Nanotechnology:
Hip or Hype?
Alya Elhawary
Ashley Pietz
Overview
 History of Nanotechnology
 Introduction to Graphene and CNTs
 Nanotechnology Challenges
What is Nanotechnoloy
 Nanotechnology is science, engineering
and technology conducted at the
nanoscale. This includes th...
History – Pre-modern
 4th Century: The Lycurgus Cup (Rome)
is an example of dichroic glass;
colloidal gold and silver in ...
History - Modern Era
 1857: Michael Faraday discovered colloidal “ruby” gold,
demonstrating that nanostructured gold unde...
History - New Millennium
 1999–early 2000’s: Consumer products making use of
nanotechnology began appearing in the market...
Carbon Nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are
allotropes of carbon with a
cylindrical nanostructure.
Applications:
•Organic...
Graphene
Applications
•LCDs
•Water/Air Filtration
•Bio-sensing
•Clean Energy
Challenges
•Properties being both pliable and...
Steel Comparison
Material Thermodynamics Physics Chemistry Manufacturing
Health and
Safety
Steel Well Known
Well Known
and...
Challenges in
Commercialization
New
manufacturing
development
Consistency of
product
Quality of
product
Control of
nanopar...
Challenges-Health Concerns
“All things are poison and not without poison; only the dose
makes a thing not a poison” –Parac...
Where Is Nanotechnology
Going?
Source: Mazzola, Laura. "Commercializing Nanotechnology." Nature biotechnology 21.10 (2003)...
Public Perception
 Over 80% of Americans know little or nothing of
nanotechnology
 Will public view it like Nuclear Powe...
Future – Hip or Hype?
Contact Information
 Alya Elhawary
 alyaelhawary@gmail.com
 Ashley Pietz
 ashley.e.pietz@gmail.com
References
 Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanotechnol
ogy
 Center for Responsible Nanotechnology
http://www.crn...
Work Cited
1. Ajayan, Pulickel M., and Otto Z. Zhou. "Applications of Carbon
Nanotubes." Carbon Nanotubes.Springer, 2001. ...
Back Up
Steel Comparison in Numbers
Material
Young's Modulus
(Gpa)
Thermal
Conductivity
(@ 25C)
Electrical
Conductivity
(@ 20C)
De...
of 19

Nanotechnology: Hip or Hype?

Presented by: Alya Elhawary and Ashley Pietz
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nanotechnology: Hip or Hype?

  • 1. Nanotechnology: Hip or Hype? Alya Elhawary Ashley Pietz
  • 2. Overview  History of Nanotechnology  Introduction to Graphene and CNTs  Nanotechnology Challenges
  • 3. What is Nanotechnoloy  Nanotechnology is science, engineering and technology conducted at the nanoscale. This includes the manipulation of matter on an atomic and molecular scale.
  • 4. History – Pre-modern  4th Century: The Lycurgus Cup (Rome) is an example of dichroic glass; colloidal gold and silver in the glass allow it to look opaque green when lit from outside but translucent red when light shines through the inside.  13th-18th Centuries: “Damascus” saber blades contained carbon nanotubes and cementite nanowires—an ultrahigh-carbon steel formulation that gave them strength, resilience, the ability to hold a keen edge, and a visible moiré pattern in the steel that give the blades their name.
  • 5. History - Modern Era  1857: Michael Faraday discovered colloidal “ruby” gold, demonstrating that nanostructured gold under certain lighting conditions produces different-colored solutions.  1959: Richard Feynman of the California Institute of Technology gave what is considered to be the first lecture on technology and engineering at the atomic scale, "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" at an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech.  1981: Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer at IBM’s Zurich lab invented the scanning tunneling microscope.  1985: Rice University researchers Harold Kroto, Sean O’Brien, Robert Curl, and Richard Smalley discovered the Buckminsterfullerene (C60), more commonly known as the buckyball, which is a molecule resembling a soccerball in shape and composed entirely of carbon, as are graphite and diamond.  1991: Sumio Iijima of NEC is credited with discovering the carbon nanotube (CNT). CNTs, like buckyballs, are entirely composed of carbon, but in a tubular shape. They exhibit extraordinary properties in terms of strength, electrical and thermal conductivity, among others.  1999: Chad Mirkin at Northwestern University invented dip- pen nanolithography® (DPN®), leading to manufacturable, reproducible “writing” of electronic circuits as well as patterning of biomaterials for cell biology research, nanoencryption, and other applications.
  • 6. History - New Millennium  1999–early 2000’s: Consumer products making use of nanotechnology began appearing in the marketplace.  2003: Congress enacted the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act (P.L. 108-153). The act provided a statutory foundation for the NNI (National Nanotechnology Initiative), established programs, assigned agency responsibilities, authorized funding levels, and promoted research to address key issues.  2009–2010: Nadrian Seeman and colleagues at New York University created DNA-like robotic nanoscale assembly devices.  Process for creating 3D DNA structures using synthetic sequences of DNA crystals that can be programmed to self-assemble using “sticky ends” and placement in a set order and orientation.
  • 7. Carbon Nanotubes Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. Applications: •Organic polymers, paints, •LCDs •Nanoelectronics •Electromagnetic shielding • Energy storage •Biosensors Challenges: •Tuning in of Diameter, Length •Tuning in of purity ~ 60% other carbon forms •Methods such as filtration reduce Young’s Modulus – becomes similar to bulk material
  • 8. Graphene Applications •LCDs •Water/Air Filtration •Bio-sensing •Clean Energy Challenges •Properties being both pliable and brittle •Shrinks with increasing T •Melting point and order of phase transition unknown •High film resistivity of several hundred Ohms for 80% transparency (solar cell applications) Graphene is a one-atom thick layer of mineral graphite, arranged in a regular hexagonal pattern.
  • 9. Steel Comparison Material Thermodynamics Physics Chemistry Manufacturing Health and Safety Steel Well Known Well Known and Defined Well Known and Defined Well Known and can be manipulated Well Understood and Studied for decade Graphene Unknown Theoretical proofs only Theoretical Unknown Unknown Carbon Nanotubes (single wall) Unknown Theoretical proofs only Theoretical Unknown Unknown
  • 10. Challenges in Commercialization New manufacturing development Consistency of product Quality of product Control of nanoparticle coating and stable dispersion Understanding self-assembly High Purity Yields Bulk Characteristics Validation of models Source: Zhao, Qian Qiu, Arthur Boxman, and Uma Chowdhry. "Nanotechnology in the Chemical industry–opportunities and Challenges." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 5.5-6 (2003): 567-72. Web.
  • 11. Challenges-Health Concerns “All things are poison and not without poison; only the dose makes a thing not a poison” –Paracelsus (1493-1541) Source: Maynard, Andrew D. "Nanotechnology: Assessing the Risks." Nano Today 1.2 (2006): 22-33. Web.
  • 12. Where Is Nanotechnology Going? Source: Mazzola, Laura. "Commercializing Nanotechnology." Nature biotechnology 21.10 (2003): 1137-43. Web.
  • 13. Public Perception  Over 80% of Americans know little or nothing of nanotechnology  Will public view it like Nuclear Power, GMOs, or Stem Cells?  So far, public seem in favor of nanotechnology but may change with further integration to consumer products Source: Macoubrie, Jane. "Public Perceptions about Nanotechnology: Risks, Benefits and Trust." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 6.4 (2004): 395-405. Web
  • 14. Future – Hip or Hype?
  • 15. Contact Information  Alya Elhawary  alyaelhawary@gmail.com  Ashley Pietz  ashley.e.pietz@gmail.com
  • 16. References  Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanotechnol ogy  Center for Responsible Nanotechnology http://www.crnano.org/whatis.htm  National Nanotechnology Initiative http://nano.gov/
  • 17. Work Cited 1. Ajayan, Pulickel M., and Otto Z. Zhou. "Applications of Carbon Nanotubes." Carbon Nanotubes.Springer, 2001. 391-425. Web. 2. Baughman, Ray H., Anvar A. Zakhidov, and Walt A. de Heer. "Carbon Nanotubes--the Route Toward Applications." Science 297.5582 (2002): 787-92. Web. 3. Geim, Andre Konstantin. "Graphene: Status and Prospects." Science 324.5934 (2009): 1530-4. Web. 4. Macoubrie, Jane. "Public Perceptions about Nanotechnology: Risks, Benefits and Trust." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 6.4 (2004): 395-405. Web. 5. Maynard, Andrew D. "Nanotechnology: Assessing the Risks." Nano Today 1.2 (2006): 22-33. Web. 6. Mazzola, Laura. "Commercializing Nanotechnology." Nature biotechnology 21.10 (2003): 1137-43. Web. 7. Sun, Ya-Ping, et al. "Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes: Properties and Applications." Accounts of Chemical Research 35.12 (2002): 1096-104. Web. 8. Zhao, Qian Qiu, Arthur Boxman, and Uma Chowdhry. "Nanotechnology in the Chemical industry–opportunities and Challenges." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 5.5-6 (2003): 567-72. Web.
  • 18. Back Up
  • 19. Steel Comparison in Numbers Material Young's Modulus (Gpa) Thermal Conductivity (@ 25C) Electrical Conductivity (@ 20C) Density (g/cm3) Price per gram Common Uses Steel 200 43 6.99 x 10^6 7.85 $0.03 Major component in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, automobiles, machines, appliances, and weapons. Graphene 1000 5000 W/mK – 600 W/mK ? $100 to $100 0 LCDs, Clean Energy Devices, Water/Air filtration, Biosenors Carbon Nanotubes (single wall) >1000 2000-3000 W/mK 0.01 to 0.1 S/cm 19-56 x Steel $95 to $750 Organic polymers, paints, LCDs, Nanoelectronics, Electromagnetic shielding, Energy storage, Biosensors

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