Reporoa College
May 2014
The Narratives of Experience
The Narratives of Experience
Interviews-as-chat (2001) in five secondary schools
with:
• Non-engaged Māori students
• Enga...
Three discourse positions
(Outside the
school)
Māori students
& communities
(Within the
classroom)
Relationships
(Within t...
Where the discourses were positioned
Discourses explaining Māori achievement: Students,
Whānau, Principals and Teachers
0
...
Some new language
• Discourse
• Discursive positioning
• Deficit theorising
• Agentic positioning / agency
A definition of discourse
… a set of meanings, metaphors,
representations, images, stories, statements
that in some way to...
Discourses
First white
people to
arrive in
Australia
Settlers
Pommys
Traders
Colonisers
Convicts
White
ghosts
What was our discourse around
smoking in the 1960s?
… in the 1970s?
… in the 1980s?
… and the 1990s?
An example of discursive
repositioning
60s and 70s
• Sophisticated
• Socially acceptable
80s and 90s
• Developing an aware...
THINK, PAIR, SHARE
There may be a variety of different discourses surrounding a
particular event, person or group of peopl...
Deficit theorising
• Explanations that locate the problem in terms
of deficits
• Pathologising practices – ‘other’
• Alloc...
Agentic positioning and agency
In considering Academic Counselling
• Agency – agent of change
• Agentic positioning – meta...
“...we are all able to reposition ourselves from one discourse to
another because while we are partly the product of disco...
(Outside the
school)
Māori students
& communities
(Within the
school; outside
the classroom)
Relationships
(Within the
cla...
Māori
students &
communities
Structures Relationships
Reject deficit
thinking/theorising &
recognise their own agency
to e...
Reflecting on deficit theorising and
agentic positioning
What do you now understand
about:
–discursive positioning?
–defic...
Reflecting on deficit theorising and
agentic positioning
Thinking about Māori students and engaging
with Māori whanau what...
Just for a minute reflect on some
Māori student narratives
When you play up you get withdrawn from class. Yeah, you get sent out.
Sometimes it’s not your fault, but you don’t get a ...
Discourses to do with engaging Māori students
Don’t yell at kids. Don’t start thinking about what you are going to
teach u...
I think they need to try and understand us and the way that we
learn.
Treat them equally. Treat them the same as the other...
This afternoon
What makes a difference for Māori students’
participation and educational achievement?
We have begun to loo...
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Narratives and discursive positioning reporoa college pld may 2014

Exploring the place of narratives and discourse in teacher positioning in relation to Maori Students
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narratives and discursive positioning reporoa college pld may 2014

  • 1. Reporoa College May 2014 The Narratives of Experience
  • 2. The Narratives of Experience Interviews-as-chat (2001) in five secondary schools with: • Non-engaged Māori students • Engaged Māori students • Their whānau • Some of their teachers • Their principals
  • 3. Three discourse positions (Outside the school) Māori students & communities (Within the classroom) Relationships (Within the school; outside the classroom) Structures Analysis of unit ideas in the narratives identified that these teachers held three major discourse positions to explain Māori students’ educational achievement.
  • 4. Where the discourses were positioned Discourses explaining Māori achievement: Students, Whānau, Principals and Teachers 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Child Structure Relationship 9% 80% 11% 18% 63% 19% 22% 49% 29% 61% 20% 19% Percentage Student Whänau Principal Teachers
  • 5. Some new language • Discourse • Discursive positioning • Deficit theorising • Agentic positioning / agency
  • 6. A definition of discourse … a set of meanings, metaphors, representations, images, stories, statements that in some way together produce a particular version of events, a particular picture that is painted of an event, or a person or a group of people (Adapted from Burr, V. 1995. An introduction to social constructionism).
  • 7. Discourses First white people to arrive in Australia Settlers Pommys Traders Colonisers Convicts White ghosts
  • 8. What was our discourse around smoking in the 1960s?
  • 9. … in the 1970s?
  • 10. … in the 1980s?
  • 11. … and the 1990s?
  • 12. An example of discursive repositioning 60s and 70s • Sophisticated • Socially acceptable 80s and 90s • Developing an awareness of health risks Currently • Socially unacceptable. Explicit evidence of negative effects of life expectancy
  • 13. THINK, PAIR, SHARE There may be a variety of different discourses surrounding a particular event, person or group of people. Our thoughts, actions and our behaviour, including how we relate to, define, and interact with others are determined by our discursive positioning (the discourse within which we are metaphorically positioned). Consider the rate of attendance of Maori families at Parents Evenings. What discourses can you identify around this event?
  • 14. Deficit theorising • Explanations that locate the problem in terms of deficits • Pathologising practices – ‘other’ • Allocate blame • Abrogate responsibility to act
  • 15. Agentic positioning and agency In considering Academic Counselling • Agency – agent of change • Agentic positioning – metaphorically positioned within a discourse of agency • Accepting responsibility - ‘knowing and understanding how to bring about change and being professionally committed to doing so’ (The Effective Teaching Profile – We will look at this during Term 2).
  • 16. “...we are all able to reposition ourselves from one discourse to another because while we are partly the product of discourse, we have agency that allows us to change the way we see and make sense of the world by drawing from other discourses. We are free agents and we have agency; what is crucial to understand is that some of the discourses we draw from limit our power to activate our agency.” Burr as cited in Bishop, R. (2008, p. 56) ”GPILSEO : A Model for Sustainable Educational Reform,” New Zealand Journal of Education Studies, Vol.43, No. 2 Discursive repositioning
  • 17. (Outside the school) Māori students & communities (Within the school; outside the classroom) Relationships (Within the classroom) Structures Discourses to explain Māori students’ educational achievement Non agentic Deficit theorising AgenticNon agentic Deficit theorising
  • 18. Māori students & communities Structures Relationships Reject deficit thinking/theorising & recognise their own agency to effect change “I am able to effect change. I could …” Many teachers were discursively positioned here … Many look for the solutions here … and here is where real change can take place See Māori students and their communities in deficit terms “I can’t because the problem is …” See school structures and systems in deficit terms “I can’t because the problem is …” Discourses to explain Māori students’ educational achievement
  • 19. Reflecting on deficit theorising and agentic positioning What do you now understand about: –discursive positioning? –deficit theorising? –agency and agentic positioning?
  • 20. Reflecting on deficit theorising and agentic positioning Thinking about Māori students and engaging with Māori whanau what might be the implications for you: – as an individual? – as a member of staff at Reporoa College? – in your role as a Support Staff Member or Dean or Form Teacher?
  • 21. Just for a minute reflect on some Māori student narratives
  • 22. When you play up you get withdrawn from class. Yeah, you get sent out. Sometimes it’s not your fault, but you don’t get a chance to tell your side until you get to the deputy principal. So you tell your story and you are allowed back, but you’re shamed out. It’s stink. Some teachers pick on us Māori. Some teachers and kids are racist. Being Māori. They say bad things about us. We’re thick. We smell. Our uniforms are paru. They shame us in class. Put us down. Don’t even try to say our names properly. Say things about our whānau. They blame us for stealing when things go missing. Just ’cause we’re Māori. Discourses to do with being Māori
  • 23. Discourses to do with engaging Māori students Don’t yell at kids. Don’t start thinking about what you are going to teach us when we walk in the room. Get prepared. Have a smile on your face. Look pleased to see us. Treat us respectfully. Look like you want to be here. Say hi to us as we come in. Have a joke with us. Don’t bawl us out. If you don’t like something we’re doing, tell us quietly. Just ‘cause we’re a C class don’t expect us to be dumb. We might be there because we were naughty at Intermediate. Don’t have us writing all the time and being quiet. Let us talk quietly to each other about what we’re doing. We know we have to be quiet sometimes – like tests.
  • 24. I think they need to try and understand us and the way that we learn. Treat them equally. Treat them the same as the other students. They never even actually make an effort to understand our culture. They don’t try to understand where we are coming from. Make it easier for us to learn. Slow down sometimes ‘cause you don’t learn much when you go too fast. Cut down copying. We’d rather collaborate about the notes. You know, do them together so we can all understand.
  • 25. This afternoon What makes a difference for Māori students’ participation and educational achievement? We have begun to look at this. Our focus in our Professional Learning Morning and afterschool workshops will continue this work through Terms 2 & 3