Published by:
National Tobacco Control Coordinating Office
National Center for Health Promotion
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
2F Bld...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL
TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY..............................................................................................
 
NTCS 2011-2016 ANNEXES.....................................................................................................
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 1
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are defined as diseases of...
2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
Globally, tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and its effects...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 3
the most widely embraced treaty in the history of the United Nations that a...
4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
(3) strengthen the organizational capacity. The first strategy will largely be d...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 5
INTRODUCTION
CONCEPT AND RATIONALE
The World Health Organization (WHO) esti...
6 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
The Philippines, being an eligible Party in the WPR, is bound to meet the oblig...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 7
cardiovascular diseases. An estimated six million people die from tobacco u...
8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
TOBACCO CONTROL POLICIES
IN THE PHILIPPINES
Government Agencies Implementing To...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 9
The Government of the Philippines continues to coordinate and implement the...
10 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
The Universal Health Care (UHC), which is the health agenda of the present adm...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 11
TOBACCO CONTROL
ASSESSMENT FOR
THE NATIONAL CAPACITY
As a party to the WHO...
12 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
• Introduced effective mechanisms to monitor the influence of the tobacco indus...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 13
5. DEVELOP COORDINATION AND IMPLEMENTATION MECHANISMS
The National Tobacco...
14 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
6. Finalize and officially make a National Strategy and Plan of Action that wi...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 15
THE COUNTRY’S RESPONSE
CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016):
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL T...
16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
2. The MPOWER package. This is a set of six proven policies aimed at reversing...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 17
For the second goal, which is to attain the highest level of protection fr...
18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
FRAMEWORK
CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016)
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO
THE PHILIPP...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 19
VISION: Tobacco-Free Philippines: Healthier People, Communities, and Envir...
20 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
STRATEGY 2: MOBILIZE FOR PUBLIC ACTION
Strategies Key Actions Performance Indi...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 21
2.2.2 Allocate from tobacco taxes
revenues for health priorities,
social h...
22 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
STRATEGY 2: MOBILIZE FOR PUBLIC ACTION
This is to mobilize and empower policy-...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 23
attractiveness of tobacco products, reducing their addictiveness (or depen...
24 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
Given the scientific evidence supporting the use of graphic health information,...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 25
In addition, regular awareness campaigns displaying tobacco industry strat...
26 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
gap between higher and lower priced classes of cigarettes. Replacing the Phili...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 27
This strategy shall ensure that the percentage of revenues as agreed by De...
28 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
This strategy would create a proactive and working multi-disciplinary body tha...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 29
There are certain provisions included in the Tobacco Act that may be enfor...
30 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
Table 2: Strategies, Key Actions, and Performance Indicators under Strategy 3
...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 31
Strategies Key Actions Performance Indicators
3.1.4 Establish incentive me...
32 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
Strategies Key Actions Performance Indicators
3.4 Public awareness,
education,...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 33
STRATEGY 3.1: INVESTMENT PLANNING AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
3.1.1 Strengthen...
34 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
Performance Indicators:
• Template of Tobacco Control Annual Investment Plan f...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 35
module prepared by the DOH Health Human Resource Development Bureau (DOH-H...
36 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
• Provide an opportunity for exchange of information on the results of researc...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 37
dependent on external sources. This is relevant especially in the case of ...
38 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
According to the DOH Department Order (DO) No. 29 of February 7, 2011, NEC has...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 39
3.4.2 Ensure funding for implementation of communication and advocacy plan...
40 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
48
National Capacity Assessment, section V.2.4
professional societies could al...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 41
RA 9211 mandates PhilHealth to cover outpatient cessation counseling for m...
42 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
AdBoard Advertising Board of the Philippine...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 43
DOHN-CDPC Department of Health National Center for Disease Prevention and
...
44 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES
NTRC National Tax Research Center
NYC National Youth Commission
OSG Office of ...
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 45
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Behavioral support39
- refers to support, other than med...
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National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS)

National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS)
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      
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Transcripts - National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS)

  • 1. Published by: National Tobacco Control Coordinating Office National Center for Health Promotion DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 2F Bldg. 18, San Lazaro Compound Sta. Cruz, Manila 1003 Philippines Telefax: (632) 711-9648 Printed in July 2012
  • 2. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016)
  • 3.
  • 4.               EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.............................................................................................................. 1 I. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................5 A.  CONCEPT AND RATIONALE ................................................................................... 5  B.  PREVALENCE OF TOBACCO USE IN THE PHILIPPINES ............................................................................................................ 6  C.  HEALTH EFFECTS OF TOBACCO USE: MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY OF TOBACCO-RELATED DISEASES ...................................... 6  II. TOBACCO CONTROL POLICIES IN THE PHILIPPINES..............................................8 A. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IMPLEMENTING TOBACCO CONTROL...............................................................................................................8 B. CIVIL SOCIETY IMPLEMENTING TOBACCO CONTROL........................................10 III. THE NATIONAL CAPACITY ASSESSMENT FOR TOBACCO CONTROL.............................................................................................................................. 11 IV. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY (2011- 2016): THE COUNTRY’S RESPONSE ...........................................................................15 V. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY (2011- 2016) FRAMEWORK .........................................................................................................18 STRATEGY 1: PROMOTE AND ADVOCATE FOR THE COMPLETE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE WHO-FCTC.....................................................................19 STRATEGY 2: MOBILIZE FOR PUBLIC ACTION...................................................................................22 STRATEGY 3: STRENGTHEN ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY .......................................................32 LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS.....................................................................42 GLOSSARY OF TERMS.............................................................................................................. 45 REFERENCES...............................................................................................................................49
  • 5.   NTCS 2011-2016 ANNEXES.................................................................................................... 57 ANNEX 1 TOBACCO CONTROL INTERVENTIONS IN THE PHILIPPINES..........................................................................................................................58 ANNEX 2 TOBACCO CONTROL COORDINATING BODIES ........................................................64 ANNEX 3 OTHER DOH TOBACCO CONTROL INITIATIVES..................................................... 67 ANNEX 4 ORDINANCES, MEMORANDA, GUIDELINES, EXECUTIVE ORDERS ON THE TOBACCO CONTROL, COORDINATION, AND PROTECTION OF PUBLIC HEALTH FROM UNDUE INTERFERENCE OF THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY ......................................................................................................... 72 ANNEX 5 POLICIES RELEVANT TO PROTECTION FROM SECONDHAND SMOKE IN THE PHILIPPINES..........................................................74 ANNEX 6 POLICIES RELEVANT TO TOBACCO ADVERTISING, PROMOTION, AND SPONSORSHIP (TAPS) IN THE PHILIPPINES.......................................................................................................................... 76 ANNEX 7 THE WHO FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON TOBACCO CONTROL (WHO-FCTC) ..................................................................................................... 78 ANNEX 8 THE NATIONAL CAPACITY ASSESSMENT TEAM KEY FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ..............................................................81 ANNEX 9 REGIONAL ACTION PLAN FOR TOBACCO FREE INITIATIVE IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC REGION (2010-2014)..........................................................................................................................100 ANNEX 10 FRAMEWORK FOR INTERFACE BETWEEN RAP 2010- 2014 AND MPOWER IN THE PHILIPPINES.............................................................107
  • 6. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are defined as diseases of long duration and are generally slow in progression. They are the leading causes of adult mortality and morbidity worldwide.1 The UN Member States recognize the challenge imposed by noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) rising in epidemic proportion and having a direct impact on social and economic development, contributing to poverty, and threatening the achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In September 2011, the UN Summit on NCDs released a statement in the ‘Political Declaration of the United Nation on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases,’ where member States realized the need to tackle cancer and other NCDs on a global scale. Among the interventions identified were the multi-sectoral responses and the integration of NCD policies and programmes into the broader health and development agenda.2 In the Philippines, chronic noncommunicable diseases also dominate the major causes of death. In 2004, the Department of Health (DOH) data3 showed that the ten top causes of deaths were diseases of the heart; diseases of the vascular system; malignant neoplasm; pneumonia; accidents; tuberculosis; chronic lower respiratory diseases; diabetes mellitus; certain conditions originating in the perinatal period; and nephritis and nephrosis. Among these, tobacco contributes to, or aggravates all of the causes except for accidents and nephritis.4 1 Noncommunicable Diseases in the Southeast Asia Region: 2011 Situation and Response 2 UN Summit on NCDs-Political Declaration, September 2011 3 Health Statistics, Department of Health (DOH-NEC 2004) 4 Tobacco in the Philippines: Comprehensive Country Profile (Draft.) July 2010
  • 7. 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES Globally, tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and its effects –health, social, and economic – are devastating. In the Philippines, the annual productivity losses from premature deaths for four smoking-related diseases - lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases, coronary artery disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases – ranged from US$ 65.4 million to US$ 1.08 billion using the conservative Peto-Lopez estimates (“Tobacco and Poverty Study in the Philippines,” GATS 2009). If current global trends continue, it is likewise estimated that tobacco will kill more than eight million people annually by 2030, with three-quarters of deaths being in low and middle-income countries.5 According to the World Health Organization (WHO), one-third of the world’s smokers reside in the Western Pacific Region (WPR), which comparatively has the greatest number of smokers among the other five WHO regions.5 The Philippines, being a tobacco-growing country, is one of the countries in the Western Pacific Region with high prevalence of tobacco use. The 2009 Philippines Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) shows that overall, 28.3% (17.3 million) of the population aged 15 years old and over in the Philippines currently smoke tobacco.6 The Philippines started tobacco control efforts in 1987 and since then, despite the strong lobbying of the tobacco industry, the country successfully passed the Republic Act 9211 (Tobacco Regulation Act of 2003) on June 23, 2003 as the first comprehensive national legislation on tobacco control. Among the main thrusts of the law are: (a) Promotion of a healthful environment; (b) Dissemination of information regarding the health risks associated with tobacco use; (c) Regulation and subsequent ban of all tobacco advertisements and sponsorships; (d) Regulation of the labeling of tobacco products; and (e) Protection of the youth from starting a life-long addiction to tobacco use by prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors. The WHO WPR had also developed the first Regional Action Plan (RAP 1990-1994) for the Tobacco Free Initiative in the early ‘90s. Since then, there has been a continuous progress in tobacco control initiative in the Region highlighted by the entry into force of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC) in 2005. The Philippines, being in the WPR and an eligible Party to the WHO-FCTC, is obligated to implement the treaty in order to realize the vision of the people, the communities, and the environments in the Region to be freed from tobacco.5 The Philippines became a signatory to FCTC on September 23, 2003. The Senate of the Philippines, in turn, ratified this treaty on June 06, 2005. From the treaty’s first preambular paragraph, which states, “…the Parties to this Convention are determined to give priority to their right to protect public health,” the treaty has been 5 Regional Action Plan for Tobacco Free Initiative in Western Pacific Region, 2010-2014 6 Philippines 2009 Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS)
  • 8. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 3 the most widely embraced treaty in the history of the United Nations that acknowledges the right of all people to the highest standard of health.7 Now with 174 countries as parties to the convention (WHO-FCTC report, 2012), the treaty focuses on marketing bans, public awareness, raising taxes, preventing sales to minors, and control of the illicit trade of tobacco products.8 The full implementation of the WHO-FCTC can only be achieved through engagement of all relevant sectors of government, civil society, and non-government organizations to take action within their social, cultural, occupational, and political networks and spheres of influence.5 Through a national initiative between May 3 and 12, 2011, a group of 14 national, international, and WHO health experts, in collaboration with a team from the DOH, held individual interviews with 128 individuals representing 78 institutions in order to assess the country’s tobacco control efforts in implementing the WHO-FCTC.9 Theassessmentteamreviewedtheexistingtobaccoepidemiologicdataaswellasthestatusand present development efforts of key tobacco control measures undertaken by the government in collaboration with other sectors. The assessment team has perceived the following to be the most significant challenges to continued progress of tobacco control in the Philippines: (1) Cigarettes are highly affordable in the Philippines, largely due to low taxes and a complex tax structure; (2) Effective local government efforts for creating smoke-free environments exist and non-governmental organizations are making important contributions; (3) The lack of a coordinated national cessation infrastructure/system and cessation providers hampers the implementation of the national cessation policy; (4) Mass media activities are irregular and use weak, ineffective content; (5) Graphic health information on all tobacco packages (introduced by DOH AO 2010-0013) can be implemented even though court cases are pending; and (6) The National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS 2011-2016) and Medium Term Plan (MTP 2011- 2013) are still to be developed.9 Following the National Capacity Assessment for Tobacco Control, the Philippine National Tobacco Control Strategy for 2011-2016 (NTCS 2011-2016) was developed by the team of experts from the Department of Health and other sectors of the government, with the structure and content of the plans being consistent with the strategic approach of the WHO-FCTC. The Vision is to achieve and reinforce a social environment that will help build a “Tobacco-free Philippines: Healthier People, Communities, and Environments” through well-planned and definite strategies; and the Mission is to advocate, enable, and mobilize multi-sectoral support for stronger tobacco policies and programs in line with the WHO-FCTC. The three main Strategies are to focus on the following: (1) promote and advocate for the complete implementation of WHO-FCTC in the country; (2) mobilize for public action; and 7 Manual for the Implementation of RA 9211 (Tobacco Regulation Act of 2003), UP College of Law Development Foundation, 2010 8 Council on Foreign Relations: Global Action on Non-Communicable Diseases, September 2011 9 Joint National Capacity Assessment on the Implementation of Effective Tobacco Control Policies in the Philippines, May 2011
  • 9. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES (3) strengthen the organizational capacity. The first strategy will largely be dependent on the two other strategies. Specific strategies under strategies 2 and 3 were determined based on the gaps identified by the following: a) National Capacity Assessment team; b) the WHO-RAP country actions and indicators; and c) WHO-MPOWER package, the last item of which refers to a series of six proven policies aimed at reversing the global tobacco epidemic. Under Strategy 2, sub strategies were laid down on: (1) Legislation and Policies; (2) Tobacco Taxation; (3) Governance and Local Enforcement; and (4) Alliances and Partnerships. As for Strategy 3 the NTCS specifies the following: (1) Investment Planning and Resource Management (Medium term Plan on Tobacco Control); (2) Leadership Training and Human Resource Development; (3) Surveillance, Monitoring and Knowledge Management; (4) Public awareness, education, communication and advocacy; and (5) Smoking cessation and tobacco dependence treatment. The National Tobacco Control Strategy reflects the government’s political commitment for the complete implementation of the WHO-FCTC to protect public health from the devastating effect of tobacco use; it builds on the premise that future generations of Filipinos will be given the right to live in a protected environment and communities freed from the bondage of tobacco use and relieved from the socio-economic burden of tobacco-related diseases.
  • 10. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 5 INTRODUCTION CONCEPT AND RATIONALE The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 4 million people die every year of tobacco-related diseases.10 If current global trends continue, it is estimated that tobacco will kill more than eight million people annually by 2030, and three-quarters of these deaths will be in low and middle-income countries.11 One-third of the world’s smokers reside in the Western Pacific Region (WPR), which comparatively has the greatest number of smokers among the other five WHO regions.5 The Philippines, being a tobacco growing country, is one of the countries in the Western Pacific Region with high prevalence of tobacco use with over 81 billion cigarettes being sold in the Philippines in 2008.2 The many social, economic, and health burdens from tobacco use pose a major challenge to the Philippine government to strengthen its tobacco control efforts. Tobacco kills approximately 87,600 Filipinos per year (240 deaths every day), one-third of them men in the most productive age of their lives.9 In 2005, the economic costs of tobacco use were over PHP148 billion while the revenue from tobacco industry was about PHP25.65 billion.9 All eligible parties in the WPR have ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC), the first public health treaty negotiated under the auspices of WHO. The treaty is an instrument that reaffirms the “right of all people to the highest standard of health” (Preamble to the Constitution of the WHO, 1946). 10 Advancing Tobacco Control through Evidence-Based Programs, CDC, 2010 11 Tobacco Burden Facts in the Philippines, 2008
  • 11. 6 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES The Philippines, being an eligible Party in the WPR, is bound to meet the obligations to the WHO-FCTC and to develop an effective national tobacco control program. The Philippine National Tobacco Control Strategy is the country’s response to protect public health from the damaging effects of tobacco use. The time to act is NOW. Prevalence of Tobacco Use in the Philippines Overall,28.3%(17.3million)ofpopulationaged15yearsoldandovercurrentlysmoketobacco.Of these,14.6million(47.7%)aremen,and2.8million(9.0%)arewomen.The2007PhilippineGlobal YouthTobaccoSurvey(GYTS)furthershowsthatabout27.3%currentlyuseanytobaccoproduct (34.4%, men and 19.6%, women).12 Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is likewise high. In the Philippine GATS 2009 survey, among the 61.3 million adults aged 15 and older, 48.8% (29.8 million) claimed to allow smoking in their home; while in the GYTS 2007 survey, it shows that 57.8% of youths live in homes where others smoke in their presence, and another 67.9% are around others who smoke in places outside their home.13 Among those who work indoors or in enclosed areas, 36.9% (6.1 million) were exposed to SHS at work, including 30.8% (3.7 million) non-smokers. In public transport, exposure to SHS was 55.3%; in restaurants, 33.6%; in government buildings, 25.5%; and in health care facilities, 7.6%.14 Cigarette smoking has a wide range of effects, for it affects not only the smoker, but secondhand smokers as well. Health Effects of Tobacco Use: Morbidity and Mortality of Tobacco-Related Diseases Four main diseases are generally considered to dominate NCD mortality and morbidity: (1) cardiovascular diseases (including heart disease and stroke); (2) diabetes; (3) cancers; and (4) chronic respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. These four NCDs are caused, to a large extent, by four modifiable behavioral risk factors: tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and harmful use of alcohol.15 Among the identified risk factors contributing to NCDs, tobacco is considered responsible for more than two-thirds of lung cancer; 40% of chronic respiratory diseases; and 10% of 12 Philippines Global Youth tobacco Survey (GYTS) 13 Ibid. 14 Ibid. 15 Noncommunicable Diseases in the Southeast Asia Region: 2011 Situation and Response”
  • 12. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 7 cardiovascular diseases. An estimated six million people die from tobacco use each year, causing nearly 10% of all deaths worldwide, two million more than AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.16 Smoking kills up to half of all lifetime users.17 It is an epidemic that kills ten Filipinos every hour.18 Tobacco use was responsible for over 58 thousands deaths or nearly 12% of all deaths in the Philippines in 2004, according to the WHO calculations. Almost 80% of these deaths caused by tobacco was among men.19 An estimated 6-8% of all deaths in the country are attributable to the four tobacco-related diseases causing between 23,000-35,000 tobacco- related deaths per year. These damaging effects of tobacco to life will continue until its use is controlled. Urgent action must be taken to reduce and reverse the morbidity and mortality from tobacco-related diseases. 16 Council on Foreign Relations: Global Action on Non-Communicable Diseases, September 2011 17 American Cancer Society; 2006 18 Manual for the Implementation of RA 9211 (Tobacco Regulation Act of 2003), UP College of Law Development Foundation, 2010” 19 Tobacco in the Philippines: Comprehensive Country Profile (Draft.) July 2010”
  • 13. 8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES TOBACCO CONTROL POLICIES IN THE PHILIPPINES Government Agencies Implementing Tobacco Control To reduce the use of tobacco and tackle its serious consequences, the Philippines started tobacco control efforts in 1987 and has intensified these over time. Prior to 2000, tobacco control was only a component program of the National Cardiovascular and Cancer Control Programs in the Philippines. In 1999, the Philippine parliament passed the Clean Air Act or Republic Act 8749 which included provisions for protection from SHS. The Clean Air Act identified cigarette smoke as a pollutant and instituted smoke-free indoor laws.20 In June 2003, Republic Act 9211, also known as the Tobacco Regulation Act of 2003, became a law in the Philippines. The law included landmark legislation with provisions on effective tobacco control in the country, which aimed to: (a) Promote smoke-free areas; (b) Inform the public of the health risks on tobacco use; (c) Ban all tobacco advertisement and sponsorship and restrict promotions; (d) Regulate labeling of tobacco products; and (e) Protect youth from being initiated to smoking. In May 2003, the WHO-FCTC was adopted by the 56th World Health Assembly; on February 27, 2005, it was made an international law (WHO-FCTC, 2003). The treaty calls for countries to establish programs for national, regional, and global tobacco surveillance; it also encourages countries to develop and implement tobacco control action plans. On June 06, 2005, the Philippines ratified the WHO-FCTC. (Please refer to Annex 7 of the document for the details on WHO-FCTC.) 20 Philippines 2009 Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS)
  • 14. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 9 The Government of the Philippines continues to coordinate and implement the tobacco control policies mainly through the Department of Health (DOH). Despite the fact that unofficial initiatives for tobacco control at the DOH started back in 1994 as part of the Noncommunicable Diseases Control Program, it was only in 2007 when the DOH officially designated the National Centre for Diseases Prevention and Control (NCDPC) as the coordinating unit for tobacco control.21 The DOH, together with the other agencies of the government, has issued administrative orders and joint memoranda to address the problem on tobacco use. Administrative Order 2007- 0004 or the National Tobacco Prevention and Control Program (NTPCP) was issued to define the roles and responsibilities of the different offices under DOH and of other departments. The lead office for tobacco control is the DOH-National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (NCDPC). In 2009, the DOH started implementing the Bloomberg Project entitled, “Moving to the Next Level in the Philippines: Complete Implementation of the WHO-Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC.)” The project is tasked to supplement the country’s tobacco prevention efforts, in congruence with the DOH-National Center for Health Promotion (NCHP), and to enforce of WHO-FCTC effectively. The key initiatives of the project include the development of a comprehensive National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS 2011-2016) and Medium Term Plan (MTP 2011-2013), creation of the National Tobacco Control Coordinating Office (NTCCO) within the DOH, as well as the formation of the DOH Tobacco Control Team (TCT) and Sector-Wide Anti-Tobacco (SWAT) Committee and its 11 Sub-committees for the implementation of WHO-FCTC provisions. The NTCCO is in charge of working with other sectors of the DOH to synchronize tobacco control efforts. The Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP), through the DOH- Bloomberg Initiative Project OC-401, was commissioned to facilitate the development of the National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS) for 2011-2016 through the DOH-NCHP starting May 2011. Among the other DOH initiatives are: (1) Passage of Administrative Order (AO No. 122 s. 2003) on ’Smoking Cessation Program to Support the National Tobacco Control and Healthy Lifestyle’ in 2003; (2) Passage of Administrative Order (AO 2009-0010) promoting a 100% Smoke-free environment in 2009, which became the basis of the DOH Red Orchid Awards; (3) Issuance of an Administrative Order (AO No. 2010-0013) on Graphic Health Information in 2010; (4) Passage of Department Circular 2011-0101 which has set rules and regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (after Administrative FDA Act 9711-2009) tasking the FDA (under its article III) to regulate tobacco; and (5) Formulation of the National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS 2011-2016) in 2011. 21 Joint National Capacity Assessment on the Implementation of Effective Tobacco Control Policies in the Philippines, May 2011
  • 15. 10 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES The Universal Health Care (UHC), which is the health agenda of the present administration, is directed towards “ensuring the achievement of the health system goals of better health outcomes, sustained health financing, and responsive health system by ensuring that all Filipinos, especially the disadvantaged group in the spirit of solidarity, have equitable access to affordable health care.” Among the strategic thrusts of UHC is the achievement of the “MDG max” targets on lifestyle-related Noncommunicable diseases such as cerebro-vascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and cancers. This makes tobacco control and prevention strategies one of the cornerstones in achieving the National Objectives for Health (NOH) of the DOH on NCDs. Aside from DOH, other government agencies have been involved in tobacco control. The Civil Service Commission (CSC), an independent constitutional body played fundamental role in recent years by issuing several joint memoranda with the DOH. Similarly, the Land Transportation FranchisingRegulatoryBoard(LTFRB),PhilippineNationalPolice(PNP),DevelopmentAcademy of the Philippines (DAP), and Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) played key roles focusing on smoke-free places initiatives. Using the existing communication materials, they contributed to awareness-raising-campaigns and smoking-cessation activities.22 At the sub-national level, the local government units (LGUs) also play an important role in the law implementation and have the mandate to ensure proper enforcement of RA-9211 along with members of the Philippine National Police (PNP) and other stakeholders. The DOH regional structures (Centers for Health Development) conduct tobacco control activities through their focal point for health promotion and for NCDs, especially in those regions/districts where local ordinances for creating smoke-free environments were introduced and enforced.23 (Please see Annex 1 for the LGU tobacco interventions and best practices). Civil Society Implementing Tobacco Control The Philippines also has a large and active civil society network that has proven to have an important role in keeping tobacco control in the government agenda. The non-governmental (NGO) sector includes advocacy groups; faith based organizations; academia; health professional groups; as well as local branches of international organizations. (Please see Annex 1 for the list of Non-Government and civil society group active in Tobacco Control.) (For the other tobacco control interventions by government and non-government institutions, including those of the LGUs’ and the Red Orchid awards, please refer to Annexes 1 and 3 of the document. The Tobacco Control Coordinating bodies and other DOH initiatives can be accessed in Annexes 2 and 3, respectively. Policies and Ordinances pertaining to undue Tobacco industry Interference, Smoke-Free initiatives, and on Tobacco Advertising Promotion and Sponsorship can be accessed in Annexes 4, 5, and 6, respectively.) 22 National Capacity Assessment on the Implementation of Effective Tobacco Control Policies in the Philippines, May 2011 23 Ibid.
  • 16. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 11 TOBACCO CONTROL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NATIONAL CAPACITY As a party to the WHO-FCTC, the government, represented by a DOH team joined a group of 14 national, international, and WHO health experts to assess the country’s tobacco control efforts in implementing the WHO-FCTC between May 3 and 12, 2011. The assessment team held individual interviews with 128 individuals representing 78 institutions and reviewed existing tobacco epidemiologic data as well as the status and present development efforts of key tobacco control measures undertaken by the government in collaboration with other sectors. The key informant institutions included the majority of the tobacco control stakeholders in the country, including central and regional/local governmental agencies with regulating roles or implementing responsibilities, the Senate and the Congress, the Office of the President, civil society, pharmaceutical sector, media, and academia. The assessment team found that the Philippines has made a number of achievements in tobacco control. The country has, for its part, done the following: • Ratified the WHO-FCTC • Committedtocontrolnoncommunicablediseases(NCDs),manyofwhichareattributable to tobacco use, under an MDG Max framework as part of the universal health coverage strategy • Passed RA 9211 - which was a progress of its time • Introduced important restrictions in advertising, promotion, and sponsorship • Implemented smoke-free indoor environments in many government agencies • Approved strong graphic warnings • Produced good and updated tobacco surveillance data for both adults and youth
  • 17. 12 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES • Introduced effective mechanisms to monitor the influence of the tobacco industry on government • Achieved great progress of local government in passing smoke-free ordinances that do not allow smoking areas indoors and in public places In addition, the country’s DOH officials and its strong and vibrant civil society organizations have committed themselves to tobacco control. Furthermore, the assessment team has perceived that the progress achieved in tobacco control in the Philippines can and must be accelerated. The Assessment Team considers the following to be the most significant challenges to continued progress of tobacco control in the Philippines: 1. RAISE TAXES AND PRICES OF TOBACCO Cigarettes are highly affordable in the Philippines, largely due to low taxes and a complex tax structure. Little of the revenue from these taxes has been used for health purposes, and health consequences of the existing tobacco tax system appear not to be fully appreciated by policy makers. 2. PROTECT PEOPLE FROM TOBACCO SMOKE Effective local government efforts for creating smoke-free environments exist and non- governmental organizations are making important contributions. However, there is a lack of financial and technical support necessary for the sustained countrywide reach required to deliver potentially large health benefits. 3. OFFER HELP TO QUIT TOBACCO USE There is a need for a coordinated national cessation infrastructure/system; in addition, the lack of cessation providers hampers the implementation of the national cessation policy. 4. WARN PEOPLE ABOUT THE DANGERS OF TOBACCO Mass media activities are irregular and use weak, ineffective content. Graphic health information on all tobacco packages (introduced by DOH AO 2010-0013) can be implemented even though court cases on this issue are pending.
  • 18. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 13 5. DEVELOP COORDINATION AND IMPLEMENTATION MECHANISMS The National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS 2011-2016) and Medium Term Plan (MTP 2011- 2013) are still to be developed. Coordination and funding mechanisms are not yet defined and regularly allocated, and the Sector-Wide Anti-Tobacco (SWAT) Committee has yet to be officially constituted. 6. SUSTAIN MONITORING AND EVALUATION EFFORTS The Philippines has recent, representative, and periodic tobacco surveillance data for both adults and youth. However, sustainability is a challenge. Ensure sustainability of existing surveillance efforts by integrating a core set of GATS questions and methods into ongoing surveys. 7. ENFORCE BANS ON TOBACCO ADVERTISING, PROMOTION, AND SPONSORSHIP The enforcement of the current restrictions on the tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship is weak, mainly due to poor clarification of agencies, rules and regulations, and lack of strong enforcement mechanism. Strengthen the enforcement mechanism of the current TAPS’ restrictions, through coordinated action at local jurisdictions, under the DOH leadership and coordination. To ensure the sustainability of current initiatives and further progress, the DOH identified the following key recommendations as critical and have the best potential for success in the short term. 1. Simplify the existing tobacco tax structure, significantly raise tobacco product excise taxes, and index taxes to inflation in order to raise tobacco product prices and reduce tobacco use. Also, earmark revenues from tobacco taxes for health priorities. 2. At least double the number of LGUs with 100% smoke-free policy initiatives (no designated smoking areas indoors) through dedicated financial and technical support and active involvement of non-governmental organizations. 3. Develop a coordinated national cessation infrastructure that incorporates both population and clinical approaches in a stepwise manner; build on and augment existing resources and service delivery mechanisms; commence implementation in those LGUs where the demand for cessation already exists and where smoke-free policy support is strong. 4. Initiate a sustained programme of quarterly public awareness campaigns with content proven as effective in the Philippines. 5. Given the scientific evidence supporting the use of graphic health information, the DOH should encourage and support LGU implementation.
  • 19. 14 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES 6. Finalize and officially make a National Strategy and Plan of Action that will be reviewed regularly. Key highlights of the Plan of Action would include: a. A full-time staff in charge of the National Tobacco Control Coordination Office (NTCCO) and dedicated staff and focal points from the different DOH offices. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) have a key role in the implementation and enforcement of tobacco control measures and should be fully involved in the implementation process. b. A dedicated regular budget allocated for the NTCCO and relevant offices. c. The Sector-Wide Anti-Tobacco (SWAT) Committee as an official national body with clear composition and mandate to direct and facilitate the implementation and reporting of Philippines legal binding obligations to the WHO-FCTC. d. Mechanisms of collaboration established with local governments and key stakeholders including the civil society with the exception of the participation of the representatives from the tobacco industry. (Complete findings and recommendations by the National Assessment Team can be accessed in the National Capacity Assessment Report for Tobacco Control – The Philippines, May 2010 and partly presented in Annex 8 of this document.)
  • 20. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 15 THE COUNTRY’S RESPONSE CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016): PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO The full implementation of the WHO-FCTC can only be achieved through engagement and partnerships with all relevant sectors of government, civil society and non-government organizations. The Philippine National Tobacco Control Strategy (NTCS 2011-2016) is the government’s response to its political commitment for the complete implementation of the WHO-FCTC. Following the National Capacity Assessment for Tobacco Control, the DOH-NCHP in partnership with DAP held a series of expert consultation workshops through the DOH- Bloomberg Initiative Project OC-401, where representatives from the government agencies, advocacy groups, NGOs and local government units (LGUs) participated and provided inputs to the planning for the Philippine National Tobacco Control Strategy for 2011-2016 (NTCS 2011-2016). The planning commenced on May 25-26, 2011 with the Experts’ workshop on ‘Drafting the National Tobacco Control Strategy’; this was followed by three other Regional workshops for Luzon, the Visayas, and Mindanao. The workshops took into consideration the following documents to achieve the overall objectives of the plan and to come up with the National Tobacco Control Strategy: 1. Regional Action Plan (RAP) for Tobacco Free Initiatives for WPRO (2010-2014). This plan is a product of consultative activities that began in August 2008 to sustain action on the implementation of WHO-FCTC. It consists of a comprehensive plan of action which puts emphasis on the importance of setting indicators and targets for all levels for tobacco control and on strengthening national coordinating mechanisms of countries.
  • 21. 16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES 2. The MPOWER package. This is a set of six proven policies aimed at reversing the global tobacco epidemic and includes: Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies; Protect people from tobacco smoke; Offer help to quit tobacco use; Warn about the dangers of tobacco; Enforce bans on tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship; and Raise taxes on tobacco. The package was identified in 2008 to serve as a platform to support the implementation of WHO-FCTC in countries. 3. Report of the National Capacity Assessment for Implementing WHO-FCTC in May 12, 2011. This contains the recent findings of the National Assessment Team which showed significant challenges and progress of the tobacco control programme’s implementation in the country. The Team used the MPOWER package as guide or reference for the assessment. 4. UN Summit on NCDs-Political Declaration, September 2011. This contains the draft resolution on the Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases during the United Nations’ General Assembly on 19 to 20 September 2011. The resolution aimed to address the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases worldwide, with a particular focus on developmental and other challenges and social and economic impacts of NCDs, particularly for developing countries.24 Following the refinement of the outputs of the five (5) consultative workshops together with the result of the National Capacity Assessment for Tobacco Control in May 2011, and another consultative meeting on the Finalization of the NTCS and Development of Monitoring and Evaluation (M & E) Framework in February, 2012, the result was the final NTCS 2011-2016 which included all outputs during the consultation process. (See Figure 1) The Vision is to achieve a “Tobacco-free Philippines: Healthier People, Communities, and Environments,” with a realistic view of a nation freed from the bondage of tobacco use and people relieved from the burden of tobacco-related diseases through well-planned and well- defined strategies. The Mission is to advocate, enable, and mobilize multi-sectoral support for stronger tobacco policies and programs in line with the WHO-FCTC. To achieve these, two primary goals were identified, namely: (1) to attain the lowest possible prevalence of tobacco use and (2) to attain the highest level of protection from secondhand smoke (SHS). In order to attain the first goal of having the lowest possible prevalence of tobacco use, two objectives have been identified: (1a) reduce the prevalence of adults’ current tobacco use by 2% per year and (1b) reduce the prevalence of youths’ current tobacco use by 2% per year. 24 Noncommunicable Diseases in the Southeast Asia Region: 2011 Situation and Response
  • 22. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 17 For the second goal, which is to attain the highest level of protection from secondhand smoke (SHS), two objectives have been identified: (2a) increase the level of protection from secondhand smoke by 2% per year among adults and (2b) increase the level of protection from secondhand smoke by 2% per year among 13-15 years old (y/o). Three (3) main Strategies were also determined, namely: (1) promote and advocate for the complete implementation of WHO-FCTC in the country; (2) mobilize for public action; and (3) strengthen the organizational capacity. STRATEGY 1: This overarching strategy aims to promote and advocate at the highest levels of government the complete implementation of the WHO-FCTC. This overarching strategy can only be achieved when strategies 1 and 2 are implemented. Strategy 2 was further broken down into four (4) sub strategies, Strategy 3 into other five (5) sub strategies (see below). Specific objectives, action plans, and indicators under Strategies 2 and 3 were based on the country’s needs consistent with the WHO-FCTC and WHO RAP for 2010-2014. The results of the Experts’ and Regional Consultation Workshops, the recommendations by the National Capacity Assessment team, and the WHO MPOWER packages were also used as bases for the formulation of the strategies. (See Annexes 8, 9 and 10 for details.)
  • 23. 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES FRAMEWORK CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016) PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO THE PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY (2011-2016) MISSION To advocate, enable and mobilize multi-sectoral support for stronger tobacco policies and programs in line with World Health Organization - Framework Convention (WHO-FCTC) VISION TOBACCO-FREE PHILIPPINES: HEALTHY PEOPLE, COMMUNITIES, AND ENVIRONMENTS GOAL 1: Attain the lowest possible prevalence of tobacco use Objective 1a: To reduce prevalence of adults’ and youths’ current tobacco use by 50% from the most recent baseline Objective 1b: To reduce prevalence of youths’ current tobacco use by 2% per year GOAL 2: Attain the highest level of protection from second- hand smoke Objective 2a: To increase level of protection from secondhand smoke by 2% per year among adults Objective 2b: To increase level of protection from secondhand smoke by 2% per year among 13-15 y/o STRATEGY 1: Promote and advocate for the complete implementation of the WHO FCTC STRATEGY 2: Mobilize and empower policy makers, tobacco control advocates and communities towards complete implementation of WHO FCTC 2.1 Legislation and policies 2.2 Tobacco Taxation 2.3 Governance and local enforcement 2.4 Alliance and partnerships STRATEGY 3: Strengthen organizational capacity of the Tobacco Control Program and protect the public policies and interests from tobacco industry interference 3.1 Investment planning and resource management (Medium term Plan on Tobacco control) 3.2 Leadership training and human resource development 3.3 Surveillance, monitoring, and knowledge management 3.4 Public awareness, IEC, and advocacy 3.5 Smoking cessation and tobacco dependence treatment Figure 1: National Tobacco Control Strategy (2011- 2016) Framework
  • 24. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 19 VISION: Tobacco-Free Philippines: Healthier People, Communities, and Environments MISSION: To advocate, enable, and mobilize multi-sectoral support for stronger tobacco policies and programs in line with World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC). GOAL 1: Attain the lowest possible prevalence of tobacco use Objective 1a: To reduce prevalence of adults’ current tobacco use by 2% per year Objective 1b: To reduce prevalence of youths’ current tobacco use by 2% per year GOAL 2: Attain the highest level of protection from secondhand smoke (SHS) Objective 2a: To increase level of protection from secondhand smoke by 2% per year among adults Objective 2b: To increase level of protection from secondhand smoke by 2% per year among 13-15 y/o STRATEGY 1: Promote and advocate for the complete implementation of the WHO-FCTC STRATEGY 2: Mobilize for public action Strategy 2.1: Legislation and policies Strategy 2.2: Tobacco taxation Strategy 2.3: Governance and local enforcement Strategy 2.4: Alliances and partnerships STRATEGY 3: Strengthen organizational capacity Strategy 3.1: Investment planning and resource management (Medium Term Plan on Tobacco control) Strategy 3.2: Leadership training and human resource development (Regular GATS/ GYTS, surveillance, and other Research activities) Strategy 3.3: Surveillance, monitoring, and knowledge management Strategy 3.4: Public awareness, IEC, and advocacy Strategy 3.5: Smoking cessation and tobacco dependence treatment The following table shows the specific objectives25 , key action points, and indicators of the different strategies under Strategy 2. 25 Source: RAP for the Tobacco Free Initiative in the WPR (2010-2014)
  • 25. 20 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES STRATEGY 2: MOBILIZE FOR PUBLIC ACTION Strategies Key Actions Performance Indicators 2.1. Legislation and policies in compliance with WHO-FCTC Specific objective: To develop legislation and related policies, regulations, ordinances administrative issuances and other measures to ensure timely compliance with all provisions of the WHO-FCTC, with specific reference to WHO-FCTC articles that have deadlines, approved guidelines or protocols. Legislation and policy components clearly stated in national action plans 2.1.1 Develop tracking and monitoring system for illicit trade of tobacco products • Policy for the infrastructure and system in place • Data available for action 2.1.2 Review and develop policy related to product ingredients’ regulations. • Policy approved and implemented 2.1.3 Push for legislation of packaging and labeling pending in the Congress 2.1.3.1 Review and study how to enforce AO 2010-0013 (Graphic Health Information) • Passage of legislation • Recommendations for action on how to enforce AO 2010- 0013 2.1.4 Amend RA 9211 (Tobacco Regulation Act) to make it WHO-FCTC compliant • Draft bills amending RA 9211 submitted to Congress 2.1.5 Address Tobacco Industry Interference 2.1.5.1 Identify areas in WHO-FCTC Art. 5.3 not covered by DOH- CSC Joint Memorandum Circular (JMC) 2010-01 and other laws, and draw up a legislative proposal • WHO-FCTC Article 5.3 incorporated in tobacco control (TC) ordinances in 50% of cities and municipalities • Legislative proposal submitted to Congress on areas where WHO-FCTC Art. 5.3 are not covered by JMC and other laws 2.2 Tobacco taxation Specific Objectives: To introduce and implement tax and price measures that will result in the reduction of tobacco consumption; and to dedicate a significant proportion of the revenue from tobacco taxes to health promotion and tobacco control, including treatment for tobacco dependence. 2.2.1 Simplify the tobacco taxation structure and significantly raise tobacco taxes with indexation of prices for inflation Law passed with the following elements: • Increase in tobacco taxes • Index of price for inflation • Unitary tax rate • Removal of price classification freeze (1996) Table 1: Strategies, Key Actions and Performance Indicators under Strategy 2
  • 26. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 21 2.2.2 Allocate from tobacco taxes revenues for health priorities, social health insurance coverage, and health promotion • Increased percentage of proportion of revenue from tobacco taxes allocated to health promotion and social health insurance coverage • Tobacco taxes revenues allocated for health priorities, and included in the consolidated tobacco tax bill • Health Promotion Foundation (HPF) established with funding from tobacco tax (included in the legislation) 2.2.3 Increase the licensing fee of retail sales of tobacco products. • 100% increase in licensing fee/business permit in 50% of LGUs 2.2.4 Strengthen the multi- disciplinary mechanism to implement and monitor a strategy for effective tobacco tax and pricing to reduce tobacco consumption • Monitoring tool/s and results Governance and local enforcement Specific objectives: To implement and enforce laws and policies through national coordinating mechanisms or their equivalent, protect policies and programmes from the influence and interference of the tobacco industry, and promote good governance measures (i.e. strategic vision, participation, transparency and accountability, with specific reference to healthy cities, and islands, communities, and settings) to achieve tobacco control.15 2.3.1 Enforce existing policies on Tobacco Advertising, Promotion, and Sponsorship (TAPS) ban • 25% of municipalities and cities enforcing TAPS ban 2.3.2 Develop guidelines for effective monitoring of TAPS based on WHO-FCTC • Guidelines on monitoring TAPS ban Alliance and partnership Specific objective: To work with relevant tobacco control stakeholders to achieve comprehensive and sustainable tobacco control and avoid interference form the tobacco industry.15 2.4.1 Organize Regional Tobacco Control Network (RTCN)/ Regional Committee on Tobacco Control (RCTC) in every region • Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed • RTCN/RCTC in all regions 2.4.2 Organize Sector-Wide Anti- Tobacco (SWAT) Committee • MOU signed
  • 27. 22 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES STRATEGY 2: MOBILIZE FOR PUBLIC ACTION This is to mobilize and empower policy-makers, tobacco control advocates and communities towards complete implementation of the WHO-FCTC through legislation and policies, tobacco taxation, governance and enforcement, and alliances and partnerships for changing social norms.26 STRATEGY 2.1: LEGISLATION AND POLICIES IN COMPLIANCE WITH WHO-FCTC 2.1.1 Develop tracking and monitoring system for illicit trade of tobacco products27 Tax authorities do not effectively monitor cigarette production, and many cigarettes reported to be intended for export or sale in duty free outlets are sold domestically. The government loses significant revenues because of tobacco tax evasion and avoidance. Over 20% of cigarette production is estimated to evade all domestic tobacco taxes. Weak tax administration is a major contributor to tobacco tax evasion. While there have been recent efforts to address illicit trade, these have been undertaken as part of a broader anti- smuggling agenda in the Bureau of Customs and there are no programs that specifically target tobacco products. While there have been some seizures of cigarettes as part of these anti-smuggling efforts, addressing illicit tobacco trade and other tobacco tax evasion activities appears to be a low priority. Moreover, the regional partnerships that have been demonstrated to be effective elsewhere in addressing illicit trade in tobacco products do not exist in the Philippines. In addition to tax evasion, there are also significant opportunities for tax avoidance. The multi- tiered tax structure facilitates tax avoidance as many brands are misclassified into lower tax tiers, a problem exacerbated by the price classification freeze. Performance Indicators: • Policy for the infrastructure and system in place • Data available for action 2.1.2 Review and develop policy related to product ingredients’ regulations Strengthen tobacco control policies through regulation of the contents and emission of tobacco products and through regulation of product disclosures. Tobacco regulation has the potential to contribute to reducing tobacco-attributable disease and premature death by reducing the 26 Regional Action Plan for Tobacco Free Initiative in Western Pacific Region, 2010-2014 27 National Capacity Assessment, section VIII.2.4.
  • 28. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 23 attractiveness of tobacco products, reducing their addictiveness (or dependence liability), or reducing overall toxicity (WHO-FCTC). Performance Indicator: Policy approved and implemented 2.1.3 Push for legislation of packaging and labeling pending in the Congress27 DOH issued Administrative Order 2010-13 (AO 2010-0013) in May 2010. This Order enables DOH to implement rotating evidence-based Graphic Health Information (GHI) (30% of front and 60% of back of package). The AO requires Graphic Health Information on tobacco product packages, adopting measures to ensure that tobacco product packaging and labeling do not promote tobacco by any means that are false, misleading, deceptive, or likely to create an erroneous impression and matters related thereto. Despite the tobacco industry’s interference, the DOH may push forward on implementing pictorial health warnings. It has the authority to implement the AO in all jurisdictions except those that are currently under legal dispute. By virtue of the Constitution and the Administrative Code of 1987, DOH has the authority to ensure propagation of health information. Pending final resolution of court cases, DOH could assert its authority everywhere except in Tanauan, Southern Luzon, Malolos, Central Luzon and in the Metro Manila cities of Marikina, Pasig, and Parañaque. DOH argues that the legal basis of the AO is both the Consumer Protection Act, a national law, and made consistent with WHO-FCTC and its guidelines. Performance Indicator: Passage of legislation 2.1.3.1 Review and study how to enforce AO 2010- 0013 (Graphic Health Information) DOH should issue guidelines on Graphic Health Information (GHI) and misleading descriptors; ensure that effective, distinct, and highly visible graphic health information is placed on tobacco product packages; and ensure that tobacco product packaging and labeling do not promote a tobacco product by any means that is false, misleading, deceptive, or likely to create an erroneous impression about the product and its characteristics, health effects, hazards, or emissions. 27 National Capacity Assessment, section VI.1.2.2
  • 29. 24 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES Given the scientific evidence supporting the use of graphic health information, LGUs should be encouraged to implement and promote this initiative with support from DOH. Performance Indicator: Recommendations for action on how to enforce AO 2010- 0013 (Graphic Health Information) 2.1.4 Amend RA 9211 (Tobacco Regulation Act) to make it WHO-FCTC compliant The Sector-Wide Anti-Tobacco (SWAT) Committees should review and identify the gaps and loopholes in RA No. 9211 to make it compliant to WHO-FCTC. Key actions to support any amendment should include the following, among others: • Convene the SWAT Committee; • Identify provisions to be amended, as well as recommendations and proposed actions; and • Strongly advocate and lobby to amend RA No. 9211. Performance Indicator: Draft bills amending RA 9211 submitted to Congress 2.1.5 Address Tobacco Industry Interference 2.1.5.1 Identify areas in WHO- FCTC Article 5.3 not covered by DOH-CSC Joint Memorandum Circular (JMC) 2010-01 and other laws, and draw up a legislative proposal28 Enforcing the Civil Service Commission (CSC) and Department of Health (DOH) Joint Memo Circular No. 2010-01 as well as pursuing the activities of the SWAT Committee on Art. 5.3 should be considered as a priority for the governmental structures in their efforts to protect public health from the tobacco industry interference (TII). CSC-DOH Joint MC No. 2010-01 bans all government officials and employees from interacting with the tobacco industry, unless when strictly necessary for effective regulation, supervision, or control. Monitoring and identifying the strategies employed by the tobacco industry to undermine, delay, and hinder the tobacco control efforts of the country should be a regular activity and preferably conducted by LGUs and other civil society organization co-funded by the government to ensure consistency, transparency, and sustainability. 18 National Capacity Assessment, section II.3.5/III.3.3
  • 30. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 25 In addition, regular awareness campaigns displaying tobacco industry strategies should be implemented in order to increase public and policy-makers’ familiarity with and vigilance to the subject; and to increase indirectly their participation and compliance with existing tobacco control laws. Another essential element of a supportive environment that would promote the proper implementation of Article 5.3 is for the whole bureaucracy of the government to be oriented about the provisions of Article 5.3. Soliciting commitment to support and comply with provisions of Article 5.3 should also be done. In this way, interference by the tobacco industry could be thwarted, especially if the violations become part of the code of ethics of the whole bureaucracy. This strategy aims to widen the adoption of Article 5.3 not only in the government agencies under the executive branch, but also in offices under the legislative and judiciary branches of government, including the presidential appointees. It is expected that the entire bureaucracy, from the national level and regional levels to the field offices, adopt and comply with said provisions. This can be achieved by implementing the following measures: 1. Increase the number of national government agencies and other government institutions adopting and implementing Joint Memorandum Circular-Civil Service Commission and DOH (CSC-DOH JMC No. 2010-01) policy and guide; and 2. Forge partnership with other relevant agencies not covered by the JMC to adopt Article 5.3. Performance Indicators: • WHO-FCTC Article 5.3 incorporated in Tobacco Control ordinances in 50% of cities and municipalities • Legislative proposal submitted to Congress on areas where WHO- FCTC 5.3 are not covered by JMC and other laws. STRATEGY 2.2: TOBACCO TAXATION 2.2.1 Simplify the tobacco taxation structure and significantly raise tobacco taxes with indexation of prices for inflation29 As stipulated in Republic Act 9334 or the Sin Tax Law of 2004, a four-tier excise tax system is currently implemented for cigarettes. With this system, lower priced cigarettes are taxed at a low rate while higher priced cigarettes are taxed at a high rate, thus creating a wide price 29 National Capacity Assessment, section VIII.3.1 /VIII. 1.1
  • 31. 26 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES gap between higher and lower priced classes of cigarettes. Replacing the Philippines’ existing multi-tiered specific cigarette excise tax structure with a uniform specific tax on all cigarettes would eliminate opportunities for tax avoidance through misclassification of brands and send the clear message that all cigarettes are equally harmful. Eight bills addressing tobacco product taxation have been filed in the current Congress that would address the problem of highly affordable cigarettes in the Philippines by significantly increasing taxes and greatly simplifying the existing, complex tax structure; such tax increases will prevent smoking initiation, promote cessation, lower consumption among continuing smokers, and reduce the death, disease, and economic costs that result from smoking. Performance Indicators: • Law passed with the following elements: • Increase in Tobacco Taxes • Index of price for inflation • Unitary tax rate • Removal of price classification freeze (1996) 2.2.2 Allocate from tobacco taxes revenues for health priorities, social health insurance coverage, and health promotion30 Earmarking of tobacco tax revenues for health purposes has been small in recent years – 2.5% of the new tax revenues from the 2008 tax increase was earmarked for Philippine Health Insurance (PhilHealth) and 2.5% was earmarked for disease prevention. Discussions are ongoing about expanding the earmarking of tobacco tax revenues to attain the Millennium Development Goals and establish effective health promotion mechanisms and structures. Of particular interest is the earmarking of tobacco tax revenues for health sector reform and a universal health care program. These efforts should take into account the changing patterns of disease associated with economicdevelopmentandconcernsaboutthehealthandotherinequitiesthatareexacerbated by tobacco use. This includes dedicating a portion of tobacco tax revenues for comprehensive tobacco control programs that include, but are not limited to: supporting community level interventions; engaging in public education campaigns about the harms from tobacco use; providing support to smokers trying to quit smoking; and preventing young people from taking up tobacco use. 30 National Capacity Assessment, section VIII.3.2.
  • 32. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 27 This strategy shall ensure that the percentage of revenues as agreed by Department of Budget and Management (DBM) and DOH from tobacco taxes is allocated for tobacco control programs, specifically for health priorities, social health insurance coverage, and health promotion. Performance Indicators: • Increased percentage of proportion of revenue from tobacco taxes allocated to health promotion and social health insurance coverage • Tobacco taxes revenues allocated for health priorities, and included in the consolidated tobacco tax bill • Health Promotion Foundation (HPF) established with funding from tobacco tax (included in the legislation) 2.2.3. Increase the licensing fee of retail sales of tobacco products31 An increase in the licensing fee of retail sales would result in rise by retailers on the prices to compensate for the cost. Therefore, higher tobacco prices would lead to a decrease in tobacco consumption. Local government units should be encouraged to increase the licensing fee/business permit of the retail sales of tobacco products by 100% based on the existing fee. Performance Indicator: 100% increase in licensing fee/business permit in 50% of LGUs 2.2.4. Strengthen the multi-disciplinary mechanism to implement and monitor a strategy for effective tobacco tax and pricing to reduce tobacco consumption32 Philippine tax administrators’ capacity for tracking and tracing should be further strengthened by licensing all involved in tobacco production and distribution, and resources should be allocated to enforcing tax policies. Several steps should be undertaken to strengthen tobacco tax administration in the Philippines. A well-established monitoring system should be put in place, one that employs new technologies for monitoring the production and distribution of tobacco products. These new technologies include adoption of the new generation of more sophisticated, hard-to- counterfeit tax stamps and a tracking-and-tracing system that can follow tobacco products through the distribution chain. 31 National Capacity Assessment, section VIII.3.4. 32 Ibid.
  • 33. 28 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES This strategy would create a proactive and working multi-disciplinary body that shall develop, implement, and monitor a strategy for effective tobacco taxation and pricing which would result in reduced tobacco consumption. The body should collaborate with other partners, especially non-governmental organizations and media, to gain support for tobacco tax measures. Performance Indicator: Monitoring tool/s and results STRATEGY 2.3: GOVERNANCE AND LOCAL ENFORCEMENT 2.3.1 Enforce existing policies on Tobacco Advertising, Promotion, and Sponsorship (TAPS) ban33 At local levels, the enforcement falls under the authority of the DOH-CHD regulatory officers and the city and municipal officials (Mayor’s police force as well the local PNP police officers). Although the Tobacco Regulation Act does not have a clear mechanism for enforcement, monitoring of compliance, and reporting, the LGUs have competencies to introduce “local ordinances” that may introduce clarification of roles among enforcing agencies, coordination, duties of compliances, enforcing actions, monitoring of compliance, reporting etc. Sofar,theassessmentteamcouldfindonlyoneJointMemorandumCircular(JMC)betweenDOH and Department of Local and Interior Government (DILG) (DOH CHD 4A and DILG 4A/2010) covering region 4A. The model local ordinance recommended by the Joint Memorandum includes mechanism for enforcement, with coordination and roles among institutions, duties of compliances, enforcing actions, monitoring of compliance. However, the model does not include a reporting mechanism among the enforcing institutions and to the public. Performance Indicator: 25% of municipalities and cities enforcing TAPS ban 2.3.2 Develop guidelines for effective monitoring of TAPS based on WHO-FCTC34 There is a need to strengthen the enforcement mechanism of the current TAPS’ restrictions, through coordinated action at local jurisdictions, under the DOH leadership and coordination. 33 National Capacity Assessment, section VII.2.1.4 34 National Capacity Assessment, section VII.3.1.1
  • 34. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 29 There are certain provisions included in the Tobacco Act that may be enforced nationwide by DOH FDA (e.g., ban of TAPS on internet, TV, radio, cross-border TAPS, etc.), while at the local level the DOH-CHD teams, in collaboration with the LGUs, could focus on their areas of authority within the respective jurisdictions. The DOH should take leadership in the development of monitoring tools to collect information on TAPS restrictions enforcement actions, monitoring compliance that can be implemented at local levels by the regional DOH CHD regulatory officers and local health workers, in collaboration with LGU enforcing agents with reporting duties to the DOH and the public. Inspection check lists should include TAPS ban and eventually, the score cards could add indicators on TAPS. Action on law violations and monitoring of compliance could be shared between central and regional levels. Performance Indicator: Guidelines on monitoring TAPS ban STRATEGY 2.4: ALLIANCE AND PARTNERSHIP 2.4.1 Organize Regional Tobacco Control Network (RTCN)/ Regional Committee on Tobacco Control (RCTC) in every region To ensure an efficient and effective multi-sectoral implementation of the National Tobacco Control Program, a RTCN/RTCC shall be organized in every region. Members of the RTCN/ RTCC shall be composed of tobacco control advocates from government agencies, non- governmental organizations, other civil society organization, academe, specialty societies, and representatives from LGUs. RTCN/RTCC should oversee the planning, implementation and monitoring of tobacco programs and activities (pertaining to FCTC Articles) at the regional level. Performance Indicators: Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed RTCN/RCTC in all regions
  • 35. 30 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES Table 2: Strategies, Key Actions, and Performance Indicators under Strategy 3 STRATEGY 3: STRENGTHEN ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY Strategies Key Actions Performance Indicators 3.1. Investment planning and resource management Specific objective: To develop multi-year financial plans for government-supported tobacco control programmes, including mechanisms that raise levels of funding through multiple sources, e.g. tobacco taxes, private sector support, donor aid, community funds, and social health insurance.15 3.1.1 Strengthen the capacity of the National Tobacco Control Coordinating Office (NTCCO) Budget included in General Appropriation Act (GAA) 3.1.2 Establish mechanisms for collaboration with other key stakeholders (which include government and non-government) regarding funding for tobacco control initiatives • Written guidelines for collaboration • Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) 3.1.3 Strengthen the capacity of local governments to include Tobacco Control (TC) in their Annual Investment Plan for Health (AIPH) • Template for Tobacco Control Annual Investment Plan for Health • Inclusion of TC activities with dedicated budget in AIPH of LGUs • Number of LGUs with tobacco control included in the Investment plan • No. of LGUs with TC Committee 2.4.2 Organize SWAT Committee35 Department Order (DO) 2011-0029 proposed a functional structure, the Sector Wide Anti- Tobacco Committee (SWAT Committee), to be responsible for implementing the WHO-FCTC provisions. This committee has no tobacco industry representation and addresses the country public health interests by having a comprehensive scope, membership, and operational implementation targets on the various WHO-FCTC articles. Eleven sub-committees of this sector wide structure were organized and are already operational with terms of reference (TOR) defining scope of work and expected outputs. SWAT members are government stakeholders, civil societies, and the academia. The tobacco industry and its front groups were not invited to be part of SWAT. In this regard, DOH needs to clearly and formally define the SWAT mandate, roles, and membership; ensure clear policies to prevent tobacco industry participation and interference with its work; and enable collaboration with other government authorities in both decision taking and technical levels. (See Annexes 2 and 3 for the composition of the SWAT sub- committees). Performance Indicator: Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed Table 2 below presents the specific objectives, key action points, and indicators of the different strategies under Strategy 3. 35 National Capacity Assessment, section II.2.4.
  • 36. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 31 Strategies Key Actions Performance Indicators 3.1.4 Establish incentive mechanisms for LGUs with strong Tobacco Control efforts (i.e., Red Orchid Award) Ensure funding for the incentives • Red Orchid Award (ROA) sustained • Grants to LGUs effectively implementing TC 3.2 Leadership training and human resource development Specific Objective: To support implementation of WHO-FCTC provisions by developing and enabling champions, leaders, and advocates at multiple levels to lead tobacco control efforts and to continuously train and provide tobacco control programme implementers with appropriate skills and competencies.15 3.2.1 Increase capacity of key stakeholders and local government units in leading TC activities in the country including resistance to Tobacco Industry Interference (TII) • Number of training programs conducted • Database of TC leaders/ advocates produced from the training programs with the goal of successfully enacting TC ordinance 3.3 Surveillance, Monitoring, and knowledge management Specific Objectives: To generate reliable and updated information and evidence to guide programme planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation; and to gather intelligence and monitor industry actions.15 3.3.1 Develop national research surveillance and monitoring agenda Include tobacco control research in the National Unified Health Research Agenda (NUHRA) • National research surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation agenda developed • Number of TC researches included in the NUHRA 3.3.2 Ensure funding support for the conduct of research surveillance and monitoring agenda • Inclusion in the DOH as well as other agencies (development partners) funding for the research agenda • Inclusion of TC research in NUHRA budget • Number of development partners providing funding support for the agenda. 3.3.4 Conduct research regularly • GYTS, GATS, National Nutrition and Health Survey 3.3.5 Strengthen the use of evidence for policy and action • Number of policy issuances using as evidence surveillance, monitoring, evaluation research data 3.3.5 Disseminate research and surveillance data results • Number of fora conducted • Number of policy brief developed and distributed
  • 37. 32 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES Strategies Key Actions Performance Indicators 3.4 Public awareness, education, communication, and advocacy Specific Objectives: To inform different audiences of (a) the hazards of tobacco use and exposure and (b) effective interventions; and to mobilize stakeholders to change social norms and eventually eliminate tobacco use in society.15 3.4.1 Develop and implement evidence- based communication and advocacy plans including evaluation of effectiveness • Evidence-based communication plan implemented (Effective implementation of communication and advocacy plan through KAP surveys) 3.4.2 Ensure funding for implementation of communication and advocacy plan • Regular budget on IEC for Tobacco Control (Inclusion in the DOH National Center for Health Promotion (DOH-NCHP) as well as other development agencies’ funding for such plan) 3.5 Tobacco dependence treatment and smoking cessation Specific objective: To develop and integrate treatment of tobacco dependence in the health care system with particular emphasis on primary health care.15 3.5.1 Develop and implement National Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for smoking cessation • National CPGs developed and fully implemented • Number of health workers trained on CPGs 3.5.2 Establish/ strengthen the infrastructure and referral system for tobacco dependence treatment and other related services • Policy for treatment and referral for tobacco dependence treatment and related services • Number of functional smoking cessation clinics • Number of TB DOTS facilities with integrated smoking cessation services 3.5.3 Ensure financing for treatment of tobacco dependence under the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) • Financing scheme on the treatment of tobacco dependence developed and implemented • Number of smokers who availed of the benefit • Number of facilities that availed of the benefit STRATEGY 3: STRENGTHEN ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY This is to strengthen organizational capacity of government tobacco control programmes to protect public health policy processes from tobacco industry interests and interference and to move towards complete implementation of the WHO-FCTC through improvements in: (a) investment planning and resource management; (b) leadership training and human resources development; (c) surveillance, monitoring, and knowledge management; (d) public awareness, education, communication, and advocacy; and (e) tobacco dependence treatment and smoking cessation.
  • 38. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 33 STRATEGY 3.1: INVESTMENT PLANNING AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3.1.1 Strengthen the capacity of the National Tobacco Control Coordinating Office (NTCCO)36 The DOH should ensure the necessary human resources for coordinating the NTCCO work (a full time coordinator that could be newly assigned or identified from existing staff, and also focal points for tobacco control in other DOH departments at national and local level). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) have a key role in the implementation and enforcement of tobacco control measures and should be fully involved in the implementation process. Performance Indicators: Budget included in General Appropriations Act (GAA) 3.1.2 Establish mechanisms for collaboration with other key stakeholders (which include government and non-government) regarding funding for tobacco control initiatives To ensure that all activities and outputs are implemented and accomplished based on the agreed timeline, there is a need to work towards and advocate for increasing the current levels of funding for tobacco control and expanding the sources of funds, to include but not limited to, national and local government budgets, contributions from external support organizations, and funds from the private sector, community, and social health insurance. (RAP for Tobacco Free Initiative in the WPR, 2010-2014) Performance Indicators: • Written guidelines for collaboration • Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) 3.1.3 Strengthen the capacity of local governments to include Tobacco Control in their Annual Investment Plan for Health (AIPH)37 The DOH should ensure dedicated and regular funding for tobacco control within the DOH budget, at the central and regional levels, based on needs identified by the NTCCO/NCHP and the regional tobacco control structures. As the Local Government Units (LGUs) are currently in the frontline of collaboration with the DOH-Centers for Health Development (DOH-CHDs) for implementing various policies, they should also dedicate tobacco control funding on a regular basis as part of their province-, municipality- or city-wide investment plans for health. 36 National Capacity Assessment, section II.3.1. 37 National Capacity Assessment, section II.3.2
  • 39. 34 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES Performance Indicators: • Template of Tobacco Control Annual Investment Plan for Health • Inclusion of Tobacco Control (TC) activities with dedicated budget in Annual Investment Plan (AIP) of LGUs • No. of LGUs with TC included in the AIP • No. of LGUs with TC Committee 3.1.4 Establish incentive mechanisms for LGUs with strong Tobacco Control efforts (i.e., Red Orchid Award) and ensure funding for the incentives38 The DOH should collaborate with the LGUs, they being the essential players in advancing the WHO-FCTC compliance in the Philippines, and strongly support their efforts in tobacco control. Apart from enforcement work and local initiatives for raising awareness, major opportunities of the LGUs should include increasing collaboration with local health services in providing cessation support (toll free quit lines) and coordinating initiatives with civil society. Also, the collaboration regarding the Red Orchid Award strategy39 should include evaluation of multi-sectoral participation and of local impact. Regular funding from local governments should be made available for tobacco control implementation and enforcement initiatives. PhilHealth could be pursued as a possible source of funds for the LGUs’ tobacco control activities. Performance Indicators: • Red Orchid Award (ROA) sustained • Grants to LGUs effectively implementing Tobacco Control STRATEGY 3.2: LEADERSHIP TRAINING AND HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 3.2.1IncreasecapacityofkeystakeholdersandlocalgovernmentunitsinleadingTCactivities in the country including resistance to Tobacco Industry Interference (TII)40 Several tobacco control training programs that include a TAPS section were conducted in the last two years, especially targeting health workers at regional level and some from the local government unit level. The training under the broad framework of MPOWER is conducted by core trainers from the DOH Central Office in partnership with civil society based on a 38 National Capacity Assessment, section II.3.6 39 This refers to special citation on Implementation of 100% Tobacco free Environment 40 National Capacity Assessment, section VII.2.1.7/ II.2.6.
  • 40. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 35 module prepared by the DOH Health Human Resource Development Bureau (DOH-HHRDB) and enhanced by partners from academe and civil society, in the form of training of trainers. Concrete enforcement of TAPS restrictions is yet to be part of the training. Other organizations have conducted training of the police officers (FIDS, etc.). Reports of evaluation of training have not yet been made available as of this writing. The DOH CHDs collaborate with the local government authorities (LGUs) for covering training needs for health workers in their jurisdiction, mostly limited to smoke-free policies, while cessation services and awareness raising campaigns are still not fully addressed. Performance Indicators: • No. of training programs conducted • Database of TC leaders/advocates produced from the training programs with the goal of successfully enacting TC ordinance STRATEGY 3.3: SURVEILLANCE, MONITORING, AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT 3.3.1 Develop national research surveillance and monitoring agenda 3.3.1.1 Include tobacco control research in the National Unified Health Research Agenda (NUHRA) This would entail developing a national research agenda on tobacco control. To support this, the following Sub-Committee on Article 2041 strategies should be pursued: • Collaborate with World Health Organization (WHO) in the development of general guidelines or procedures for defining collection, analysis, and dissemination of tobacco- related surveillance data; • Initiate and cooperate with competent international and regional intergovernmental organizations and other bodies in the conduct of research and scientific assessments; • Promote and strengthen the training of and the support for all those engaged in tobacco control activities, including research, implementation and evaluation; • Facilitate/Provide inputs in the development of the national surveillance system for determining the magnitude and patterns of determinants and other social, economic, and health indicators related to the consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke; • Facilitate financial and technical assistance from international and regional intergovernmental organizations and other bodies for epidemiological surveillance and information exchange; and 41 TOR on SWAT Sub-Committee on Article 20, Department of Health
  • 41. 36 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES • Provide an opportunity for exchange of information on the results of research studies and surveys among the members of the sub-committees. Performance Indicators: • National research surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation agenda developed • No. of TC researches included in the NUHRA 3.3.2 Ensure funding support for the conduct of the research surveillance and monitoring agenda FCTC Article 20 (#3) states that “The Parties to the Convention recognizes the importance of financial and technical assistance from international and regional intergovernmental organizations and other bodies where each shall endeavor to establish progressively a national system for the epidemiological surveillance of tobacco consumption and related social, economic, and health indicators.” FCTC Article 20 (#5) also states that “Parties should cooperate with regional and international organizations and financial and development institutions, to promote and encourage provision of technical and financial resources to the Secretariat to assist developing country Parties and Parties with economies in transition to meet their commitments on research, surveillance, and exchange of information.” Performance Indicators: • Inclusion in the DOH as well as other agencies (development partners) funding for research agenda • Inclusion of TC research in NUHRA budget • Number of development partners providing funding support for the agenda 3.3.3 Conduct research regularly42 The Philippines has recent, representative and periodic tobacco surveillance data for both adults and youth. Two main challenges to sustain prevalence surveillance have been identified: Although DOH partly funds some surveys like the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) and the National Nutrition and Health Survey (NNHS), funding for tobacco surveillance is still largely 42 National Capacity Assessment section III.3.1.
  • 42. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 37 dependent on external sources. This is relevant especially in the case of GATS, which in its present form is an expensive survey. Adult prevalence data is a key to monitor the tobacco epidemic. However, the existing surveys to measure adult prevalence use methodologies that produce non-comparable data. Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), which is an internationally validated survey, is not sustainable in its present form. The national assessment team recommends the use of the Core Adult Tobacco Survey (CATS), which was developed by the WHO Western Pacific Regional Office (WPRO) based on the GATS survey under the framework of Tobacco-Free Plan-It. In this way, periodic tobacco surveillance data will be collected with no need for additional funding and made available to the institutions responsible for implementing the tobacco control policies. Performance Indicator: GYTS, GATS, National Nutrition and Health Survey 3.3.4 Strengthen the use of evidence for policy and action43 Although the National Epidemiology Center (NEC) and other agencies have produced significant amounts of tobacco surveillance data, relatively small efforts are done to translate these data into information relevant to the decision makers and to the public and by these to facilitate concrete action and policy change. There is still a need to disaggregate national data into regional data for better appreciation by local government units. Performance Indicator: No. of policy issuances using as evidence surveillance, monitoring, evaluation research data 3.3.5. Disseminate research and surveillance data results44 The DOH National Epidemiology Center (NEC) needs to take the leadership in transforming collected data into information that would be relevant for the decision makers and understandable for the public, which would result in the facilitation of policy change and support of the population in implementing the necessary measures. 43 National Capacity Assessment section III.2.2. 44 National Capacity Assessment section III.3.2.
  • 43. 38 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES According to the DOH Department Order (DO) No. 29 of February 7, 2011, NEC has the mandate to develop and institutionalize a national reporting and surveillance for the tobacco control program. In this regard, NEC needs to seek for additional partners’ support and use their capacity through the work of the SWAT subcommittee on surveillance. Performance Indicators: No. of policy issuances using as evidence surveillance, monitoring, evaluation research data STRATEGY 3.4: PUBLIC AWARENESS, EDUCATION, COMMUNICATION, AND ADVOCACY 3.4.1 Develop and implement evidence-based communication and advocacy plans including evaluation of effectiveness To promote and strengthen public awareness of tobacco control issues, there is a need to develop and implement evidence-based communication and advocacy plans and programs using all available communication tools. In relation to this, the SWAT Sub-Committee on Article 1235 should: • Prepare an integrated and cohesive plan for communication, education, and training on Tobacco Control in coordination with the other sub-committees on FCTC Articles; • Establish an infrastructure to support education, communication, and training; • Facilitate leveling of key messages on tobacco control among the stakeholders and advocates for tobacco control; • Use all available means to raise awareness, provide enabling environments, and facilitate behavioral and social change; • Actively involve the civil society in the relevant phases of public awareness programs; • Ensure that education, communication, and training programs include a wide range of information on tobacco industry, its strategies, and its products; and • Monitor, evaluate, and revise education, communication and its measures. Performance Indicator: Evidence-based communication plan implemented (Effective implementation of communication and advocacy plan through Knowledge Attitude and Practice or KAP surveys) 45 TOR SWAT Sub-Committee on FCTC Article 12, Department of Health
  • 44. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 39 3.4.2 Ensure funding for implementation of communication and advocacy plan46 DOH has limited financial resources (approx. PHP10 million) to produce materials and purchase air time, therefore materials are not supplied to regions in sufficient quantity and no national campaign is possible with the existing funds. Currently, approximately 60% of NCHP budget for campaigns goes to the regions while the remaining 40% goes to DOH for all other activities, including materials’ production, testing, media buying, etc. The DOH should pursue the expansion of the financial resources to produce and air mass media campaigns. A possible means to mobilize more resources to produce and air mass media campaigns could be through the designation of a part of tax revenues to this purpose. The department should initiate high level engagement with the private sector (e.g. media companies and cinemas) to secure free or highly discounted time and space. Performance Indicator: Regular budget on IEC for Tobacco Control (inclusion in the DOH-National Center for Health Promotion (NCHP) as well as other development agencies’ funding for such plan) STRATEGY 3.5: TOBACCO DEPENDENCE TREATMENT AND SMOKING CESSATION 3.5.1 Develop and implement national Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for tobacco dependence treatment (smoking cessation)47 The 2004 NEC cessation evaluation study identified the lack of standard cessation operating procedures as a contributory factor to the failure to implement the national cessation policy. The work initiated by the DOH for reviewing the evidence-based cessation interventions with professional groups like the Philippine Medical Association (PMA) and Philippine College of Chest Physicians (PCCP) and the academe and for eventually establishing a set of cessation practice guidelines and models needs to be accelerated. Guidelines need to be finalized and endorsed, and widely disseminated across the entire health system (in both the private and public sectors), and across all relevant programs. The DOH should continue its efforts on training of trainers, several of which have been initiated in Centers for Health Development (CHDs). In this way, there will be an expanded pool of cessation trainers to assist LGUs and other government entities for providing cessation services to their population and employees, e.g. the Civil Service Commission (CSC). In parallel, health 46 National Capacity Assessment sections VI 2.2.2/ VI.2.3.2 37 National Capacity Assessment sections V.2.2/.V.3.2/V.3.3.3.
  • 45. 40 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES 48 National Capacity Assessment, section V.2.4 professional societies could also designate cessation trainers to handle cessation capacity building in the private sector. The DOH should adopt a set of standardized national training modules and tools. Performance Indicators: • National Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for smoking cessation developed and fully implemented • No. of health workers trained on CPGs 3.5.2 Establish/strengthen the infrastructure and referral system for tobacco dependence treatment and other related services There is a need for a coordinated national cessation infrastructure that incorporates both population and clinical approaches in a stepwise manner, and builds on and augments existing resources and service delivery mechanisms. The program shall start with LGUs with Smoke- Free ordinance and with existing demand and/or program for tobacco cessation. There is a need to strengthen the smoking cessation infrastructure and referral system for providing smoking cessation and tobacco dependence treatment strategy, especially among LGUs. Opportunities to integrate these smoking cessation guidelines into relevant health and other programs (i.e., cancer control programs, maternal and child health programs, TB control programs, as well as poverty alleviation programs, workplace wellness programs, social welfare programs) should be explored and utilized. Performance Indicators: • Policy for treatment and referral for tobacco dependence treatment and related services • No. of functional smoking cessation clinics • No. of TB DOTS facilities with integrated smoking cessation services 3.5.3 Ensure financing for treatment of tobacco dependence under PhilHealth48 Cessation services are not covered under current health insurance schemes. Outside of Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) Circular 17, which provides for cessation counseling for overseas Filipino workers and family members, there is no insurance coverage for cessation services in the Philippines.
  • 46. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 41 RA 9211 mandates PhilHealth to cover outpatient cessation counseling for minors, but this remains unimplemented. Moreover, neither nicotine replacement therapies nor non-nicotine based cessation drugs are included in the national formulary (a pre-requisite for PhilHealth coverage). This presents a significant financial barrier for smokers who want to quit, many of whom belong to the lower socio-economic classes and rely on PhilHealth to cover the costs of preventive health care. PhilHealth maintains that it is waiting for the DOH to officially issue cessation clinical practice guidelines before it can establish the coverage rules for cessation services. At present, private health insurance companies do not include cessation in their list of covered services. PhilHealth should expand the insurance coverage to cover a package of evidence-based essential cessation services that includes brief advice at the primary health care level, access to intensive counseling such as through a national quit line and, to the extent possible, pharmacotherapy for those who are heavily addicted to tobacco. Performance Indicators: • Financing scheme on the treatment of tobacco dependence developed and implemented • No. of smokers who availed of the benefit • No. of facilities that availed of the benefit
  • 47. 42 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AdBoard Advertising Board of the Philippines AER Action for Economic Reforms AFP Armed Forces of the Philippines AFTPTC ASEAN Focal Points on Tobacco Control AO Administrative Order ASEAN Association of Southeast Asian Nations ATBP Anti Tobacco Behavior Program BAT British American Tobacco BIR Bureau of Internal Revenue BOC Bureau of Customs CHDMM Center for Health Development Metro Manila CHED Commission on Higher Education CAD Coronary Artery Disease COPD Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease CPG Clinical Practice Guidelines CSC Civil Service Commission CVD Cardiovascular Diseases DA Department of Agriculture DAP Development Academy of the Philippines DECS Department of Education, Culture and Sports DENR Department of Environment and Natural Resources DepEd Department of Education DDB Dangerous Drugs Board DILG Department of Interior and Local Government DLSU De La Salle University DO Department Order DOF Department of Finance DOH Department of Health DOH BLHD Department of Health Bureau of Local Health Development DOH BIHC Department of Health Bureau of International Health Cooperation DOHHHRDB Department of Health Health Human Resource Development Bureau DOH HPDPB Department of Health Health Policy Development and Planning Bureau DOHNCHP Department of Health National Center for Health Promotion
  • 48. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 43 DOHN-CDPC Department of Health National Center for Disease Prevention and Control DOJ Department of Justice DOLE Department of Labor and Employment DOST Department of Science and Technology DOTC-LTFRB Department of Transportation and Communication Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board DSWD Department of Social Welfare and Development DTI Department of Trade and Industry DTI-BTRCP Department of Trade and Industry – Bureau of Trade and Consumer Protection ESHUT Environmentally Sustainable Healthy Urban Transport FCAP Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Alliance, Philippines FDA Food and Drug Administration GATS Global Adult Tobacco Survey GYTS Global Youth Tobacco Survey GHI Graphic Health Information HJ Health Justice, Philippines HSO Health Service Office IACT Interagency Committee on Tobacco IEC Information, Education and Communication IPCAP Integrated Professional Counselors Association of the Philippines ITGA International Tobacco Growers' Association JMC Joint Memorandum Circular JTI Japan Tobacco International KBP Kapisanan Ng Mga Brodkaster Ng Pilipinas LCP Lung Center of the Philippines LGU Local Government Unit LTFRB Land Transportation Franchising & Regulatory Board MIAA Manila International Airport Authority MMDA Metro Manila Development Authority MTP Medium Term Plan NBI National Bureau of Investigation NCDPC National Center for Disease Prevention and Control NCAC National Consumer Affairs Council NCD Noncommunicable Diseases NCHP National Center for Health Promotion NGO NonGovernment Organization NTA National Tobacco Authority NTCCO National Tobacco Control Coordinating Office NTPCP National Tobacco Prevention and Control Program
  • 49. 44 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) - PHILIPPINES NTRC National Tax Research Center NYC National Youth Commission OSG Office of the Solicitor General OSHC Occupational Safety and Health Center PAP Psychological Association of the Philippines PCCP Philippine College of Chest Physicians PCG Philippine Coast Guard PCHRD Philippine Council for Health Research and Development PCP Philippine College of Physicians PCS Philippine Cancer Society PGH Philippine General Hospital PHIC Philippine Health Insurance Corporation/PhilHealth PIA Philippine Information Agency PLC Philippine Lung Center PLCPD Philippine Legislators' Committee on Population and Development PMI Philip Morris International PMFTC Philip Morris Fortune Tobacco Corporation PMA Philippine Medical Association PNP Philippine National Police PN Philippine Navy POS Point of Sale PSC Philippine Sports Commission PTGA Philippine Tobacco Growers’ Association R.A. Republic Act RAP Regional Action Plan SAMMEC Smoking Attributable Mortality and Economic Costs SDA Seventh Day Adventist SEATCA Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance SHS Secondhand Smoking SMIC South Manila InterInstitutional Consortium SWAT Sectorwide AntiTobacco TAPS Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship TCT Tobacco Control Team TESDA Technical Education and Skills Development Authority TWG Technical Working Group UHC Universal Health Care ULAP Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines UPCLDF University of the Philippines College of Law Development Foundation UPCPH University of the Philippines College of Public Health WHO World Health Organization WHO-FCTC World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control WPRO Western Pacific Regional Office
  • 50. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL TOBACCO CONTROL STRATEGY 45 GLOSSARY OF TERMS Behavioral support39 - refers to support, other than medications, aimed at helping people stop their tobacco use. It can include all cessation assistance that imparts knowledge about tobacco use and quitting; provides support and teaches skills and strategies for changing behavior. Brief advice40 - refers to advice to stop using tobacco; usually takes only a few minutes; and given to all tobacco users, usually during the course of a routine consultation or interaction. Contents41 - refers to constituents with respect to processed tobacco; and ingredients with respect to tobacco products. Design feature42 - a characteristic of the design of a tobacco product that has an immediate causal link with the testing and measuring of its contents and emissions. For example, ventilation holes around cigarette filters decrease machine-measured yields of nicotine by diluting mainstream smoke. Emissions43 - substances that are released when the tobacco product is used as intended. For example, in the case of cigarettes and other combusted products, emissions are the substances found in the smoke. In the case of smokeless tobacco products for oral use, emissions are the substances released during the process of chewing or sucking; in the case of nasal use, emissions refer to substances released by particles during the process of snuffing. Expanded tobacco44 - is tobacco that has been expanded in volume by quick volatilization of a medium such as dry ice. Framework Convention on Tobacco Control45 - is the first international treaty negotiated under the auspices of World Health Organization which represents a paradigm shift in developing a regulatory strategy to address addictive substances. In contrast to previous drug control treaties, the WHO-FCTC asserts the importance of demand reduction strategies as well as 39 WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Guidelines for Implementation (Article 5.3; Article 8; Articles 9 and 10; Article 11; Article 12; Article 13; and Article 14. 2011 edition;; p 114. 40 Ibid p. 114 41 Ibid p. 34 42 Ibid p. 35 43 Ibid p. 35 44 Ibid p. 35 45 World Health Organization. WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO Press: Geneva. 2005.

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