Patterns of Racial &
Ethnic Relations
Professor Christine Monnier
What are patterns of racial & ethnic relations?
Regular ways in which the dominant group treats the subordinate group(s):
Population Transfer
PATTERNS OF RACIAL / ETHNIC RELATIONS
Population Transfer
Definition:
The dominant group expels the minority
group(s).
Involuntary / “Voluntary”
Involuntary:
 ...
Expulsion / Forced Removal
Trail of Tears (p.27 in the textbook),
Based on the Indian Removal Act of 1830
Expulsion / Deportation
Japanese internment (pp. 70 – 72 in the
textbook)
Expulsion / Ethnic Cleansing
Bosnia, 1992
Ethnic cleansing
Stage of genocide
Expulsion / Slave Trade
Expulsion is often a way to get the minority
group(s) “out of the way” or as a stage
towards exter...
Population Transfer
“Voluntary”
Refugees
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)
Stateless people
Forced Migration
Push factors
◦ Politics
◦ Economy
◦ Environment
Pull factors
◦ Politics
◦ Economy
◦ Proximity
◦ Culture
Refugees
1951 Convention Relating to the Status of
Refugees:
“The 1951 Convention protects refugees. It defines
a refugee ...
Refugees
13 millions in 2014
5.1 million registered refugees are looked after
in some 60 camps in the Middle East by Unite...
Internally-Displaced People
“As of the end of 2014, a record-breaking 38
million people were forcibly displaced within
the...
Stateless People
What are stateless people?
Based on the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of
Stateless Persons
“A pe...
Consequences of Population Transfer
Death
Undocumented status
Deprivation
Minority status
Prejudice
Discrimination
...
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Population transfer

Population transfer
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Population transfer

  • 1. Patterns of Racial & Ethnic Relations Professor Christine Monnier
  • 2. What are patterns of racial & ethnic relations? Regular ways in which the dominant group treats the subordinate group(s):
  • 3. Population Transfer PATTERNS OF RACIAL / ETHNIC RELATIONS
  • 4. Population Transfer Definition: The dominant group expels the minority group(s). Involuntary / “Voluntary” Involuntary:  Expulsion  Deportation  Forced removal  Forced migration  Ethnic cleansing
  • 5. Expulsion / Forced Removal Trail of Tears (p.27 in the textbook), Based on the Indian Removal Act of 1830
  • 6. Expulsion / Deportation Japanese internment (pp. 70 – 72 in the textbook)
  • 7. Expulsion / Ethnic Cleansing Bosnia, 1992 Ethnic cleansing Stage of genocide
  • 8. Expulsion / Slave Trade Expulsion is often a way to get the minority group(s) “out of the way” or as a stage towards extermination. But forced removal can also be done for the purpose of economic exploitation. Interactive animation Transatlantic slave trade database
  • 9. Population Transfer “Voluntary” Refugees Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) Stateless people
  • 10. Forced Migration Push factors ◦ Politics ◦ Economy ◦ Environment Pull factors ◦ Politics ◦ Economy ◦ Proximity ◦ Culture
  • 11. Refugees 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees: “The 1951 Convention protects refugees. It defines a refugee as a person who is outside his or her country of nationality or habitual residence; has a well-founded fear of being persecuted because of his or her race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion; and is unable or unwilling to avail him— or herself of the protection of that country, or to return there, for fear of persecution (see Article 1A(2)). People who fulfill this definition are entitled to the rights and bound by the duties contained in the 1951 Convention.”
  • 12. Refugees 13 millions in 2014 5.1 million registered refugees are looked after in some 60 camps in the Middle East by United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), which was set up in 1949 to care for displaced Palestinians. About half in Asia, 28% in Africa
  • 13. Internally-Displaced People “As of the end of 2014, a record-breaking 38 million people were forcibly displaced within their own country by violence, up from 33.3 million for 2013. A massive 11 million of these internally displaced people (IDPs) were newly uprooted during 2014, equal to 30,000 people a day, according to annual figures from the Norwegian Refugee Council's Geneva-based Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC).” Source
  • 14. Stateless People What are stateless people? Based on the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons “A person who is not considered as a national by any State under the operation of its law". This means that a stateless person is someone who does not have a nationality of any country. Some people are born stateless, while others become stateless over the course of their lives. Statelessness – not having a nationality – occurs because of discrimination against certain groups; redrawing of borders; and gaps in nationality laws. Currently, about 10 million people are stateless. Source
  • 15. Consequences of Population Transfer Death Undocumented status Deprivation Minority status Prejudice Discrimination Scapegoating