Simon Act
  • 8. The Role that Academic Advisers Can Play
  • 9. Spreading the Word to Students
  • 10. Working with Faculty
  • 11. Information Resources
  • 12. Discussion </li></li></ul><li>Study Abroad Student Participation <br />1985 - Present<br />Information from Open Doors Report 2008, Institute of International Education<br />http://www.opendoors.iienetwork.org/<br />
  • 13. Study Abroad Student Participation <br />2006-2007<br /><ul><li>Numbers
  • 14. 241,791 U.S. students studied abroad – +8% increase from 05-06
  • 15. 2% of U.S. collegiate student population – still
  • 16. Duration
  • 17. 55% short-term programs – 8 weeks or less
  • 18. 40% mid-term programs – semester/quarter
  • 19. 4% long term programs – year abroad
  • 20. By Class Standing (UG)
  • 21. 36%: Junior; 21% Senior; 13% Sophomore
  • 22. Majority
  • 23. Caucasian (82%), Female (65%)</li></ul>Information from Open Doors Report 2008, Institute of International Education<br />http://www.opendoors.iienetwork.org/<br />
  • 24. Most Popular Destinations<br />
  • 25. Study Abroad Student Participation <br />2006-2007 By Major<br /><ul><li>21%: Social Science Majors (51,600; +6.5% vs. 2005-2006)
  • 26. 19%: Business/Management (46,000; +17%)
  • 27. 13%:Humanities (32,000; no change)
  • 28. 8%:Fine/Applied Arts (18,500; +10.5%)
  • 29. 7%: Physical/Life Sciences (17,600; +14.5%)
  • 30. 7%: Foreign Languages (17,300; -1.5%)
  • 31. 4%: Education (10,200; +12.5%)
  • 32. 3%:Engineering (7,400; +13%)
  • 33. 1.5%:Math/Computer Science (3,500; +8%)
  • 34. 1.5%:Agriculture (3,500; +25%)
  • 35. 3%: Undeclared (7,600; + 0.4%)
  • 36. 6.5% “ Other Fields” (16,400; +2.5%)</li></ul>Information from Open Doors Report 2008, Institute of International Education<br />http://www.opendoors.iienetwork.org/<br />
  • 37. Study Abroad Student Participation <br />2006-2007 – NACADARegion 10 <br />By State <br />Arizona (3,900 Abroad +4% vs. Prev. Year)<br />Colorado (3,800 Abroad; +18%)<br />Utah (2,800; +3%)<br />New Mexico (870 Abroad; -1%)<br />Wyoming (355 Abroad; +55%)<br />(CA 24,000 Abroad; NY 19,000; PA 15,000)<br />Total # Abroad Students Nationally, Doctoral Inst. <br />#15 U. Arizona (1,777)<br />#17 BYU (1,756)<br />#26 Ariz. State (1,487)<br />#36 CU-Boulder (1,159)<br />(1 NYU 3,034; 2 Mich St. (2,801); 3 UT-Austin (2,172)<br />By % of UG Participation Nationally, Doctoral Inst.<br />#2 U. Denver (74%)<br />Information from Open Doors Report 2008, Institute of International Education<br />http://www.opendoors.iienetwork.org/<br />
  • 38. Challenges of Study Abroad <br />at the University Level<br />Is International Education Included in Your Institution’s Mission Statement?<br /><ul><li>64%: Yes 36%: No</li></ul>Institution Actively Trying to Send More Abroad?<br /><ul><li>75%: Yes 25%: No</li></ul>Institution Set Targets For Increasing Participation?<br /><ul><li>63%: No 37%: Yes </li></ul>Biggest Challenges According to Study Abroad Advisers: <br /><ul><li>82%: Rising costs for students to participate
  • 39. 67%: Not enough home univ. scholarships, funding
  • 40. 61%: Not enough staff to handle more students
  • 41. 40%: Not enough interest from faculty to integrate study abroad into curriculum for credit transfer</li></ul>Information from The Forum on Education Abroad, State of the Field Survey 2008<br />http://www.forumea.org<br />
  • 42. Common Myths and Misunderstandings About Education Abroad from Students<br />Costs too much/no funding<br />There’s no financing options or scholarships<br />Will delay graduation<br />Need to speak a foreign language<br />No applicable programs for specific major – especially professional programs (Nursing, STEM fields, Education, Architecture, etc)<br />Credit won’t transfer to degree<br />Nobody to help me on campus<br />Unsupportive faculty – or are they? <br />Lack of opportunities for upper-division students or after undergraduate graduation<br />How will this experience help me – currently or after graduation? <br />
  • 43. Reality Check: Causes of Why More Students Aren’t Going Abroad<br />Can’t afford it – particularly in current economy <br />Don’t know about – or apply for – scholarships <br />Don’t find out in time – lack of campus outreach<br />Nobody ever told them why or the benefits <br />Disjointed campus process: runaround, bureaucracy<br />Don’t know what to do/how to access<br />Restrictive majors and/or academic departments <br />Some faculty may say: “Can’t get a better education anywhere but here”<br />Lack of institutional policies <br />Lack of a dedicated study abroad office or coordinator<br />Lack of support for students’ program<br />Financial/institutional aid portability <br />Public vs. private institutions – differing challenges <br />
  • 44. Explaining the Benefits <br />2nd best thing a student can do while in school<br />Open to all students – all majors<br />Studying abroad = more employable <br />Life-Changing – no matter how small<br />Millions of $$$ of scholarships available<br />Financial aid may very well be allowed to be used on these programs<br />Credit can transfer back (specific to univ., dept policies)<br />Meet students from around the world – future contacts – gateway to international travel and work possibilities<br />Once-in-lifetime experience – hard-pressed to duplicate for the rest of their lives<br />Strong U.S. dollar abroad (favorable exchange rates in many overseas countries)<br />
  • 45. Standard Student Study Abroad Process<br /><ul><li>Meet with campus study abroad office/coordinator
  • 46. Attend campus study abroad fair (if held)
  • 47. Meet with academic adviser or faculty adviser to plan the experience into their curriculum
  • 48. Talk to their parents/others in decision process
  • 49. Meet with financial aid office
  • 50. Apply and gain acceptance to study abroad program of choice
  • 51. Obtain required course approvals
  • 52. Apply for scholarships
  • 53. Attend pre-departure orientation
  • 54. Go abroad!
  • 55. Return home, share, sign up for alumni program</li></li></ul><li>Scholarships: Millions of $$$ Available<br />Home University Grants<br /><ul><li>Does your institution offer awards?
  • 56. Is there a study abroad fee as part of tuition? </li></ul>Program Scholarships<br /><ul><li>Most independent programs offer scholarships, hundreds to $1,000+ Awards
  • 57. Some Independent Sources:
  • 58. Gilman: $6 Million in Funding ($4-5,000 awards) + $3,000 “Critical” Language Grants
  • 59. Rotary: Award amounts up to $25,000
  • 60. Fulbright: Many Programs, Millions in Funding
  • 61. Boren/NSEP: Award amounts up to $20,000
  • 62. Freeman Asia: Awards amounts up $7,000
  • 63. Diversity Abroad.Com: 20 $1,000 Awards
  • 64. Foundation for Asia Pacific Education (Colo.)</li></li></ul><li>Federal Legislation: Senator Paul Simon Study Abroad Foundation Act<br />Goal: Increase U.S. student participation to one million students annually<br /><ul><li>Increase participation in “quality” study abroad programs
  • 65. Ensure diversity in student participation
  • 66. Diversity locations – particularly developing countries
  • 67. Make study abroad a cornerstone of higher education </li></ul>Funding<br /><ul><li>U.S. Govt to provide $80 million/year
  • 68. 25% direct to students; 75% direct to institutions (85% of that toward scholarships)
  • 69. Institutions apply to independent foundation for grants</li></ul>Information from NAFSA: Association of International Educators <br />www.nafsa.org/simon www.nafsa.org/takeaction<br />
  • 70. Types of Study Abroad Programs<br />Semester/Year: Exchange<br /><ul><li>1:1, often pay home uni tuition
  • 71. Limited, competitive, over-demand</li></ul>Semester/Year: Direct Agreement<br /><ul><li>Negotiated, usually lower overseas uni tuition
  • 72. Student often has to manage own logistics</li></ul>Semester/Year: Program Provider<br /><ul><li>Comprehensive servicing
  • 73. Takes the load off university, student</li></ul>Other Types<br /><ul><li>Internships…mostly for-credit, unpaid
  • 74. Short-term and/or faculty-led
  • 75. Volunteer or Service Learning
  • 76. Degree earned overseas (grad school)
  • 77. Peace Corps, Teach Abroad, etc etc etc </li></li></ul><li>Study Abroad “Program Providers”<br />
  • 78. What aProgram Provider Can Do<br />For students:<br /><ul><li>Offer multitude of program types, destinations
  • 79. Almost always offer scholarships
  • 80. Open access to all students
  • 81. Arrange enrollment, program counsel, course selection and academic planning, logistics (flights, airport pick-up), insurance and student visa, in-country group orientation, add-on trips/tours, resident directors, 24/7 support</li></ul>For universities: <br /><ul><li>Work with faculties, though most focus on recruitment
  • 82. Curriculum integration/matching
  • 83. Bulk purchase/currency hedging to keep pricing down
  • 84. Work with financial aid processes, arrange consortium agreements
  • 85. Arrange faculty-led programs and exchanges, overseas site visits for advisers, faculty</li></li></ul><li>What Role Can Academic Advisers Play?<br />Academic advisers can play a vital role in the study abroad process with their students by: <br />Promoting awareness<br />Advocating the benefits <br />Encouraging participation<br />Planning study abroad into students’ academic programs<br />Helping faculty members with curricular integration<br />Partnering with campus study abroad offices and specific study abroad programs <br />We’re all in this together, if we’re ever going to get more than 2% of the students abroad<br />
  • 86. Study Abroad as a Recruitment Tool <br />for Academic Departments<br />On Your Campus<br /><ul><li>Get to know your campus International Programs/Study Abroad office and staff
  • 87. They do want to reach out to academic departments, but often are time-challenged or only make contact during a “crisis”
  • 88. Is there an annual or bi-annual study abroad fair?
  • 89. Is faculty/academic adviser training offered in study abroad?
  • 90. Presentation/table at freshman orientation; homecoming; parents’ weekend; campus tour stop
  • 91. Professional resources via NACADA</li></ul>In Your Community<br /><ul><li>High school recruitment events
  • 92. College fair recruitment events</li></li></ul><li>Spreading the Word to Your Advisees<br /><ul><li>Student email list-serv announcements
  • 93. Links on your academic department website
  • 94. Class announcements or presentations
  • 95. Some provider organizations actively partner with academic departments for scheduled campus visits
  • 96. Bulletin boards, departmental libraries
  • 97. Students clubs and societies
  • 98. Utilize study abroad alumni in your department
  • 99. Recruitment tool for future majors
  • 100. Is your dept using social media? Facebook, Twitter, Digg, etc
  • 101. Support the campus study abroad/international programs office by spreading word of events, info sessions, etc
  • 102. Most would welcome the support/partnership</li></li></ul><li>What if Your Department Doesn’t Have Study Abroad Options? <br />Does your campus have a study abroad office/coordinator?<br /><ul><li>Can be a dedicated campus office or sometimes a faculty member</li></ul>Is there a faculty member in your department who is supportive/interested/curious?<br /><ul><li>Remember adjuncts, part-time lecturers</li></ul>Is there a campus process for study abroad?<br /><ul><li>Collaborative effort of multiple academic departments, financial aid office, registrar, other offices (career svcs)</li></ul>Resources for finding programs relevant to your students<br /><ul><li>Handout : NACADA study abroad resources
  • 103. Helpful websites: studyabroad.com, goabroad.com, iiepassport.org, studyabroaddirectory.com, studyabroadfunding.com, studyabroadlinks.com
  • 104. NAFSA secuss-L study abroad list-serv</li></li></ul><li>Ideas: Working with Faculty<br />Thoughts from an outside observer<br /><ul><li>Most faculty are at least casually interested in study abroad and some are tireless supporters
  • 105. Faculty can suffer from lack of information about overseas programs and options
  • 106. Curriculum matching (for overseas universities) key
  • 107. Ideal: faculty-driven process for course approval and credit transfer
  • 108. Most will usually allow at least a short announcement in their classes
  • 109. Short-term, faculty-led programs are a good entrée to whet the appetite
  • 110. The more rigorous the major, the less flexibility there is to integrate study abroad
  • 111. Sell the benefits (sometimes it’s good to bring in outside expertise to help)</li></li></ul><li>President Obama Said…<br />On “the importance of encouraging young people to be internationally engaged” according to President Barack Obama:<br />“I’d like to find new ways to connect young Americans to young people all around the world, by supporting opportunities to learn new languages, and serve and study, welcoming students from other countries to our shores. That’s always been a critical part of how America engages the world. That’s how my father, who was from Kenya, from Africa, came to the United States and eventually met my mother. <br />Simple exchanges can break down walls between us, for when people come together and speak to one another and share a common experience, then their common humanity is revealed. We are reminded that we’re joined together by our pursuit of a life that’s productive and purposeful, and when that happens mistrust begins to fade and our smaller differences no longer overshadow the things that we share. And that’s where progress begins.”<br />
  • 112. Questions/Discussion<br />Steve Luther<br />Manager of Faculty and Academic Outreach<br />AustraLearn – AsiaLearn – EuroLearn<br />Educational Programs of GlobaLinks<br />Westminster, Colorado<br />www.globalinksabroad.org <br />800-980-0033 / 303-446-2214<br />sluther@globalinksabroad.org<br />

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