POPE, C. C., & O'SULLIVAN, M.
(2003). DARWINISM IN THE GYM.
JOURNAL OF TEACHING IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 22, 311-327.
Ty...
Type of, purpose of study/paper,
theoretical framework/background
• Ethnographic qualitative study
– Descriptive study ...
Background and significance of
study…what did it report to add?
• Researchers are ‘tourists’ in the gym
– Unable to rec...
Setting of the Study
• Shady Woods high school free gym
– Urban high school in large American city
– One-hour free gym ...
Setting of the Study
• North side (4x) and Crosstown (2x) Recreation
Center
– 90-120 min observation
– Directly after ...
Analysis Methods
• Field notes from observations
– Microcassette recorder
– Small notebook
– Occasional interviews
• ...
Analysis Methods
• Peer Debriefing
– Respondents categories
• Descriptive review of contextual
characteristics
• Inte...
General Findings
• Similar social constructs observed at recreational
locations.
• Basketball was the only game played ...
Findings/Main arguments
• Student imposed hierarchy
– Determined play in free gym
– Mainly pick-up basketball games
– ...
Findings/Main arguments
• Jousters
– Small group of males
– Move around gym like ‘nomadic disturbances’
– Antagonized ...
Findings/Main arguments
• Hangers
– Even amount of males and females
– Used gym as social area
– Only watched games if...
Conclusions/implications for practice
and/or future research
• The author concludes that physical educators
– be aware ...
Conclusions
• “There needs to be a place where interesting
programs are available to those who seek health
and enjoymen...
Questions?
• How can we use this knowledge to decrease
the impact mis-education of sport in these
settings?
Personal Meaning
• Karl- Shows potential of using sport outside PE
for socialization and development. Also how
that be ...
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Pope and o'sullivan 2001 presentation

Pope and o'sullivan...social Darwinism
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pope and o'sullivan 2001 presentation

  • 1. POPE, C. C., & O'SULLIVAN, M. (2003). DARWINISM IN THE GYM. JOURNAL OF TEACHING IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 22, 311-327. Ty;ler Goad and Karl Zang
  • 2. Type of, purpose of study/paper, theoretical framework/background • Ethnographic qualitative study – Descriptive study looking at custom/practices • Attempt to understand how urban youth experience sport in a ‘free gym’ setting – During lunch hour and 2 rec centers • Ecological evolution through sport – modified version of Darwin's “survival of the fittest” theory
  • 3. Background and significance of study…what did it report to add? • Researchers are ‘tourists’ in the gym – Unable to recognize complexity of social interactions and structure • Long-term observation needed for true understanding – Extra curriculum learning from free gym experiences • Determine how urban youth shape social constructs – before/during/after school (recreational times)
  • 4. Setting of the Study • Shady Woods high school free gym – Urban high school in large American city – One-hour free gym during lunch – 65% free/subsidized lunch – 65% African American, 25% Caucasian, 3% Asian American • 90% of those who participate in activities are African American males. – 51% male 49% female – Study took place over 5 months
  • 5. Setting of the Study • North side (4x) and Crosstown (2x) Recreation Center – 90-120 min observation – Directly after school or in the evenings – 15-40 high school students
  • 6. Analysis Methods • Field notes from observations – Microcassette recorder – Small notebook – Occasional interviews • Log entries – Observational notes – Personal notes – Theoretical notes
  • 7. Analysis Methods • Peer Debriefing – Respondents categories • Descriptive review of contextual characteristics • Interpretation of data that supported the emergence of certain themes
  • 8. General Findings • Similar social constructs observed at recreational locations. • Basketball was the only game played • If environment was public, intense, or subject to peer scrutiny – Only students who played where the males who were highly skilled. – Participants where aggressive and boisterous – Possessed strong attributes in social skill or “street literacy”
  • 9. Findings/Main arguments • Student imposed hierarchy – Determined play in free gym – Mainly pick-up basketball games – 7 categories in lunch-hour gym, similar in rec centers • Bullies – Alphas of the gym – Male, skilled performers – Games filled with trash talk and slam dunks
  • 10. Findings/Main arguments • Jousters – Small group of males – Move around gym like ‘nomadic disturbances’ – Antagonized their way into games with disruptive behavior. • Posers – 10 males, seldom participated – Used public forum to showcase physique and strength – Pop their shirts off and wore jewelry • Benchies – 30-40; Usually males, some females – Waited to invited to play or watching classmates play – Played “catch a glance” game
  • 11. Findings/Main arguments • Hangers – Even amount of males and females – Used gym as social area – Only watched games if they were “good games” • Venerators – Female version of posers (grades 9-10) – Well Dressed – Worked in groups of 2-4 to get attention of players • Contestants – Skilled and competitive male performers – Took games seriously; 4v4 – Vocal on and off the court
  • 12. Conclusions/implications for practice and/or future research • The author concludes that physical educators – be aware that more than sport skills need to be addressed in class. – Educators need to acknowledge impact of street literacy – Take advantage of free gym time to use sport as an educational medium – Suggest that the sport education and social development models are options in promoting inclusive practices outside of the gymnasium in a sport environment.
  • 13. Conclusions • “There needs to be a place where interesting programs are available to those who seek health and enjoyment through sport. The challenge for teachers is to ascertain whether the suitability of participant experiences in certain sport forms is meeting the developmental and social needs of many young people. Any effort to enhance the wider sport culture should include paying credence to the experiences young people have with sport.” p. 325
  • 14. Questions? • How can we use this knowledge to decrease the impact mis-education of sport in these settings?
  • 15. Personal Meaning • Karl- Shows potential of using sport outside PE for socialization and development. Also how that be have negative aspects if not properly monitored. • Flash backs to elementary school – This is how most peer groups were formed.