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NASA on the advantages of Additive Manufacturing - potential of cost reductions of upwards of 50%

NASA engineers are pushing the limits of technology by designing rocket engines and aero-space components that take advantage of Additive Manufacturing. The latest advances in topology optimization and the freedom to combine materials in unique arrangements opens up the design space for tremendous performance improvements. This has led to new opportunities for creating structural components for current NASA missions. Read more here: http://bit.ly/Interview_NASA For more information visit our website: http://bit.ly/Smart-iAM_Website
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Automotive      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NASA on the advantages of Additive Manufacturing - potential of cost reductions of upwards of 50%

  • 1. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3274 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3210 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit Automotive IQ for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses and conferences: www.automotive-iq.com “Additive Manufacturing will continue to grow within NASA as more programs have become aware of the benefits.” NASA engineers push the limits of technology by designing rocket engines and aero- space components that take advantage of additive manufacturing. 3D printers can build parts by layering metal powder and fusing it together with a laser, a process known as selective laser melting. The latest innovation comes with NASA’s recent breakthrough: manufacturing a full-scaled copper rocket engine part. This accomplishment is another milestone in additive manufacturing and might help NASA to continue their journey to Mars. In the lead-up to Smart iAM Automotive IQ interviewed Craig Brice, Materials Research Engineer with the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Mr. Brice has over 15 years experience in additive manufac- turing and materials research and development with a research focus on alloy develop- ment and material characterization.