0
Extreme Space Weather and Aviation
Understanding the Issue, Evaluating the Risk 
and Planning for Events 
October 22, 20...
11
Extreme Space Weather and Aviation
 The Problem: What is Space Weather? What is our 
vulnerability?
 Effects on Key S...
22
The Big Picture
THE PROBLEM
33
Space Weather: What we need to know
 Space Storms: Produced by eruptions of turbulent and high energy plasma from the ...
44
Understanding Severity and Vulnerability
 Weather‐Like Variability: Sun activity generally occurs on 
11‐year cycles—w...
55
The Need for Resiliency: A Reminder from Chicago (Sept. 2014)
AVIATION IMPACTS
66
Context for Modern Aviation
Trends in aviation make Space Weather a dynamic challenge:
1. Polar Routes: Since the year ...
7
RADIATION BELTS
30+  Satellites
MAGNETOSPHERE
50+  SatellitesGeomagnetic
Storming
High Energy
Particles
MESOSPHERE
Scint...
88
We have knowledge but gap remains for extreme events (G5)
 Aviation is heavily dependent on advanced technology and hu...
99
Focus: Satellites and Space Weather
 Spacecraft generally resilient, but:
– A spacecraft insurance company estimates $...
1010
GPS’s use of high frequency waves can be disrupted in ionosphere
AVIATION IMPACTS
• A December 2006 solar radio
burst...
1111
MANAGING THROUGH AND MITIGATING SPACE WEATHER
1212
Summarizing Response Time and Effects
 Solar Radiation (X‐rays, Radio, EUV)
– Arrives in 8 minutes 
– Duration: 1‐2 ...
1313
NATO Coordination: Civilian
 International
– World Meteorological 
Organization (WMO)
– International Civil Aviation...
1414
Perspectives for Space Weather
1. Determine if Extreme Space Weather is Actionable: Widespread power 
blackouts, comm...
1515
Sources Consulted
 American Meteorological Society Policy Program and Solarmetrics (2007), “Integrating Space Weathe...
16
Stephen D. Van Beek, Ph.D.
Vice President
ICF International
9300 Lee Highway
Fairfax, VA 22031 USA
+1.703.934.3865
stev...
of 17

Solar Weather and Aviation

Briefed NATO Transportatin Experts on the Effects of Solar Weather on Aviation
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Science      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Solar Weather and Aviation

  • 1. 0 Extreme Space Weather and Aviation Understanding the Issue, Evaluating the Risk  and Planning for Events  October 22, 2014 NATO’s 2014 Civil Aviation Training Seminar Istanbul, Turkey Prepared for:
  • 2. 11 Extreme Space Weather and Aviation  The Problem: What is Space Weather? What is our  vulnerability?  Effects on Key Systems: Impacts on power, communications,  aviation  Aviation Impacts: Satellite and communications, avionics and ground systems, aircraft crew and passengers  Managing through and Mitigating Extreme Space Weather:  Response and coordination mechanisms  Implications for NATO’s Mission: Protocols and remaining  questions INTRODUCTION Prominence Eruption:  Solar Dynamics Observatory  (Oct. 2, 2014)
  • 3. 22 The Big Picture THE PROBLEM
  • 4. 33 Space Weather: What we need to know  Space Storms: Produced by eruptions of turbulent and high energy plasma from the sun,  referred to as coronal mass ejections (CME), that collide with the Earth’s magnetic field  extending into space.  Nearer to Earth, created too by instabilities in the Earth’s upper  atmosphere, generated by winds and special conditions near the equator.  Effects on the Earth: While the Earth’s magnetic field provides a partial shield, hazardous  space radiation and solar wind dynamics interact with the Earth’s environment and cause a  variety of effects to many of the advanced technology systems that guide our lives today.  Vulnerable Systems: – Power and Long‐Distance Pipelines: voltage control problems  impact grids, transformers, operations (false alarms). Effects  most pronounced above 50 degrees latitude, but connectivity  makes it a system issue – Satellites: degradation of signals, older satellites may age  prematurely or be rendered inoperable – Radio: HF radio interrupted by solar flares, radio navigation  disrupted THE PROBLEM CINDI satellite (NASA and  Air Force Laboratory) launched in  2008 to monitor the upper  atmosphere (60‐400 miles)
  • 5. 44 Understanding Severity and Vulnerability  Weather‐Like Variability: Sun activity generally occurs on  11‐year cycles—we are in the midst of “solar maximum,”  although activity heretofore less than expected, the cycle is  similar to the one under which “Carrington” took place.   Scales: Similar to hurricanes and tornados, scales devised  for the following (where 1 are minor and 5 are extreme impacts): – Geomagnetic Storms:  G1 – G5  (G5, 4 days per cycle) – Solar Radiation Storms:  S1 – S5  (S5, fewer than 1 day per cycle) – Radio Blackouts: R1 – R5  (R5, fewer than 1 day per cycle)  History: Science is less certain than meteorology, but science and understanding of solar  weather increasing.  – “Carrington” (1859): Telegraph operators in Europe, USA shocked, wires fried.  Lloyd’s of London  determined in 2008 that a similar event in the USA alone would cost $0.6 to $2.0 trillion. – Quebec (1989): Severe geomagnetic and solar radiation storm hit Earth, knocking out satellites and  communications for hours and took James Bay’s power network off‐line for minutes, leading to a nine‐ hour blackout. Since then, Quebec has invested over 1.2 billion (CAN) in capacitors to mitigate  charging—US regulators required mitigation measures. – Near “Miss” (2012): Carrington‐like event hit STEREO‐A spacecraft in orbit but missed a direct impact.   EFFECTS ON KEY SYSTEMS GOES‐7 satellite monitoring  Space Weather March 1989
  • 6. 55 The Need for Resiliency: A Reminder from Chicago (Sept. 2014) AVIATION IMPACTS
  • 7. 66 Context for Modern Aviation Trends in aviation make Space Weather a dynamic challenge: 1. Polar Routes: Since the year 2000, commercial airline traffic over the pole has increased  from a few hundred annual operations to more than 10,000 (2011) 2. Satellite Navigation: The ongoing shift from ground‐based to ubiquitous systems of  satellites for air navigation, while introducing great efficiencies into aviation, present  specific issues 3. Commercial Spaceflight: The increasing development of public and private spaceflight  present challenges to personnel, vehicles, and navigation. 4. Micro‐Technology: Increasing use of nanotechnology and electronic components  introduce vulnerabilities into satellites, avionics and ground‐based systems 5. Dependence on Power: Modern aviation is dependent on the provision of ground‐based  power for many important functions, including with airports and air navigation system  providers AVIATION IMPACTS
  • 8. 7 RADIATION BELTS 30+  Satellites MAGNETOSPHERE 50+  SatellitesGeomagnetic Storming High Energy Particles MESOSPHERE Scintillation Solar Radio Burst Electromagnetic Radiation STRATOSPHERE THERMOSPHERE 25+  Satellites S E A M L E S S E N V I R O N M E N T TROPOSPHERE A Map of the Atmospheric and Space Environment
  • 9. 88 We have knowledge but gap remains for extreme events (G5)  Aviation is heavily dependent on advanced technology and human operators, both of which  face challenges by Space Weather’s effects.  These include (but are not limited to): – Satellites and Communications: Many important communication satellites fly high, geosynchronous  orbits and are particularly susceptible to charging and to high‐energy particles penetrating the satellite  causing potential loss of signal tracking, degradation of orbit, and loss of service. – Avionics and Ground Systems: Ionizing particles are a threat to small components, including air and  ground  for increasingly used microelectronic devices. Upsets to Random Access Memory have been  documented to cause auto‐pilots and flight instruments to fail. International standards addressing  concern with avionics today; efforts ongoing. – Aircraft Crew and Passengers: Civilian aircraft  today are routinely rerouted (where sufficient  warnings are received), especially at higher  latitudes where radiation risk is more  acute. [Note: flights at polar altitudes  (>82nd North) face special communications  and crew health concerns] – Power Dependent Systems: ATC, airports and ground stations dependent on power systems  that may be susceptible to blackout. Focus on resiliency needed to maintain  independent service (e.g., micro‐grids) for remote and critical systems. AVIATION IMPACTS
  • 10. 99 Focus: Satellites and Space Weather  Spacecraft generally resilient, but: – A spacecraft insurance company estimates $500 million in insurance claims between 1994‐1999  – The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has analyzed over 300 satellite service anomalies  and found that at least one‐third are related to the effects of space weather  Impacts on Satellite Navigation: – Global Navigation Systems (GNSS): During a geomagnetic storm, satellite to ground radio waves  are upset and can introduce positioning errors of tens of meters. Satellite receivers can adjust   through a network of fixed ground‐based GPS transmitters. Solar Radio bursts may interfere  with GNSS as well by introducing background noise and degrading signals—duration of outages  may last tens of seconds to a few hours  – Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS): Severe geomagnetic storms (e.g., late 2003) can  disrupt Approach with Vertical Guidance (APV), which assists WAAS users with the ability to fly  approaches into airports.  Availability may be restricted for hours during extremely bad days  – System Capabilities: The mix of satellites by type, orbits, and day/night positioning make the  “system” resilient.  However, a series of storms could cause premature ageing and altitude loss  across a number of satellites, which could pose a threat to selective capabilities.  Given the long  lead time for replacement, this could be problematic for service recipients AVIATION IMPACTS
  • 11. 1010 GPS’s use of high frequency waves can be disrupted in ionosphere AVIATION IMPACTS • A December 2006 solar radio burst caused “profound impacts on  GPS performance, leading to  positioning errors and outages of over five minutes” (Carrano et al). • Two researchers posit that  Operation ANACONDA in  Afghanistan (2002) experienced radio communication failures  due to in part an equatorial plasma bubble—a relatively common  nightly occurrence during Equinox months. ‐http://news.agu.org/press‐release/space‐bubbles ‐may‐have‐aided‐enemy‐in‐fatal‐afghan‐battle/
  • 12. 1111 MANAGING THROUGH AND MITIGATING SPACE WEATHER
  • 13. 1212 Summarizing Response Time and Effects  Solar Radiation (X‐rays, Radio, EUV) – Arrives in 8 minutes  – Duration: 1‐2 days – Satellite communications interference – Radar interference – HF radio blackout – Geolocation errors – Satellite orbit decay  Energetic Particles – Arrives 15 minutes – Duration: hours to days – High altitude radiation hazards – Spacecraft damage – Satellite disorientation – False sensor readings – Degraded HF communications MANAGING THROUGH AND MITIGATING EXTREME SPACE WEATHER  Solar Plasma – Arrives 1‐3 days, duration days – Spacecraft charging and drag – Geolocation and tracking errors – Radar interference – Radio propagation anomalies – Power grid failures (Integrating Space Weather Observations & Forecasts into Aviation Operations)
  • 14. 1313 NATO Coordination: Civilian  International – World Meteorological  Organization (WMO) – International Civil Aviation  Organization (ICAO)  Governments: – FAA in conjunction with Office  of Science and Technology  Policy and National Weather  Service/SWPC – European Space Agency,  Space Situational Awareness  Programme   Military – Air Force Weather (Boulder, CO)  MANAGING THROUGH AND MITIGATING EXTREME SPACE WEATHER The U.S. and EU both maintain websites that report on space  weather conditions and their impacts:  http://www.swpc.noaa.gov http://www.spaceweather.eu
  • 15. 1414 Perspectives for Space Weather 1. Determine if Extreme Space Weather is Actionable: Widespread power  blackouts, communication outages and transportation limitations could cause  severe regional dislocation—possibly a trigger for NATO assistance  Likely to trigger NATO response only at most extreme levels 2. Evaluate the Effect of Space Weather on Existing NATO Missions: Ongoing  civilian and military missions may be affected by a space weather event— protocols likely to be similar for other impacted civilian and military operations.  Operational awareness of temporary dislocations in communications and  transportation can be made part of contingency planning 3. Keep Current on Research and Harmonization of Standards: As a “prestige issue”  there continue to be differences in standards for space weather information and  how operators should incorporate information in their planning and briefing  processes. ICAO, through Annex 3 (Metrological Services), is to “provide space  weather services to aviation in an internationally consistent way” and tasked the  International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group to work on consistent  approaches to the dissemination of information and CONOPS. IMPLICATIONS FOR NATO’S MISSION
  • 16. 1515 Sources Consulted  American Meteorological Society Policy Program and Solarmetrics (2007), “Integrating Space Weather  Observations & Forecasts into Aviation Operations: Report of a Policy Workshop,” The American  Meteorological Society, (http://www2.ametsoc.org/ams/assets/File/space_Wx_aviation_2007.pdf).   Boeing Aero Magazine 16 (2001), “Polar Routes,” Boeing,  (http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/aero_16/polar_story.html).   Carrano, C. S., C. T. Bridgewood and K. M. Groves (2014), “Impacts of the December 2006 Solar Radio Bursts on  GPS Operations,” Radio Sci., 44, RS0A25, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2008RS004071).  International Civil Aviation Organization and World Meteorological Organization (2014), “Space Weather  Services in Aviation,” MET/14‐WP/15, CAeM‐15/Doc. 15 16/4/14 (for more see): http://www.icao.int/Meetings/METDIV14/YellowCoverReport/MET.14.WP.064.2.en%20(Yellow).FINAL.pdf)  National Space Weather Council (2010), “The National Space Weather Program Strategic Plan,” National Space  Weather Council, Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research,  (http://www.ofcm.gov/nswp‐sp/fcm‐p30.htm).   Royal Academy of Engineering  Extreme Weather Study Group (2013), “Extreme space weather: impacts on  engineered systems and infrastructure,” Royal Academy of Engineering,  (http://www.raeng.org.uk/publications/reports/space‐weather‐full‐report).   Space Weather Prediction Center Topic Paper, (2014), “Satellites and Space Weather,” NOAA/Space Weather  Prediction Center, (http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/info/Satellites.html), accessed October 9, 2014. REFERENCES
  • 17. 16 Stephen D. Van Beek, Ph.D. Vice President ICF International 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 USA +1.703.934.3865 steve.vanbeek@icfi.com

Related Documents