How do middle school
students read science on the
Web?
Meilan Zhang
NARST Presentation
Wide use of online resources in schools
 Teachers: 62.3% of teachers often used Web resources in their
lesson planning or...
Accessing
information
Having a learning
experience=?
Oversimplifyin
g task
Quick
skimming
Busy but not
learning
science
Di...
Software design: IdeaKeeper project
 Java-based scaffolded software
 Support middle school students in the full
range of...
Screenshot of IdeaKeeper -- Search
Search results
Keyword list
Inquiry goals
Notepad in “Skim”, “Read” and “Summarize” view
IdeaKeeper Notepad
Research Question
 How do middle school students read
information on the Web, and how does the
scaffolding mediate studen...
Context
 In a public middle school, a 9-week writer’s workshop
class:
 4.5 weeks for creative writing;
 Another 4.5 wee...
Participants
 8 pairs from two 6th
grade classes
IdeaKeeper group:
 4 pairs from one class, online inquiry supported by...
Data Sources
 Video recording: 4*9 + 4*11= 80 videos
 System log files: 36 log files (IK students only)
 Students’ arti...
Data analysis
 Viewed and transcribed all of the videos
 Developed analytic memos
 Coded into online inquiry events
Se...
Major findings
 Cursory
 Fragmented
 Opportunistic
 Deliberate
 Thorough
 Question oriented
Regular online reading G...
Finding 1
 Unguided online browsing is cursory
 Use of IdeaKeeper slows students down in
their reading.
Figure: Average time on skimming and reading per
site by two groups
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
Average time on skimming per ...
Finding 2
 In general, higher achievement students
read more thoroughly than lower
achievement students in both groups.
...
Table: Level of fragmented reading for each dyad
Website read by Dyad 7,
Non-IdeaKeeper group
Website read by Dyad 1, IdeaKeeper group
Finding 3
 Unguided online reading tends to be
opportunistic. Their attention drifts among
different elements of a websit...
Figure: Dyad 5’s attention flow in a site, Zeroing in on Ocean Dead Zones
Figure: Dyad 2’s attention flow in site, drinking water: hard water.
Discussion
 Online reading needs guidance.
Prompting is one of the strategies to guide
students’ reading on the Web.
 Pr...
Future research direction
 Support teachers’ work in online inquiry
 Explore other strategies to promote critical
thinki...
Narst_How students read on the web
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Narst_How students read on the web

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narst_How students read on the web

  • 1. How do middle school students read science on the Web? Meilan Zhang NARST Presentation
  • 2. Wide use of online resources in schools  Teachers: 62.3% of teachers often used Web resources in their lesson planning or classroom instruction. (EDC, 2005)  Students: 67% of students in grades 7-12 will do an Internet search for their schoolwork. (NetDay, 2004) Online search 67% Library 10% Ask teacher 9% Textbook 5% Other 9%
  • 3. Accessing information Having a learning experience=? Oversimplifyin g task Quick skimming Busy but not learning science Distraction on the Web
  • 4. Software design: IdeaKeeper project  Java-based scaffolded software  Support middle school students in the full range of online inquiry activities
  • 5. Screenshot of IdeaKeeper -- Search Search results Keyword list Inquiry goals
  • 6. Notepad in “Skim”, “Read” and “Summarize” view IdeaKeeper Notepad
  • 7. Research Question  How do middle school students read information on the Web, and how does the scaffolding mediate students’ online reading?
  • 8. Context  In a public middle school, a 9-week writer’s workshop class:  4.5 weeks for creative writing;  Another 4.5 weeks for scientific writing, which the study focused on  Questions students explored:  How does the acid rain affect the quality of our water?  Why are countries allowed to dump raw sewage in the ocean?  Why are water-borne diseases more prone to some places than others?  Can we filter our own waste into usable drinking water?
  • 9. Participants  8 pairs from two 6th grade classes IdeaKeeper group:  4 pairs from one class, online inquiry supported by IdeaKeeper Non-IdeaKeeper group:  4 pairs from another class, regular online inquiry without IdeaKeeper support
  • 10. Data Sources  Video recording: 4*9 + 4*11= 80 videos  System log files: 36 log files (IK students only)  Students’ artifacts: for 16 students  Classroom observational notes: for 20 class sessions
  • 11. Data analysis  Viewed and transcribed all of the videos  Developed analytic memos  Coded into online inquiry events Search, skim, read, browse, monitor, off-line task, off-task behavior, and teacher’s talk  Identified relevant occurrences and illustrating episodes for emerged findings
  • 12. Major findings  Cursory  Fragmented  Opportunistic  Deliberate  Thorough  Question oriented Regular online reading Guided online reading
  • 13. Finding 1  Unguided online browsing is cursory  Use of IdeaKeeper slows students down in their reading.
  • 14. Figure: Average time on skimming and reading per site by two groups 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Average time on skimming per site Average time on reading per site Minutes IK group No IK group
  • 15. Finding 2  In general, higher achievement students read more thoroughly than lower achievement students in both groups.  Use of IdeaKeeper notepad affects the way that students approach text. Their reading is often triggered by the prompts of IdeaKeeper Notepad.
  • 16. Table: Level of fragmented reading for each dyad
  • 17. Website read by Dyad 7, Non-IdeaKeeper group
  • 18. Website read by Dyad 1, IdeaKeeper group
  • 19. Finding 3  Unguided online reading tends to be opportunistic. Their attention drifts among different elements of a website.  IdeaKeeper students’ reading is guided by the prompts in notepad, which make their reading much less opportunistic.
  • 20. Figure: Dyad 5’s attention flow in a site, Zeroing in on Ocean Dead Zones
  • 21. Figure: Dyad 2’s attention flow in site, drinking water: hard water.
  • 22. Discussion  Online reading needs guidance. Prompting is one of the strategies to guide students’ reading on the Web.  Prompts guided online reading is more deliberate thorough purposeful
  • 23. Future research direction  Support teachers’ work in online inquiry  Explore other strategies to promote critical thinking and deep learning on the Web e.g., teacher modeling reading and note taking.