Preventing Wandering in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease
Patients with Alzheimer’s exhibit many behaviors that are out of...
2. Use a medical or emergency call system – Medical and life alert devices and emergency
call systems can help the person ...
of 2

Preventing Wandering in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

http://www.wirelessnursecall.com/wander.html | The Alzheimer’s Association reports that six in 10 people with dementia will wander. The underlying causes of wandering include confusion and unmet needs, such as thirst and hunger. By taking certain precautions, caregivers can help prevent loved ones and patients from wandering. Our Integrated Patient Wandering System will prevent this from happening.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Business      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Preventing Wandering in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

  • 1. Preventing Wandering in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease Patients with Alzheimer’s exhibit many behaviors that are out of the ordinary, which often includes wandering. The Alzheimer’s Association reports that six in 10 people with dementia will wander1 . It often starts when a person decides to do something but then becomes confused or lost in the process. Wandering may also be a coping mechanism when a person with dementia or Alzheimer’s is experiencing stress, anxiety, restlessness, or agitation. Certain medications can cause confusion or disorientation that may lead to wandering, while not recognizing familiar places, people and objects can induce panic, leading a person to wander. It is counterproductive for caregivers and loved ones to get upset with or reprimand an Alzheimer’s or dementia patient who wanders. The best solution is prevention. Wandering is not a deliberate act of rebellion or nastiness, but rather a form of communication that something (e.g. hunger, thirst, boredom) needs to be addressed. Below, Systemstechnologies outlines actions caregivers can take to prevent wandering in individuals with Alzheimer’s and dementia. 1. Secure your home or facility- Even professional caregivers are unable to watch patients every moment of the day and night. To prevent wandering, it may be necessary to install new locks on doors and windows. In a home environment camouflaging doors and door knobs with curtains, for example, is also effective at preventing wandering. 2. Identify the time(s) of day the person is most likely to wander- Perhaps your loved one or patient is most prone to wandering shortly after rising in the morning or at sunset. Identify the times the person is most likely to wander and schedule activities during that time. 3. Ensure the person’s needs are met- If the person has everything they need, they’re less likely to wander. If a patient is hungry or thirsty, for example, he or she is more likely to go in search of a snack or beverage. 4. Keep car keys out of sight and reach- Driving is dangerous for those with cognitive impairments. A person with dementia or Alzheimer’s may forget where they were going and become confused, and their reflexes are generally not as sharp, presenting a hazard to themselves and other drivers. 5. Secure the yard/outside of the facility with fencing and a locked gate- While it may be expensive, installing a fence around the perimeter of the property with a locked gate can make an enormous difference in preventing wandering. After you’ve taken initial precautions, including securing your home or patient facility and installing fencing with locked gates around the property perimeter, there are additional safety precautions you can take in case the person wanders away. 1. Make sure person carries some sort of ID- A medical or general identification bracelet is ideal.
  • 2. 2. Use a medical or emergency call system – Medical and life alert devices and emergency call systems can help the person get in touch with help if he or she becomes lost, injured or otherwise endangered. 3. Sew labels into garments to identify the person- If the person is confused and can’t communicate who she is and where she lives, a label sewn into his or her garments can help police or other individuals get the person home safely. 4. Keep a recent photograph of the person- A recent photograph will help police or others identify the person should he or she become lost. Wandering is common among individuals with dementia or Alzheimer’s. By taking the appropriate precautions, caregivers can keep their loved ones or patients safe and secure. If a person does wander, the Alzheimer’s Association recommends searching the area for no more than 15 minutes and then alerting the police that a “vulnerable person” has gone missing. Company Bio Systemstechnologies aims to improve life safety in all healthcare and security situations by providing advanced systems and services for monitoring, detection and notification while also providing unparalleled customer service and support through constant dedication to improving the skills and environment of our professional engineering and support team. Building on its VISION platform, the company engineers and develops advanced wireless equipment manufactured and tested to the highest standards to enhance the safety and security of staff, caregivers, residents and patients alike through solutions focused on quality of life improvement. To learn more about Systemstechnologies, visit wirelessnursecall.com.

Related Documents