NAD710 - Introduction to Networks Using Linux   Course Overview May 28, 2003 Professor Tom Mavroidis
Course Text <ul><li>TCP/IP Network Administration, 3rd Edition </li></ul><ul><li>By Craig Hunt Third Edition April 2002 ...
Introduction <ul><li>Never has there been such dramatic changes to the business world as we have seen in the 1990’s with e...
Architecture of the Internet <ul><li>Overview of the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide from : Computer Networks, Fourth Ed...
Ethernet <ul><li>Architecture of the original Ethernet. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide from : Computer Networks, Fourth Edition ...
Search Engines <ul><li>The role played by Internet has forced companies to get connected to stay relevant so they may comp...
Uses of Computer Networks <ul><ul><li>Business Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Home Applications </li></ul></ul><u...
How was the Internet Built? <ul><li>In the 60’s and 70’s there were many different networks, protocols and implementatio...
Historical Maps of ARPANET <ul><li>Paul Baran in the 1960s envisioned a communications network that would survive a majo...
A rough sketch map of the possible topology of ARPANET by Larry Roberts Dr. Lawrence Roberts led the team that designed an...
DARPA <ul><li>The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency funded the exploration of this common protocol. </li></ul><ul>...
Backbone Protocol <ul><li>TCP/IP became the backbone protocol of multivendor networks such as ARPANET, NFSNET and other re...
TCP/IP’s Objective <ul><li>On the battlefield a communications network that sustains damage should be robust enough to au...
A Suite is Born <ul><li>The protocol suite became popular when it was integrated into the University of California at Berk...
TCP/IP- Goodbye proprietary networks <ul><li>TCP/IP provides the ability to merge different physical networks using a com...
TCP/IP Layer Model <ul><li>When networks first came into being, computer could typically communicate only with computers f...
TCP/IP - The need for standards <ul><li>Gain an understanding of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the OSI and DOD Layer models </li...
RFC’s <ul><li>What are they? </li></ul><ul><li>The Requests for Comments (RFC) document series is a set of technical and o...
Planning for growth <ul><li>Selecting the right class for your network </li></ul><ul><li>What is CIDR routing </li></ul><u...
Subject Goals <ul><li>Gain an understanding of how Linux fits into today’s networked world </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the s...
Governing Agencies <ul><li>ICANN The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers </li></ul><ul><li>IANA Interne...
IEEE 802 Specification <ul><li>The IEEE is a non-profit, technical professional association of more than 377,000 indivi...
Gain an understanding of : <ul><li>Network Interfaces </li></ul><ul><li>IP Addresses </li></ul><ul><li>Address Resolution ...
You will learn the differences between: <ul><li>Mac address </li></ul><ul><li>IP address </li></ul><ul><li>Subnet masks </...
Learn Common Linux Network Commands <ul><li>ifconfig </li></ul><ul><li>netstat </li></ul><ul><li>ping </li></ul><ul><li...
Configuring Network Hardware <ul><li>Kernel Configuration </li></ul><ul><li>Linux network devices </li></ul><ul><li>Setup...
Configuring TCP/IP Networking <ul><li>Setting the Hostname </li></ul><ul><li>Assigning IP addresses statically </li></ul>...
ARP and RARP <ul><li>The address resolution protocol </li></ul><ul><li>How does a machine communicate within the subnet? <...
DNS <ul><li>Setting up name services (BINDx) </li></ul><ul><li>How does it resolve names to addresses and vice-versa </li...
Setting up a DNS Nameserver <ul><li>When you need a nameserver </li></ul><ul><li>Why you may prefer to use your ISP’s DN...
NFS Network File System <ul><li>Preparing NFS </li></ul><ul><li>Mounting an NFS volume </li></ul><ul><li>The NFS daemon...
Connecting Windows to Linux <ul><li>Samba is an Open Source / Free Software suite that provides seamless file and prin...
Bridges, Routers and Switches <ul><li>Which device should be used to address a specific design goal? </li></ul><ul><li>Wha...
Routing and Switching <ul><li>How does it differ? </li></ul><ul><li>What devices do we use to accomplish the task. </li></ul>
Routing Protocols <ul><li>How information is passed between routers </li></ul><ul><li>How they can protect networks or if ...
Bridging Protocols <ul><li>Operates at Layer 2 of the OSI model </li></ul><ul><li>Smart bridges, allow some form of intell...
Network monitoring and Discovery tools <ul><li>Ethereal - view the packets in real time </li></ul><ul><li>Nmap - port scan...
Installing Networking Hardware <ul><li>The Physical Install, PCI, ISA, USB </li></ul><ul><li>Drivers </li></ul><ul><li>Ker...
Configuring a TCP/IP Network <ul><li>Assigning IP addresses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>static (when is it necessary) </li></u...
Wireless LANs - The Future of Networking <ul><li>(a) Wireless networking with a base station. </li></ul><ul><li>(b) Ad hoc...
Marking <ul><li>Midterm Test 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Term Assignments/Labs 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Final Exam 40% </li></ul>
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Nad710 Introduction To Networks Using Linux

NAD710 Introduction to Networks using Linux
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nad710 Introduction To Networks Using Linux

  • 1. NAD710 - Introduction to Networks Using Linux   Course Overview May 28, 2003 Professor Tom Mavroidis
  • 2. Course Text <ul><li>TCP/IP Network Administration, 3rd Edition </li></ul><ul><li>By Craig Hunt Third Edition April 2002 0-596-00297-1, </li></ul><ul><li>Order Number: 2971 </li></ul><ul><li>746 pages, </li></ul><ul><li>$69.95 CA </li></ul>
  • 3. Introduction <ul><li>Never has there been such dramatic changes to the business world as we have seen in the 1990’s with e-business and the Internet. </li></ul>
  • 4. Architecture of the Internet <ul><li>Overview of the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide from : Computer Networks, Fourth Edition Andrew S. Tanenbaum </li></ul>
  • 5. Ethernet <ul><li>Architecture of the original Ethernet. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide from : Computer Networks, Fourth Edition Andrew S. Tanenbaum </li></ul>
  • 6. Search Engines <ul><li>The role played by Internet has forced companies to get connected to stay relevant so they may compete in today's fast moving markets. </li></ul>
  • 7. Uses of Computer Networks <ul><ul><li>Business Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Home Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobile Users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Issues </li></ul></ul>Slide from : Computer Networks, Fourth Edition Andrew S. Tanenbaum
  • 8. How was the Internet Built? <ul><li>In the 60’s and 70’s there were many different networks, protocols and implementations. </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing of information among these dissimilar networks soon became a problem. </li></ul><ul><li>A common protocol needed to be developed. </li></ul>
  • 9. Historical Maps of ARPANET <ul><li>Paul Baran in the 1960s envisioned a communications network that would survive a major enemy attacked. The sketch shows three different network topologies described in his RAND Memorandum, &quot;On Distributed Communications: 1. Introduction to Distributed Communications Network&quot; (August 1964). The distributed network structured offered the best survivability. </li></ul>
  • 10. A rough sketch map of the possible topology of ARPANET by Larry Roberts Dr. Lawrence Roberts led the team that designed and developed ARPANET, the world's first major computer packet network. Dr. Roberts, as ARPA's chief scientist, began to architect ARPANET in 1967 influenced by the theoretical packet switching work by Leonard Kleinrock. This research network evolved into the modern Internet.
  • 11. DARPA <ul><li>The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency funded the exploration of this common protocol. </li></ul><ul><li>The TCP/IP protocol suite evolved from the ARPANET protocol suite where the fundamental concept of layering was introduced. </li></ul>
  • 12. Backbone Protocol <ul><li>TCP/IP became the backbone protocol of multivendor networks such as ARPANET, NFSNET and other regional networks. </li></ul>
  • 13. TCP/IP’s Objective <ul><li>On the battlefield a communications network that sustains damage should be robust enough to automatically recover from any node or phone line failure </li></ul>
  • 14. A Suite is Born <ul><li>The protocol suite became popular when it was integrated into the University of California at Berkeley’s UNIX operating system. </li></ul>
  • 15. TCP/IP- Goodbye proprietary networks <ul><li>TCP/IP provides the ability to merge different physical networks using a common suite of functions and interoperability between equipment. </li></ul>
  • 16. TCP/IP Layer Model <ul><li>When networks first came into being, computer could typically communicate only with computers from the same manufacturer. In the late 1970s, the OSI (Open System Interconnection) model was created by the International Organization for Standardization to break this barrier. The OSI model was meant to help the vendors to create the standard network devices. The OSI model is the Primary architectural model for networks. It describes how data and network information are communicated from application on one computer, through the network media, to an application on another computer. The OSI reference model breaks this approach into Layers. </li></ul><ul><li>TCP/IP Layer Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>7 layer OSI model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 layer DOD model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Microsoft’s model </li></ul></ul>
  • 17. TCP/IP - The need for standards <ul><li>Gain an understanding of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the OSI and DOD Layer models </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the 802.x standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why standards play such an important role in the growth of the Internet </li></ul>
  • 18. RFC’s <ul><li>What are they? </li></ul><ul><li>The Requests for Comments (RFC) document series is a set of technical and organizational notes about the Internet (orginally the ARPANET), beginning in 1969. Memos in the RFC series discuss many aspects of computer networking, including protocols, procedures, programs, and concepts, as well as meeting notes, opinions, and sometimes humor </li></ul>
  • 19. Planning for growth <ul><li>Selecting the right class for your network </li></ul><ul><li>What is CIDR routing </li></ul><ul><li>Planning for IPV6 </li></ul><ul><li>Use private addresses to protect your network </li></ul>
  • 20. Subject Goals <ul><li>Gain an understanding of how Linux fits into today’s networked world </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Linux </li></ul><ul><li>Learn when a Linux solution is right </li></ul><ul><li>Install and administer the latest in Linux applications for resource sharing </li></ul>
  • 21. Governing Agencies <ul><li>ICANN The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers </li></ul><ul><li>IANA Internet Assigned Numbers authority </li></ul><ul><li>IEEE The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers </li></ul>
  • 22. IEEE 802 Specification <ul><li>The IEEE is a non-profit, technical professional association of more than 377,000 individual members in 150 countries who produces 30 percent of the world's published literature in electrical engineering, computers and control technology. They have defined the following specification </li></ul><ul><li>802.1 Internetworking 802.2 Logical Link Control 802.3 Ethernet CSMA/CD **** 802.4 Token bus 802.5 Token ring **** 802.6 MAN 802.7 Broadband 802.8 Fiber optic 802.9 Integrated Voice/Data 802.10 Security 802.11 Wireless 802.12 Demand Priority Access </li></ul>
  • 23. Gain an understanding of : <ul><li>Network Interfaces </li></ul><ul><li>IP Addresses </li></ul><ul><li>Address Resolution </li></ul><ul><li>IP Routing </li></ul><ul><li>ICMP </li></ul><ul><li>Resolving Host Names </li></ul>
  • 24. You will learn the differences between: <ul><li>Mac address </li></ul><ul><li>IP address </li></ul><ul><li>Subnet masks </li></ul><ul><li>Private Addresses </li></ul><ul><li>Public Addresses </li></ul><ul><li>Unless you already know the difference in which case you will review it </li></ul>
  • 25. Learn Common Linux Network Commands <ul><li>ifconfig </li></ul><ul><li>netstat </li></ul><ul><li>ping </li></ul><ul><li>traceroute </li></ul><ul><li>nslookup </li></ul><ul><li>route </li></ul><ul><li>dig </li></ul>
  • 26. Configuring Network Hardware <ul><li>Kernel Configuration </li></ul><ul><li>Linux network devices </li></ul><ul><li>Setup Ethernet </li></ul><ul><li>Install loadable kernel modules </li></ul>
  • 27. Configuring TCP/IP Networking <ul><li>Setting the Hostname </li></ul><ul><li>Assigning IP addresses statically </li></ul><ul><li>Automatically receiving an address (DHCP) </li></ul><ul><li>Subnet masks - what are they and what do they do? </li></ul><ul><li>Dividing networks using Subnets </li></ul>
  • 28. ARP and RARP <ul><li>The address resolution protocol </li></ul><ul><li>How does a machine communicate within the subnet? </li></ul><ul><li>When do we need to route using a Layer 3 Protocol? </li></ul>
  • 29. DNS <ul><li>Setting up name services (BINDx) </li></ul><ul><li>How does it resolve names to addresses and vice-versa </li></ul><ul><li>You will setup your machine with the name service running </li></ul>
  • 30. Setting up a DNS Nameserver <ul><li>When you need a nameserver </li></ul><ul><li>Why you may prefer to use your ISP’s DNS </li></ul><ul><li>Configuration files </li></ul><ul><ul><li>/etc/hosts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>/etc/resolv.conf </li></ul></ul>
  • 31. NFS Network File System <ul><li>Preparing NFS </li></ul><ul><li>Mounting an NFS volume </li></ul><ul><li>The NFS daemons </li></ul><ul><li>The exports file </li></ul><ul><li>nfsd and mountd </li></ul><ul><li>exports file </li></ul><ul><li>User vs. Kernel NFS </li></ul>
  • 32. Connecting Windows to Linux <ul><li>Samba is an Open Source / Free Software suite that provides seamless file and print services to SMB/CIFS clients </li></ul><ul><li>We will discuss and install samba on our machines </li></ul>
  • 33. Bridges, Routers and Switches <ul><li>Which device should be used to address a specific design goal? </li></ul><ul><li>What the differences are with each of these devices? </li></ul><ul><li>Why the layered model approach helps speed up the process required to bring products to market. </li></ul>
  • 34. Routing and Switching <ul><li>How does it differ? </li></ul><ul><li>What devices do we use to accomplish the task. </li></ul>
  • 35. Routing Protocols <ul><li>How information is passed between routers </li></ul><ul><li>How they can protect networks or if incorrectly installed expose them </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss RIP (routing information protocol) and OSPF (open shortest path first) </li></ul>
  • 36. Bridging Protocols <ul><li>Operates at Layer 2 of the OSI model </li></ul><ul><li>Smart bridges, allow some form of intelligence at Layer 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Spanning-Tree Protocol is a link management protocol that provides path redundancy while preventing undesirable loops in the network. </li></ul>
  • 37. Network monitoring and Discovery tools <ul><li>Ethereal - view the packets in real time </li></ul><ul><li>Nmap - port scanner </li></ul><ul><li>Npulse - front end for nmap </li></ul><ul><li>You will install and run these applications on your machines </li></ul>
  • 38. Installing Networking Hardware <ul><li>The Physical Install, PCI, ISA, USB </li></ul><ul><li>Drivers </li></ul><ul><li>Kernel Modules </li></ul><ul><li>How is it probed? </li></ul>
  • 39. Configuring a TCP/IP Network <ul><li>Assigning IP addresses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>static (when is it necessary) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>dhcp (when is it perferable) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Connecting the machines </li></ul><ul><li>Network configuration </li></ul><ul><li>Testing/Debugging the network </li></ul>
  • 40. Wireless LANs - The Future of Networking <ul><li>(a) Wireless networking with a base station. </li></ul><ul><li>(b) Ad hoc networking. </li></ul>Slide from : Computer Networks, Fourth Edition Andrew S. Tanenbaum
  • 41. Marking <ul><li>Midterm Test 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Term Assignments/Labs 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Final Exam 40% </li></ul>

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