INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
FUNCTION
A story beginning should introduce the reader to the
main character; the story sett...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
AN ACTION- Put the main character in the setting doing
something interestin...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
Instead of: This is a story about how I found a fairy in the woods.
AN ACTI...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
Additional Tips for Beginning Writers:
1. Avoid sending your main character...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
1. Story beginning are designed to grab the reader’s attention and make the ...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
AN ACTION- Put the main character in the setting doing something
interestin...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
AN ACTION- Put the main character in the setting doing something
interestin...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
DIALOGUE-Have the main charater say something that expresses a
feeling, cre...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
A THOUGHT/QUESTION- show what the main character is thinking or
worrying ab...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
A SOUND- A story-relevant sound effect or a description of a sound is a
gre...
SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS
Remind children that the beginning should be entertaining and
interesting a...
Narrativewriting d iamond
Narrativewriting d iamond
Narrativewriting d iamond
of 14

Narrativewriting d iamond

powerpoint
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narrativewriting d iamond

  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS FUNCTION A story beginning should introduce the reader to the main character; the story setting, the purpose for the story action. Most importantly, the beginning should capture the reader’s interest and hook the reader into reading on. In other words, the story should begin as close to the main event as possible. For example, if the main event in a story takes place at the beach, don’t begin the story at home waking up-begin at the beach.
  • 2. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS AN ACTION- Put the main character in the setting doing something interesting and relevant. (author ask himself) What would you do? DIALOGUE-Have the main charater say something that expresses a feeling, creates worry, or raises the reader’s interest or curiosity. It could be an EXCLAMATION. (author ask himself) What would you say or exclaim? A THOUGHT/QUESTION- show what the main character is thinking or worrying about. (author ask himself) What would you be thinking, wondering, or worrying? A SOUND- A story-relevant sound effect or a description of a sound is a great attention getting technique. (author ask himself) What would you hear?
  • 3. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS Instead of: This is a story about how I found a fairy in the woods. AN ACTION- I walked along the shady forest path on a magical afternoon. (author ask himself) What would you do? DIALOGUE-”What a magical day for a walk in the woods!” I said. (author ask himself) What would you say or exclaim? A THOUGHT/QUESTION- Today seems sort of magical, I thought as I looked out into the forest. (author ask himself) What would you be thinking, wondering, or worrying? A SOUND- Zing! Woosh! I spun around and stared into the forest. What had made that peculiar sound? (author ask himself) What would you hear?
  • 4. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS Additional Tips for Beginning Writers: 1. Avoid sending your main character out into the story world with a number of friends. 2. It is not necessary to have your main character get up, get dressed, plan their day at the beginning of the story.
  • 5. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS 1. Story beginning are designed to grab the reader’s attention and make the reader want to read on. They introduce the main character, setting, and purpose for the story action. 2. Authors use the following techniques to begin stories in an entertaining way: ACTION, DIALOGUE/EXCLAMATION, THOUGHTS/FEELINGS, SOUNDS 3. There are a number of questions an author can ask in order to help generate an entertaining story beginning.
  • 6. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS AN ACTION- Put the main character in the setting doing something interesting and relevant. Ask: What would you do? Ex. Joey ram full steam ahead across the corral and jumped on the back of the wild stallion! DIALOGUE-Have the main charater say something that expresses a feeling, creates worry, or raises the reader’s interest or curiosity. It could be an EXCLAMATION. Ask: What would you say or exclaim? Ex. “I can’t wait to see the Grand Canyon!” I shouted. A THOUGHT/QUESTION- show what the main character is thinking or worrying about. Ask: What would you be thinking, wondering, or worrying? Ex. I wondered if we’d make it out alive. A SOUND- A story-relevant sound effect or a description of a sound is a great attention getting technique. Ask: What would you hear? Ex. BOOM! Jack flinched as the thunder and lighting rolled in over the hills.
  • 7. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS AN ACTION- Put the main character in the setting doing something interesting and relevant. Ask: What would you do? Ex. Joey ram full steam ahead across the corral and jumped on the back of the wild stallion! Leroy dropped down on his hands and knees and scrambled around, frantically trying to sift through the dirt that was piling up around the hole. ex. Haunted House My hands trembled as I opened the creaky old door of the deserted house. ex. Camping I swung my backpack over my shoulder and headed into the woods. It would be a great day for a campout! Notice that each example establishes the character, setting, and theme (haunted house /exploring) of the story.
  • 8. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS DIALOGUE-Have the main charater say something that expresses a feeling, creates worry, or raises the reader’s interest or curiosity. It could be an EXCLAMATION. Ask: What would you say or exclaim? Ex. “I can’t wait to see the Grand Canyon!” I shouted. “Anchor!” shouted Captain Stebbins through his speaking trumpet. “Drop anchor!” ex. Haunted House “Here goes nothing!” I said as I climbed through the window of the old haunted house. ex. Camping “This is the perfect spot to set up the tent”! I said, I cleared the forest floor and set to work. Notice that each example establishes the character, setting, and theme (haunted house /exploring) of the story.
  • 9. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS A THOUGHT/QUESTION- show what the main character is thinking or worrying about. Ask: What would you be thinking, wondering, or worrying? Ex. I wondered if we’d make it out alive. Dread lay on Gilly’s stomach like a dead fish on the beach. ex. Haunted House I hope this place isn’t really haunted, I thought, as I tiptoed inside. ex. Camping I hope I can find a spot to set up the tent, I thought, as I trudged deeper into the forest. Notice that each example establishes the character, setting, and theme (haunted house /exploring) of the story.
  • 10. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS A SOUND- A story-relevant sound effect or a description of a sound is a great attention getting technique. Ask: What would you hear? Ex. BOOM! Jack flinched as the thunder and lighting rolled in over the hills. ex. The wind began in the night. Arthur awoke to hear the tree branches scrapping against the window and the sound of sudden sheets of rain being pushed against the house. ex. As soon as the wheels rattled on cobbled streets, Jemmy felt an immense sense of relief. ex. Haunted House Boo! Hiss! I shuddered at the strange noises coming from the basement of the abandoned house. ex. Camping HOOO! HOOO! An owl swooped down toward me, complaining that I’d set up my tent in his part of the forest! Notice that each example establishes the character, setting, and theme (haunted house /exploring) of the story.
  • 11. SIMPLE TECHNIQUES INTRODUCTION TO BEGINNINGS Remind children that the beginning should be entertaining and interesting and that the story should begin as close to the main event as possible. As students work, offer assistance and encouragement, and read terrific student efforts out loud. A good technique involves reading the boring original and following it up with the revised version. It makes a strong statement about the power of revision! Display the finished “Before and After” versions where the children can read and compare!