1 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
This document is based on the work and findings of...
2 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
Project Overview
The Network of Australasian Terti...
3 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
Educational Networks
Educational networks can be f...
4 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
Network Leadership
The principles below are findin...
5 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
Improving Networking Practices
The NATA’s partner ...
6 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
Good Practice and Dissemination
One of the key ele...
7 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA)
Links and Resources
Good Practice Report Title eRe...
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NATA Digital Brochure 2015

A digital brochure highlighting the NATA project and the key outcomes it delivered.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NATA Digital Brochure 2015

  • 1. 1 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) This document is based on the work and findings of the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA), an Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching project. www.nataonthenet.blogspot.com.au http://www.olt.gov.au/project-national-networking-initiative-2011 Connecting and Collaborating: Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) – Authors: Mike Keppell, Gordon Suddaby and Natasha Hard Leading Educational Networks in Australasian Tertiary Education
  • 2. 2 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) Project Overview The Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) was established in August 2011 as a collaborative network between established higher education associations. The NATA sought to improve the engagement of members of its partner associations through a focus on network leadership. The NATA was comprised of a number of partners including: • The Australasian Council on Open, Distance and E-Learning (ACODE), • Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ascilite), • Council of Australian Directors of Academic Development (CADAD), • Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA), • Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia (ODLAA), • Australia’s Academic and Research Network (AARNet), • NetSpot, and the • Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT). The NATA formed a unique entity as it brought together these kindred associations to explore issues of common concern. The NATA drew upon and shared their collective experiences within the field of tertiary education. Further information about the NATA can be found on the NATA website. This resource looks specifically at how the work of the NATA relates to academic associations and educational networks. Understanding educational networks, network leadership, improving networking practices and the role of dissemination are discussed. Please note: All hyperlinks within this document are listed in full on the final page. Authors Professor Mike Keppell (NATA Co-Leader) Mike is the Executive Director of the Australian Digital Futures Institute (ADFI) at the University of Southern Queensland as well as the Director of the Digital Futures Collaborative Research Network (DF-CRN)  – a research partnership with the Australian National University (ANU) and University of South Australia (UniSA). Mike is a life member of ascilite and has a long professional history in higher education in Australia, Canada and Hong Kong. Current foci include digital futures, personalised learning, learning spaces, blended learning and network leadership. Mr Gordon Suddaby (NATA Co-Leader) Gordon currently works as a higher education Consultant on a number of funded projects in higher education in Australasia. For ten years he was the Director of Massey University’s Centre for Academic Development and eLearning (CADeL) before becoming Associate Professor: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning with the National Centre for Teaching and Learning, a position he held until his recent retirement. Gordon has extensive experience with ACODE, HERDSA New Zealand and DEANZ. Ms Natasha Hard (NATA Project Manager) Natasha is a Project Manager and Research Assistant at the University of Southern Queensland’s Australian Digital Futures Institute (ADFI). Natasha previously worked with the Flexible Learning Institute at Charles Sturt University where she worked on two DEHub funded research projects. Natasha co-authored an ALTC Good Practice Report with Mike Keppell and Gordon Suddaby on Technology-Enhanced Learning and Teaching during this time.
  • 3. 3 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) Educational Networks Educational networks can be formal or informal and can come in many forms with many foci. The NATA, as a network of networks, was primarily comprised of academic associations – a formal type of educational network with either individual or institutional memberships. Academic associations offer value to the Australasian tertiary sector by strengthening existing connections between institutions, supporting collegial sharing, providing structures that support the dissemination of specific educational material and fostering new connections across disciplines and institutional boundaries. Networks offer many different roles for individuals to take up. Individuals may join as general members to expand their own networks and engage in professional development. Individuals may also take on the role of representing their institution in networks with institution-based memberships. Members may also decide to nominate for a position on the executive or leadership committee or even put themselves forward to lead the network. Despite some differences between types of networks, many characteristics, issues and benefits common to academic associations and the experiences of NATA have application in the vast majority of educational networks. Some key questions regarding educational networks are explored here. Why join an educational network or academic association? 1. Build connections and professional networks beyond your institution and immediate colleagues. 2. Gain access to regular and structured opportunities for professional development such as conferences, webinars or structured workshops. 3. To keep up to date with current news, policy trends, publications and other developments specific to your discipline or interest. 4. Leadership development and experience opportunities. 5. To contribute to the wider educational environment and discourse. What types of educational networks and associations are available? • Academic Associations: Groups of academics and educators with a common focus and formal structure. For example, ACODE, ascilite, CADAD, HERDSA, ODLAA. • Professional Associations: Normally non-profit organisations focused on a particular profession and may include accreditation. For example, CPA Australia. • National Networks: For example, the OLT has supported four networks that have a national focus to their specific functions. See the OLT website for further details. • Discipline Networks: Including sixteen discipline-based networks supported by the OLT. See the OLT website for further details. • State Based Networks: For example, five OLT supported state-based networks focused on Promoting Excellence (grants, awards). See OLT website for further details. Why become a network or association leader? 1. To establish higher level connections and gain access to knowledge and experience that can then benefit your local context. 2. Be more informed about sectoral changes, challenges and opportunities. 3. To more effectively pursue and support professional values or key causes. 4. Use your skills and experience to contribute back to the sector – ‘taking your turn’.
  • 4. 4 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) Network Leadership The principles below are findings from a research project conducted by the NATA titled An investigation into network leadership within established Australasian tertiary education associations. Data was collected through interviews with leaders of ACODE, ascilite, CADAD, HERDSA and ODLAA and through focus groups with members of each executive. Transcript data was thematically analysed with the view to developing principles for good practice in network leadership. These principles focus primarily on academic associations due to the scope of the study; however, they have general applicability to a wider range of educational networks. 10 Principles for Good Practice in Network Leadership 1. Network leaders need to have strong personal networks to help inform/contextualise network practices and assist network dissemination. 2. Leaders need to have a focus on and clear understanding of the priorities and challenges for their association now and into the future. 3. The leaders of networks need to be cognisant of the needs and interests of their members so that activities and communication are relevant and offer value. 4. Network leaders need to understand the capacity of executive members and have realistic expectations regarding workloads and timeframes given the volunteer nature of their involvement. 5. Executive members need to have clearly defined roles and responsibilities in order to foster ownership and provide a specific focus to their association-based activities. 6. The development of rapport between executive members is critical for effective functioning: face-to-face interaction can assist the establishment of working relationships, which can be strengthened through the use of communication technologies. 7. Systems need to be in place to ensure that association knowledge and experience are maintained, whilst new and innovative ideas are supported. 8. Networks require a culture of vibrancy and transparency if they are to be sustainable and maintain a healthy and engaged membership. 9. Communication needs to be fit for purpose both in mode and message: consistency and the appropriate use of technology can support a sense of connection and the development of a community of trust. 10. Establishing financial security enables strategic allocation of funds for activities aligned with association priorities. Keppell, M., Suddaby, G., Hard, N. (2014). A network of networks: supporting good practice in network leadership and the dissemination of good practice in tertiary education. Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. http://www.olt.gov.au/project-national-networking-initiative-2011
  • 5. 5 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) Improving Networking Practices The NATA’s partner associations conducted a range of projects that addressed issues and/or practices related to member engagement, communication and leadership. These projects delivered value to their own networks and members, whilst also offering general value to all NATA partners and those involved in educational networks more broadly. These projects are briefly documented here; additional information can be found on the NATA website under Partner Projects. Australasian Council on Open, Distance and E-Learning (ACODE) Engaging Network Members: A NATA case study of a Contemporary Tertiary Sector Issue ACODE sought to develop and document a successful process for effectively profiling important issues relating to their members through a case study. • Wiki for Institutional Digital Video Management. Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ascilite) ascilite is developing a research-informed guide that reflects upon the use of social networks for developing online communities of practice and supporting professional networking. Council of Australian Directors of Academic Development (CADAD) Social Media as a Communication Strategy CADAD developed an online professional development toolkit to support and inform members about the use and affordances of social media • Online Social Media Toolkit. Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) Leading Academic Networks HERDSA explored network leadership offering practical guidance to both networks and their leaders as to how to step into leadership roles with confidence. • Tips for leading academic networks. • The HERDSA Guide ‘Leading Academic Networks’ (2014). Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia (ODLAA) Ubiquity Online ODLAA explored good practice in web presence branding and digital communication in a review of literature before applying the findings in a case study of ODLAA’s digital presence.
  • 6. 6 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) Good Practice and Dissemination One of the key elements of networks is their capacity to assist in dissemination. As noted by the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT), the national, discipline and state-based networks were funded “to support the dissemination of grant project outcomes and embed good practice in learning and teaching in higher education” (OLT website). As a national network, the NATA had a critical role in supporting the dissemination of a series of Good Practice Reports (GPRs), which summarise Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) and OLT funded projects. The 12 reports were developed to maximise the engagement of educators with the lessons and resources developed from learning and teaching projects. NATA adopted a range of techniques based on its access to partner networks and online and social media presence to assist in the dissemination of the GPRs. One of the key ways in which dissemination was supported was through the development of eResources that summarised the reports and presented the findings in a more engaging format. eResources The eResources can be accessed on the NATA website along with a list of completed GPRs. Technology-enhanced learning and teaching Professor Mike Keppell, Mr Gordon Suddaby Ms Natasha Hard This GPR focuses on examining best practice across 25 complete projects (including 3 fellowships) and 8 ongoing projects (including 1 fellowship) on technology-enhanced learning and teaching. Click here to view this eResource or here to access the GPR. Student transition in higher education Professor Trevor Gale Dr Stephen Parker This GPR reviews 19 completed projects (14) and fellowships (5) funded by the ALTC between 2006 and 2010, and identified as contributing to an understanding of student transition into higher education. Click here to view this eResource or here to access the GPR. Work integrated learning Professor Janice Orrell The ALTC commissioned this report to identify good practices in work-integrated learning in Australia through a systematic review of 28 funded studies. Click here to view this eResource or here to access the GPR. Curriculum renewal Dr Bhuva Narayan Professor Sylvia Edwards This report serves as an overview of the work funded by the ALTC in the area of curriculum renewal in higher education based on 40 completed projects and 7 fellowships and also makes recommendations for future work in the area. Click here to view this eResource or here to access the GPR. Innovative Indigenous teaching and learning Professor Nereda White, Dr Jack Frawley Ms Dang Thi Kim Anh This report has reviewed 16 ALTC funded and completed projects and fellowships as at March 2013 that are relevant to the topic of innovative Indigenous learning and teaching. Click here to view this eResource or here to access the GPR.
  • 7. 7 Lessons from the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) Links and Resources Good Practice Report Title eResource Link Good Practice Report Link Technology-enhanced learning and teaching http://youtu.be/3BKz0AZxwB8 http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-good-practice-report- technology-enhanced-learning-and-teaching-2011 Student transition into higher education http://youtu.be/ckFAvbmgMYw http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-student-transition- higher-ed-deakin-2011 Work integrated learning http://youtu.be/fN6wDgnTOlE http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-work-integrated- learning-2011 Curriculum renewal http://youtu.be/3Uu6tuY82eU http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-curriculum- renewal-2011 Innovative indigenous teaching and learning http://youtu.be/GpJjX7QzUiA http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-good-practice-report- innovative-indigenous-teaching-and-learning-2013 All Good Practice Reports can be accessed on the OLT Website at the following web address: http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-library/ good-practice-reports Organisation Resource Web Link ACODE Wiki for Institutional Digital Video Management http://www.acode.edu.au/mod/wiki/view.php?id=225 CADAD Online Social Media Toolkit https://sites.google.com/site/natacadadproject/ HERDSA Debowski, S. (2013). Tips for Leading Academic Networks http://www.slideshare.net/SheldaDebowski/tips-for-leading- academic-networks-deboswki-2013 HERDSA Debowski, S. (2014) Leading Academic Networks. Milperra, NSW: HERDSA. http://www.herdsa.org.au/?page_id=139 Acronym Partner Association Web Address AARNet Australia’s Academic and Research Network http://www.aarnet.edu.au/ ACODE Australasian Council on Open, Distance and e-Learning http://www.acode.edu.au/ ascilite Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education http://www.ascilite.org/ CADAD Council of Australian Directors of Academic Development http://www.cadad.edu.au/ HERDSA Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia http://www.herdsa.org.au/ NetSpot NetSpot http://www.netspot.com.au/ ODLAA Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia http://www.odlaa.org/ Other Links: • Australian Digital Futures Institute (ADFI) http://www.usq.edu.au/adfi • Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) http://www.olt.gov.au/ • CPA Australia http://www.cpaaustralia.com.au/ • Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) http://www.nataonthenet.blogspot.com.au/ http://www.olt.gov.au/project-national-networking-initiative-2011 • Massey University http://www.massey.ac.nz/ • OLT Discipline Based Networks http://www.olt.gov.au/discipline-based-networks • OLT National Networks http://www.olt.gov.au/networks/national-networks • OLT State Based Networks http://www.olt.gov.au/state-based-networks Acknowledgements The development of this resource was made possible by the support of the ALTC and the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. The views expressed in this resource do not necessarily reflect the views of the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. The authors would like to acknowledge the contributions of all partner associations for their involvement in the NATA as well as the Project evaluator, Tom Prebble and Jason Myatt with Media Services at the University of Southern Queensland. 14-1635