Connecting and Collaborating:
Leading Educational Networks in
Australasian Tertiary Education
Mike Keppell, Gordon Suddaby...
Connectivism (Siemens, 2006)
suggests that ‘knowledge is
in the network’
“Learning in a richly
networked society involves
...
Recent Publication
Carvalho, L. &
Goodyear, P. (Eds.).
2014. The architecture
of productive learning
networks. Routledge:
...
Networks in Higher
Education
Academic Associations:
Groups of academics and
educators with a common
focus and formal struc...
Networks in Higher
Education
National Networks: For example,
the OLT has supported four
networks that have a national focu...
Benefits of Being
Part of a Network
Building connections and professional networks
beyond your institution and immediate
c...
Benefits of Being Part
of a Network
Keeping up to date with
current news, policy
trends, publications and
other developmen...
The Network of Australasian
Tertiary Associations
Mission: To improve engagement
and practice through network
leadership.
8
NATA Origins
Closure of the ALTC
ACODE and ascilite
(Lead Associations)
OLT Networking
Projects
9
Network
Complexities
10
NATA Members
11
Principles of
Engagement
Collaborative
Advantage
Strategic Alignment &
Communication
Integrity
Sustainability
12
Academic Associations
What networks are you or have you
been a member of?
Why did you join?
13
Academic Associations
What were the membership benefits?
Challenges regarding engagement?
14
NATA Context
The diverse range of networks
involved in the NATA ensured that
the experiences and lessons are
relevant to a...
Research
Aims:
Improve the effectiveness of communication and
engagement with NATA members at large
Enable and support net...
Research Details
Interviews with leaders of networks
Focus groups with executive members
Findings:
Focused on practical ap...
To establish higher level connections and gain
access to knowledge and experience that can
then benefit your local context...
NATA Outputs: Leading Networks
Research informed principles and
strategies
Practical resources on networking and
network l...
10 Principles for
Network Leadership
1. Network leaders need to have strong
personal networks to help
inform/contextualise...
10 Principles for
Network Leadership
3. The leaders of networks need to be cognisant
of the needs and interests of their m...
5. Executive members need to have clearly
defined roles and responsibilities in order to
foster ownership and provide a sp...
7. Systems need to be in place to ensure that
association knowledge and experience
are maintained, whilst new and innovati...
9. Communication needs to be fit for purpose
both in mode and message: consistency and
the appropriate use of technology c...
Shelda’s Debowski
Presentation
Leading Academic Associations
25
Lessons for Optimising
Networks
26
It is important to take the time and work
with network partners to ensure that there
is a clear and shared vision for the
...
Establishing regular and appropriate
communication with key stakeholders is
essential. Relevant communication and
activity...
It is important not to underestimate the
importance of face-to-face meetings for
developing relationships.
Understand and ...
Questions
30
Sharing Best Practice among
Networks:
Learning from the experiences of other
networks
31
Partner Projects
ACODE ascilite CADAD HERDSA ODLAA
Engaging
Network
Members: A
NATA case
study of a
Contemporary
Tertiary ...
CADAD Social Media
Toolkit
Aim: To develop an online professional
development toolkit that will support
network members ca...
GPR on Technology-
Enhanced Learning and
Teaching (7093 views,
102 downloads)
Networks and dissemination
Networks for infl...
eResources
Technology
-enhanced
learning
and
teaching
Student
transition
in higher
education
Work
integrated
learning
Inno...
eResources
Technology-enhanced learning and teaching
Professor Mike Keppell, Mr Gordon Suddaby & Ms Natasha
Hard
36
Sustainability
Discussions on issues regarding
network sustainability
 Maintaining membership and engagement
 Communicat...
Resources
NATA Brochure
HERDSA Guide, “Leading Academic Networks” by
Shelda Debowski
Tips for leading academic networks. K...
http://www.nataonthenet.blogspot.com.au/
NATA Website
39
Summary
Strategies for making networks work
Networks & connections are increasingly important
Understanding different netw...
41
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NATA Seminar - Culminating Event for the NATA Project

The presentation from the final NATA event. For more info about the NATA see www.nataonthenet.blogspot.com
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NATA Seminar - Culminating Event for the NATA Project

  • 1. Connecting and Collaborating: Leading Educational Networks in Australasian Tertiary Education Mike Keppell, Gordon Suddaby & Natasha Hard 1
  • 2. Connectivism (Siemens, 2006) suggests that ‘knowledge is in the network’ “Learning in a richly networked society involves complex, shifting configurations of tasks, tools and people, with new distributions of activity across time, space and media (Caralho & Goodyear, 2014, p.xiv). Networks 2
  • 3. Recent Publication Carvalho, L. & Goodyear, P. (Eds.). 2014. The architecture of productive learning networks. Routledge: Taylor and Francis Group, New York. 3
  • 4. Networks in Higher Education Academic Associations: Groups of academics and educators with a common focus and formal structure. For example, ACODE, ascilite, CADAD, HERDSA, ODLAA. Professional Associations: Normally non-profit organisations focused on a particular profession and may include accreditation. For example, CPA Australia. 4
  • 5. Networks in Higher Education National Networks: For example, the OLT has supported four networks that have a national focus to their specific functions. See the OLT website for further details. Discipline Networks: Including sixteen discipline-based networks supported by the OLT. See the OLT website for further details. State Based Networks: For example, five OLT supported state- based networks focused on Promoting Excellence (grants, awards). See OLT website for further details. 5
  • 6. Benefits of Being Part of a Network Building connections and professional networks beyond your institution and immediate colleagues. Gaining access to regular and structured opportunities for professional development such as conferences, webinars or structured workshops. 6
  • 7. Benefits of Being Part of a Network Keeping up to date with current news, policy trends, publications and other developments specific to your discipline or interest. Leadership development and experience opportunities. Being able to contribute to the wider educational environment and discourse 7
  • 8. The Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations Mission: To improve engagement and practice through network leadership. 8
  • 9. NATA Origins Closure of the ALTC ACODE and ascilite (Lead Associations) OLT Networking Projects 9
  • 10. Network Complexities 10
  • 11. NATA Members 11
  • 12. Principles of Engagement Collaborative Advantage Strategic Alignment & Communication Integrity Sustainability 12
  • 13. Academic Associations What networks are you or have you been a member of? Why did you join? 13
  • 14. Academic Associations What were the membership benefits? Challenges regarding engagement? 14
  • 15. NATA Context The diverse range of networks involved in the NATA ensured that the experiences and lessons are relevant to a broad range of networks 15
  • 16. Research Aims: Improve the effectiveness of communication and engagement with NATA members at large Enable and support network leaders to encourage collaboration and increase membership engagement Review the utilisation of technologies to support best practice in network engagement Foster, encourage and support further network-based collaborative initiatives An investigation into network leadership within established Australasian tertiary education associations 16
  • 17. Research Details Interviews with leaders of networks Focus groups with executive members Findings: Focused on practical application 10 Principles for Good Practice in Network Leadership 17
  • 18. To establish higher level connections and gain access to knowledge and experience that can then benefit your local context. Be more informed about sectoral changes, challenges and opportunities. To more effectively pursue and support professional values or key causes. Use your skills and experience to contribute back to the sector – ‘taking your turn’. 18 Why Take on a Leadership Role in your Network?
  • 19. NATA Outputs: Leading Networks Research informed principles and strategies Practical resources on networking and network leadership 10 Principles HERDSA guide Partner Projects 19
  • 20. 10 Principles for Network Leadership 1. Network leaders need to have strong personal networks to help inform/contextualise network practices and assist network dissemination. 2. Leaders need to have a focus on and clear understanding of the priorities and challenges for their association now and into the future. 20
  • 21. 10 Principles for Network Leadership 3. The leaders of networks need to be cognisant of the needs and interests of their members so that activities and communication are relevant and offer value. 4. Network leaders need to understand the capacity of executive members and have realistic expectations regarding workloads and timeframes given the volunteer nature of their involvement. 21
  • 22. 5. Executive members need to have clearly defined roles and responsibilities in order to foster ownership and provide a specific focus to their association-based activities. 6. The development of rapport between executive members is critical for effective functioning: face-to-face interaction can assist the establishment of working relationships, which can be strengthened through the use of communication technologies. 22 10 Principles for Network Leadership
  • 23. 7. Systems need to be in place to ensure that association knowledge and experience are maintained, whilst new and innovative ideas are supported. 8. Networks require a culture of vibrancy and transparency if they are to be sustainable and maintain a healthy and engaged membership. 23 10 Principles for Network Leadership
  • 24. 9. Communication needs to be fit for purpose both in mode and message: consistency and the appropriate use of technology can support a sense of connection and the development of a community of trust. 10. Establishing financial security enables strategic allocation of funds for activities aligned with association priorities. 24 10 Principles for Network Leadership
  • 25. Shelda’s Debowski Presentation Leading Academic Associations 25
  • 26. Lessons for Optimising Networks 26
  • 27. It is important to take the time and work with network partners to ensure that there is a clear and shared vision for the network. The role of a critical friend is highly important as networks involve various parties, interests and tensions. 27
  • 28. Establishing regular and appropriate communication with key stakeholders is essential. Relevant communication and activity are vital for member engagement. An effective and current web presence is essential. Effective dissemination underpins the success of networks. Effective networks are based on collaboration and mutual value. 28
  • 29. It is important not to underestimate the importance of face-to-face meetings for developing relationships. Understand and account for partner differences and similarities. Succession planning is integral to maintaining continuity for network engagement. 29
  • 30. Questions 30
  • 31. Sharing Best Practice among Networks: Learning from the experiences of other networks 31
  • 32. Partner Projects ACODE ascilite CADAD HERDSA ODLAA Engaging Network Members: A NATA case study of a Contemporary Tertiary Sector Issue Guide to support and advance network engagement for members of professional associations and networks in the digital age. Social Media as a Communication Strategy Leading Academic Networks Ubiquity Online 32
  • 33. CADAD Social Media Toolkit Aim: To develop an online professional development toolkit that will support network members capability in the use and affordances of social media. Completed Outcomes: An online professional development tool kit for network members on how to engage with and incorporate a range of social media tools to enhance professional connectivity. https://sites.google.com/site/natacadadproject/home 33
  • 34. GPR on Technology- Enhanced Learning and Teaching (7093 views, 102 downloads) Networks and dissemination Networks for influence 34 Networks, Influence and Dissemination
  • 35. eResources Technology -enhanced learning and teaching Student transition in higher education Work integrated learning Innovative Indigenous teaching and learning Curriculum renewal Professor Mike Keppell, Mr Gordon Suddaby & Ms Natasha Hard Professor Trevor Gale & Dr Stephen Parker Professor Janice Orrell Professor Nereda White, Dr Jack Frawley & Ms Dang Thi Kim Anh Dr Bhuva Narayan & Professor Sylvia Edwards 35
  • 36. eResources Technology-enhanced learning and teaching Professor Mike Keppell, Mr Gordon Suddaby & Ms Natasha Hard 36
  • 37. Sustainability Discussions on issues regarding network sustainability  Maintaining membership and engagement  Communication  Funding  Relevance  Balancing workloads  ........ 37
  • 38. Resources NATA Brochure HERDSA Guide, “Leading Academic Networks” by Shelda Debowski Tips for leading academic networks. Key considerations across the life cycle of network leaders http://www.slideshare.net/SheldaDebowski/tips-for- leading-academic-networks-deboswki-2013 CADAD Social Media Toolkit https://sites.google.com/site/natacadadproject/hom e NATA Short Report 38
  • 39. http://www.nataonthenet.blogspot.com.au/ NATA Website 39
  • 40. Summary Strategies for making networks work Networks & connections are increasingly important Understanding different networks in HE Widely applicable lessons Sharing best practice among networks Understanding how to lead networks Taking on a leadership role in your network Practical resources on networking & network leadership Maximising influence within the sector. 40
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