Preventing and Responding
to Wandering and Bolting
Behaviors
This program utilizes materials with
permission from
The AWAARE Collaboration
Workshop Overview
 Introductions
 Background Information on Wandering and Bolting
 Why do kids with Autism Spectrum Dis...
Introductions
What is wandering?
Wandering is when a person who
requires some level of supervision to
be safe leaves a safe and supervi...
Potential Dangers:
Water
Traffic
Falls / Injuries
Extreme temperatures
Strangers
Background Information
 49% of kids with ASD engage in wandering and / or bolting behaviors.
 Drowning is the #1 danger ...
It is important to communicate with
your child’s pediatrician about
wandering and bolting behaviors.
 Rule out any potent...
Why People with ASD Wander?
 There are two types of behaviors related to
wandering, goal – directed wandering and non
– g...
Goal Directed Wandering
Goal directed wandering refers to leaving
a supervised area in order to pursue
something attracti...
Examples
 The child wants something
 The child wants to see something (sign, water, electronics, locks)
 The child rece...
Bolting or Fleeing
 Non – goal directed wandering is also referred to as bolting or
fleeing. This refers to suddenly runn...
Examples of Triggers
 Unexpected exposure to sensory overload (loud noises, camera
flashes, etc)
 Belief or fear that so...
People with ASD may engage in
one or both of wandering and
bolting behaviors.
PREVENTION
Always know who is responsible for
your child.
Figure out WHEN, WHERE, AND WHY
At every step along the way in the
PREVENTION process, think WHY,
WHERE, HOW, WHEN, WHAT, AND
WITH WHOM?
Step #1: Secure Your Home
 Visual reminders, such as stop signs on doors and windows
 Double sided key lock deadbolts, h...
Step #2: Ensure Your Child Can Be
Located and Identified
Can your child provide personally
identifying information? Will ...
Examples:
 Medical Alert
 Wearable Tattoo
 Whose Shoe? ID or Shoe Sticker
 Child Locator Alarm
 Wallet Cards
 Eye – ...
Safety Note
 Many tracking devices do not work when they are submerged in
water. Radio frequency trackers and some of the...
Service Dogs
 Some families have been very pleased with service dogs that are
trained to prevent their child from wanderi...
Step #3: Make schools, camps, and
other programs secure.
 Put safety concerns about wandering / bolting
into your child’s...
Adding concerns to the IEP
 Put your request in writing.
 Describe your child’s situation with detail.
 Obtain medical ...
If you do not believe that your child is
safe in a given location, then do not
leave your child in that location until
you...
If your child engages in wandering or
bolting behaviors, it is a behavior deserving
of focused attention by a team of
prof...
The focus of the team should be
both safety and education.
 Devise a plan for monitoring the child and ensuring safety
 ...
Step #4: Create a Safety Plan
Determine your response to bolting
and wandering in advance.
 Decide in advance how you will respond to your child should...
Step # 5: Alert Your Neighbors
 Informing your neighbors is often a difficult decision
 You need to decide what and how ...
Step # 6: Alert First Responders
 Providing first responders with important information before an
emergency occurs can im...
Step #7: Educate Your Child
 Helping your child learn to stay in a supervised area, regulate their
emotions, and practice...
Educational strategies for children:
* It is important to communicate with your child at their individual level
about bolt...
Practice Routines
 Stopping at doors.
 Stopping at curbs
 Keeping seatbelt on until adult gives a cue to remove.
 For ...
Use Social Stories FREQUENTLY
 Keep it simple
 Allow your child to assist in the creation as much as possible
 The stor...
Sample Social Stories
Read Social Stories OFTEN
 The largest mistakes made when using social stories is that social
stories are not read often ...
Teach Coping Skills
 Identify calming routines, places, people, or objects
 Ensure that some of these things are availab...
Teach a Plan B
 Your child or teen needs to know what to do in the event that they
have already wandered or bolted.
 Com...
Teach About Community Helpers
 Community helper identification is a start, but it is nowhere near
enough.
Who are they?
W...
Teach About Strangers
 Strangers represent a danger to children who have wandered and
bolted, especially to children who ...
If it is age and situation
appropriate, teach about public
transportation .
After bolting and wandering.
 Work with your team of professionals to create a
plan for addressing bolting and wandering ...
Teach Your Child to Swim
 Even good swimmers can get hurt or drown, but knowing how to
swim makes it more likely that a c...
Dealing with a Crisis
If your child is attracted to water,
search nearby water sources FIRST
After calling 911 . . .
 Enact your family emergency plan and begin searching the places
your child would most likely be ...
On the phone with 911 . . .
 Clearly state your child’s name
 Tell them that your child has autism. State that they are ...
Practice Prevention.
Be Safe.
Remain Alert.
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Preventing and responding to wandering and bolting behaviors 2

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Preventing and responding to wandering and bolting behaviors 2

  • 1. Preventing and Responding to Wandering and Bolting Behaviors
  • 2. This program utilizes materials with permission from The AWAARE Collaboration
  • 3. Workshop Overview  Introductions  Background Information on Wandering and Bolting  Why do kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders wander and bolt?  Prevention: Safety in the home environment  Working with schools, camps, and other programs  First Responders: Getting information to the front lines  Teaching My Child  In an emergency: Steps for dealing with a crisis situation  Creating a family plan for my child
  • 4. Introductions
  • 5. What is wandering? Wandering is when a person who requires some level of supervision to be safe leaves a safe and supervised place and exposes themselves to potential danger.
  • 6. Potential Dangers: Water Traffic Falls / Injuries Extreme temperatures Strangers
  • 7. Background Information  49% of kids with ASD engage in wandering and / or bolting behaviors.  Drowning is the #1 danger to kids 14 and under who wander / elope  Wandering behavior is rated as being the most stressful ASD – related behavior by the majority of parents whose children wander or bolt (58%)  40% of parents whose children wander or bolt report losing sleep over worrying / fear  The majority of families with children who wander or bolt report missing or purposefully abstaining from activities outside the home because of the behavior
  • 8. It is important to communicate with your child’s pediatrician about wandering and bolting behaviors.  Rule out any potential medical factors contributing to wandering  You pediatrician can add a diagnostic code for wandering to your child’s diagnosis of autism. - Insurance coverage - May be a helpful addition to a request for an Amber Alert - Underscores the need for separate consideration of bolting behavior in your child’s IEP
  • 9. Why People with ASD Wander?  There are two types of behaviors related to wandering, goal – directed wandering and non – goal directed wandering.
  • 10. Goal Directed Wandering Goal directed wandering refers to leaving a supervised area in order to pursue something attractive or obtain a desired item.
  • 11. Examples  The child wants something  The child wants to see something (sign, water, electronics, locks)  The child receives sensory input (song, TV, sparkling body of water)  The child sees something and is distracted by it  The child seeks out attention or stimulation at a time when adults caregivers are very busy (think school parties, recess tim at school, family gatherings, siblings’ homework time, etc)
  • 12. Bolting or Fleeing  Non – goal directed wandering is also referred to as bolting or fleeing. This refers to suddenly running or bolting, usually to quickly get away from something. Bolting is associated with the fight or flight response.
  • 13. Examples of Triggers  Unexpected exposure to sensory overload (loud noises, camera flashes, etc)  Belief or fear that something negative will occur  Something that is negative to the child that adults might not see right away (constant exposure to social settings, work, or other expectations at school, changes in temperature, rooms with echos, bullying or teasing by peers)
  • 14. People with ASD may engage in one or both of wandering and bolting behaviors.
  • 15. PREVENTION
  • 16. Always know who is responsible for your child.
  • 17. Figure out WHEN, WHERE, AND WHY
  • 18. At every step along the way in the PREVENTION process, think WHY, WHERE, HOW, WHEN, WHAT, AND WITH WHOM?
  • 19. Step #1: Secure Your Home  Visual reminders, such as stop signs on doors and windows  Double sided key lock deadbolts, hook and eye locks, and key pad exit locks  Home security system  Battery – operated window and door alarms  Window guards or protectors  Motion detectors  Baby monitors  Fenced in yard with child – proof latches
  • 20. Step #2: Ensure Your Child Can Be Located and Identified Can your child provide personally identifying information? Will they be willing to provide it to a stranger or a policeman? Will they approach a stranger? Will they run away from a community helper who asks them a question?
  • 21. Examples:  Medical Alert  Wearable Tattoo  Whose Shoe? ID or Shoe Sticker  Child Locator Alarm  Wallet Cards  Eye – Zon Personal GPS  Child tracking apps found in many phones and some games
  • 22. Safety Note  Many tracking devices do not work when they are submerged in water. Radio frequency trackers and some of the newer GPS trackers on the market have addressed this safety concern. This is one safety feature that varies by product and manufacturer. Do not assume that a device will work in water.
  • 23. Service Dogs  Some families have been very pleased with service dogs that are trained to prevent their child from wandering.  Some families have been extremely disappointed.
  • 24. Step #3: Make schools, camps, and other programs secure.  Put safety concerns about wandering / bolting into your child’s IEP  Visit program locations to look at the environment and physical structures and identify potential hazards  Review schedules and activities with staff. Discuss your safety concerns with them and work together to identify solutions.
  • 25. Adding concerns to the IEP  Put your request in writing.  Describe your child’s situation with detail.  Obtain medical documentation that your child wanders / bolts and is at risk.  Concerns for child safety should be directly written into the IEP.  Concerns should also be reflected in the Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)  A written plan for responding to wandering and bolting should be written into your child’s Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)  Your school should have copies of forms to provide to first responders
  • 26. If you do not believe that your child is safe in a given location, then do not leave your child in that location until your safety concerns are addressed. Communication with your child’s care providers is key.
  • 27. If your child engages in wandering or bolting behaviors, it is a behavior deserving of focused attention by a team of professionals. Parents Teachers and Principals BCBA Occupational Therapists Counselors Speech Therapists Doctors Physical Therapists
  • 28. The focus of the team should be both safety and education.  Devise a plan for monitoring the child and ensuring safety  Minimize or remove environmental triggers  Devise a plan for presenting children who bolt with alternatives to bolting  Devise strategies, and, if needed, objectives in a BIP or IEP to assist your child with remaining in a safe location
  • 29. Step #4: Create a Safety Plan
  • 30. Determine your response to bolting and wandering in advance.  Decide in advance how you will respond to your child should wandering or bolting behavior occur.  It is helpful to have an idea of the function of the behavior before determining what your response will be.  For kids who are bolting / fleeing / escaping from situations, consider that you want them to feel safe and comfortable reaching out to you or other people for help.  Even if your child tends to intentionally bolt while laughing, act in appropriately, or treat bolting like a game, consider that these might be signs of emotional dysregulation.
  • 31. Step # 5: Alert Your Neighbors  Informing your neighbors is often a difficult decision  You need to decide what and how much to tell neighbors  The National Autism Association advises filling out and distributing the “Neighbor Forms”
  • 32. Step # 6: Alert First Responders  Providing first responders with important information before an emergency occurs can improve response times and outcomes  Provide your local police department with a copy of your child’s first responder plan  Keep a copy of the first responder plan on hand at all times, to quick access in case of an emergency.  Your child’s school should also have a copy of the first responder plan in a convenient location.
  • 33. Step #7: Educate Your Child  Helping your child learn to stay in a supervised area, regulate their emotions, and practice healthy coping skills are all necessary parts of a solid prevention program.  Never rely solely on educational methods to keep your child safe. The child’s safety is the responsibility of parents and assigned caregivers.
  • 34. Educational strategies for children: * It is important to communicate with your child at their individual level about bolting. Never ignore bolting because it is a difficult topic. Take advantage of opportunities to discuss safety, and discuss safety often.
  • 35. Practice Routines  Stopping at doors.  Stopping at curbs  Keeping seatbelt on until adult gives a cue to remove.  For bolting, preteach and practice taking routes to safe places / people at home, school
  • 36. Use Social Stories FREQUENTLY  Keep it simple  Allow your child to assist in the creation as much as possible  The story should contain:  2-5 sentences describing the appropriate behavior in a social situation  1 sentence describing positive, observable appropriate responses  1 sentence describing the viewpoint of others as they react to the situation  1 sentence describing a commonly shared value or opinion  1 sentence that reminds the individual of the appropriate behavior in the social situation
  • 37. Sample Social Stories
  • 38. Read Social Stories OFTEN  The largest mistakes made when using social stories is that social stories are not read often enough or they are read after an undesirable behavior has occurred.  Social Stories are called an ANTECEDENT INTERVENTION. The best time to use Social Stories is BEFORE a child has engaged in wandering or bolting  Example: When going to a busy place, a parent reads a social story about staying near mom and dad to the child before getting out of the car.
  • 39. Teach Coping Skills  Identify calming routines, places, people, or objects  Ensure that some of these things are available wherever your child goes, or that your child has a plan or method of accessing calming stimuli  Use social stories, cartooning, and real and fictitious problem – solving scenarios to teach coping skills before problems occur  Help your child to successfully use practiced coping skills when possible  After situations are over and your child is calm, talk to him or her about how things went. Praise any efforts that your child makes to practice the targeted skill. Revise coping strategies as needed.
  • 40. Teach a Plan B  Your child or teen needs to know what to do in the event that they have already wandered or bolted.  Common strategies for helping kids with ASD navigate real world situations are social stories, child – drawn cartoon strips, and making lists of procedures. Work with your child to think about what they would do if they were out one day and got lost.  Avoid saying “if you bolt” or “if you run away”  Help your child brainstorm safe people, safe places, reasonable ways of identifying help or finding home.
  • 41. Teach About Community Helpers  Community helper identification is a start, but it is nowhere near enough. Who are they? What does their uniform look like? How can they help you? Where can you find them? Role play conversations, including approaching and initiating conversations.
  • 42. Teach About Strangers  Strangers represent a danger to children who have wandered and bolted, especially to children who have an impaired sense of danger or are overly friendly with others.
  • 43. If it is age and situation appropriate, teach about public transportation .
  • 44. After bolting and wandering.  Work with your team of professionals to create a plan for addressing bolting and wandering with your child after it occurs.  The response is situation specific and is linked to your child’s specific behavioral history and estimated reasons for wandering / bolting.
  • 45. Teach Your Child to Swim  Even good swimmers can get hurt or drown, but knowing how to swim makes it more likely that a child who falls into water will be able to get out.  When your child has learned how to swim, inquire about the possibility of completing a lesson with their clothing on.
  • 46. Dealing with a Crisis
  • 47. If your child is attracted to water, search nearby water sources FIRST
  • 48. After calling 911 . . .  Enact your family emergency plan and begin searching the places your child would most likely be attracted to  Contact your emergency point person so that they can help you fax your alert form to local law enforcement, contact your neighbors, and make arrangements to care for your other children
  • 49. On the phone with 911 . . .  Clearly state your child’s name  Tell them that your child has autism. State that they are endangered and that they have no sense of danger.  If your child has a radio frequency tracking number, provide it.  Provide your child’s date of birth, height, weight, and other unique identifiers  If your child is attracted to water, tell them to immediately dispatch personnel to nearby areas of water  Tell them when you noticed your child was missing and what clothing they were wearing  Request that an Amber Alert, Silver Alert, or Endangered Missing Advisory be issued  Request that your child’s name and identifying information immediately be entered into the National Crime Information Center’s Missing Person File
  • 50. Practice Prevention. Be Safe. Remain Alert.