“PORT EVOLUTION IN AFRICA”
BY
PAUL ASARE ANSAH
MARKETING & PUBLIC MANAGER
(SPECIAL ENVOY OF PMAWCA)
PORT OF TEMA
PMAWCA
BEST PERFORMING PORT & BEST CONTAINER TERMINAL
IN WEST & CENTRAL AFRICA (2012-2014)
PORT OF TEMA
SUMMARY OF PRESENTATION
I. THE HUMBLE BEGINNING OF AFRICAN PORTS
II. THE ROLE OF SHIPPING LINES IN RESHAPING AFRICAN PORTS...
THE BEGINNING OF AFRICAN PORTS
 Africa’s trade with the outside world before the C20th was
through forts and castles alon...
 Infrastructure were generally poor as they could not compete
for funding with other social infrastructure like health an...
TRENDS IN THE 1990s THAT ATTRACTED SHIPPING LINES
TO INVEST IN AFRICAN PORTS
• The growing importance Africa’s trade with ...
ENTER THE SHIPPING LINES
 From the early 2000s the World Bank and the IMF guided
various governments into container termi...
CONTAINER TERMINAL CONCESSIONS IN WEST AFRICA 2004-2010
Container Terminal Concessionaire Year
Dakar (Senegal) DP World (U...
IMPACT OF PORT
PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP ON
AFRICAN PORTS
11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
i. Berth occupancy (working) of the container terminal improved
from 55% in 2003 to 81% in 2014 whereas berth occupancy (n...
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
TEMA 305,868 342,882 392,761 425,408 489,147 555,009 525,694 5...
PROJECTED GROWTH OF CONTAINER TRAFFIC IN GHANA: 2008 -2028
0
500,000
1,000,000
1,500,000
2,000,000
2,500,000
3,000,000
3,5...
2. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT IN AFRICAN PORTS:
THE CASE OF TEMA PORT
Port process automation:
• Automatic Ship Identificat...
• Electronic Data Interchange systems although sometimes
plagued by system failures.
• Electronic cargo tracking within an...
ELECTRONIC GATES: OPTICAL CHARACTER RECOGNITION SYSTEM
LANDLORD PORT AUTHORITIES IN AFRICA
Today the Bretton Wood institutions are leading an agenda to
position African ports as...
THE PRIVATIZATION PROGRAMME IN GHANA (2001 – 2004)
1. Increased Private Sector Participation in Cargo Handling
• Licensing...
1. “In most African ports, governments are still widely
involved in port management, mainly through public
landlord port a...
3. “For landlord ports, public bodies will retain the
ultimate ownership of assets (especially land), but will
transfer a ...
DANGEROUS TREND FOR AFRICAN PORTS
 Lack of legislative backing expose port reform activities
to excessive governmental in...
CONSEQUENCES OF THE TREND ON AFRICAN PORTS
 Private sector monopolies emerge with “footloose”.
 Port authorities become ...
 Where agreed key performance indicators are not met
the concessionaire often got away with it.
 Competition in service ...
CHALLENGES OF AFRICAN PORTS AND THE WAY FORWARD
1. INCREASE IN THE SIZES OF SHIPS CALLING AFRICA
• Ship owners operating b...
2.a. INCREASING PORT AND SHIPPING COST
 Larger ships and more total TEU carrying capacity
should ideally lead to economie...
NORTH-SOUTH CONTAINER FREIGHT RATES IN $/TEU: 2009-2013
SOURCE: UNCTAD MARITIME TRADE REVIEW, 2014
2009 2010 2011 2012 201...
2.b. HIGH PORT AND SHIPPING COSTS CONTINUED.
 In addition to high freight, shipping lines operating in Africa
impose extr...
3. ACTUAL AND ATTEMPTED PIRACY ATTACKS IN WEST AFRICAN WATERS
Source: ICC IMB PIRACY AND ARMED ROBBERY AGAINST SHIPS ANNUA...
11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
SECURITY PATROL BOAT IN TEMA PORT
4. LACK OF MULTIMODAL HINTERLAND ACCESSIBILITY
 Most of the ports in Africa are handicapped relying on
congested artery r...
PERCENTAGE OF ROADS PAVED- COUNTRY RANKING 2010-2008
African
Ranking
World
Ranking
Countries 2010 2009 2008
1 24 Mauritius...
5. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS
UNCTAD MARITIME TRADE REVIEW 2014
Types of pollution occurring in ports
GAS EMISSIONS
CARGO
OPER...
6. DELAYS IN CARGO CLEARANCE IN AFRICAN PORTS
• Delays in the transfer of containers from the terminals to the Inland
Clea...
1. CONTROLLING PORT AND SHIPPING COSTS:
THE GHANAIAN EXAMPLE
• In some countries government regulatory instruments have be...
 Shippers are required to provide advance cargo information
on shipments to enable pre-clearance documentation to
commenc...
• In recent years ship owners have come under increasing
pressure to increase energy efficiency and reduce
greenhouse gas ...
5. TRADE FACILITATION IN WEST AFRICA
Initiatives funded by West African development partners
Include:
• Transit Corridor R...
6. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUNDING SCHEMES
I. BOND FINANCING
The issuing of bonds is seen as a favourable means to rais...
II. THE CHINESE FACTOR IN PORT FINANCING
• In the United Republic of Tanzania, an agreement with the
Government of China t...
III. ESTABLISHMENT OF PORT DEVELOPMENT FUNDS
 African governments must begin to explore the establishment
of port infrast...
IV. REGIONAL MARITIME BANKS
 The establishment of the Regional Maritime Bank as
proposed by Maritime Organization of West...
7. OVERCOMING CAPACITY LIMITATION: TEMA HYBRID PORT
• Limited dredging of port basin to 10 meters @ US$ 1.7 Million
• Cons...
11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
CONSTRUCTION OF BULK CARGO HANDLING JETTY – TEMA PORT
PORT OF TEMA CURRENTLY
DATA SHEET FOR TERMINAL 3 DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
44
TOTAL THROUGHPUT CAPACITY
3.5 MILLION TEU
Entrance Channel & Harbour Basi...
Upgrade of Access Roads to Tema
Port
THE TEMA PORT EXPRESSWAY - UNDER A PPP ARRANGEMENT
Hamale Paga
Tamale
Yendi
Sawla
Fufulusu
Techiman
Sunyani
Nyinahin
Awaso
Takoradi
Accra
Tema
Kade
Tarkwa
Aflao
Omape
Akosom...
THE OLD PORT OF TAKORADI
THE NEW PORT OF TAKORADI
TAKORADI LIQIUD MUD AND BULK PLANTS
INSTALLED 1,020M3/DAY DESALINATION PLANT
SUB-SEA 7 FABRICATION YARD IN TAKORADI PORT
A LOGISTICS PLATFORM UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN TAKORADI
NEED FOR OIL SERVICES PLATFORM IN TAKORADI PORT
NEED FOR A CONTAINER TERMINAL AND ICDS
LINKED BY RAIL IN TAKORADI PORT
NEED FOR
ESTATE HOUSING
AS INITIATED BY ……
...THE PORT OF TAKORADI
NEED FOR TRUCK PARKS WITH RESTAURANTS, DORMITORIES,
VULCANIZING FACILITIES, ETC TO EASE TRUCK CONGESTION
IN AND AROUND THE...
of 56

Port evolution in Africa

A presentation by Paul Asare Ansah, communications director, Ghana Ports Authority and PMWACA Ghana delivered at the African Ports Evolution 2015 in Durban, South Africa More like this on www.transportworldafrica.co.za
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Business      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Port evolution in Africa

  • 1. “PORT EVOLUTION IN AFRICA” BY PAUL ASARE ANSAH MARKETING & PUBLIC MANAGER (SPECIAL ENVOY OF PMAWCA) PORT OF TEMA
  • 2. PMAWCA BEST PERFORMING PORT & BEST CONTAINER TERMINAL IN WEST & CENTRAL AFRICA (2012-2014) PORT OF TEMA
  • 3. SUMMARY OF PRESENTATION I. THE HUMBLE BEGINNING OF AFRICAN PORTS II. THE ROLE OF SHIPPING LINES IN RESHAPING AFRICAN PORTS III. IMPACT OF PORTS PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP ON AFRICAN PORTS IV. CHALLENGES OF AFRICAN PORTS AND THE WAY FORWARD
  • 4. THE BEGINNING OF AFRICAN PORTS  Africa’s trade with the outside world before the C20th was through forts and castles along the coasts from where slaves were exchanged for foreign products  Most of the ports in Africa were built in the early part of the C20th with roads and rail lines connecting them to raw materials production centres to facilitate the exploitation of such resources as manganese, bauxite, iron ore, timber and agro products like cocoa, coffee, groundnuts, cotton and rubber.  After independence, the ports were inherited and considered as strategic national assets relying on government subvention for maintenance and development. 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 5.  Infrastructure were generally poor as they could not compete for funding with other social infrastructure like health and educational facilities. Many of the ports suffered long periods of neglect and deterioration until the mid-1980s  In the mid-1980s the ports went through structural reforms increasing private sector participation in port operations as part of the structural adjustment programmes implemented with the view to transforming African economies.  Most of the ports were rehabilitated with grants from donors and soft loans from international financial institutions. 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 6. TRENDS IN THE 1990s THAT ATTRACTED SHIPPING LINES TO INVEST IN AFRICAN PORTS • The growing importance Africa’s trade with China, India, Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, etc. necessitated the development of Asia - African routes  The emergence of containerization necessitated action to adapt the ports to meet the needs of container handling  Lack of sufficient funds for port development.  Healthier economic growth rates averaging 3% that fuelled growth in cargo traffic.  Emerging signs of good governance 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 7. ENTER THE SHIPPING LINES  From the early 2000s the World Bank and the IMF guided various governments into container terminal concession deals with shipping lines especially the Bollore, Maersk, MSC groups and other foreign investors.  The ports of Abidjan, Douala, Tema, Cotonou, Lome, Dakar, Freetown, Monrovia, Apapa, Conakry, etc., were given face lift with modern ship to shore gantries and automation of key operational processes during this period  The Bollore group went further to link the ports with rail and water ways. These include:- Douala, Abidjan, Dakar, Bangui, and lately Cotonou. 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 8. CONTAINER TERMINAL CONCESSIONS IN WEST AFRICA 2004-2010 Container Terminal Concessionaire Year Dakar (Senegal) DP World (UAE) 2007 Conakry (Guinea) Bollore (FRANCE) 2008 Freetown (Sierra Leone) Bollore (FRANCE) 2010 Monrovia (Liberia) APM Terminals (DENMARK) 2010 Tema (Ghana) Meridian Port Services - BOLLORE - APMT - PORT AUTHORITY 2004 Lome (Togo) Bollore; MSC (SWITZERLAND) 2009 Cotonou (Benin) Bollore 2009 Apapa, Lagos (Nigeria) APM Terminals (DENMARK) 2006 Abidjan Bollore (FRANCE) 2004
  • 9. IMPACT OF PORT PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP ON AFRICAN PORTS 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 10. i. Berth occupancy (working) of the container terminal improved from 55% in 2003 to 81% in 2014 whereas berth occupancy (not working) reduced from 15% to 5% within the same period. ii. Container handling improved from about 10 moves per ship hour in 2005 to 23 moves per ship hour in 2014 iii. Container vessels time at birth decreased from 44.7hrs in 2005 to 28.6 hrs in 2014 iv. With only two terminal berths, container traffic in Tema Port increased from 233, 377 TEUs in 2002 to 842,000 TEUs in 2013 1. IMPROVED EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTIVITY IN CONTAINER HANDLING : THE CASE OF TEMA PORT
  • 11. 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 TEMA 305,868 342,882 392,761 425,408 489,147 555,009 525,694 590,147 756,899 824,238 841,989 732,382 TAKORADI 41,113 43,020 49,321 51,042 52,226 57,372 47,828 53,041 56,595 60,746 52,373 61,355 TOTAL TRAFFIC 346,981 385,902 442,082 476,450 541,373 612,381 573,522 643,188 813,494 884,984 894,362 793,737 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 800,000 900,000 1,000,000 TEMA PORT CONTAINER TRAFFIC IN TEUS 2000-2014
  • 12. PROJECTED GROWTH OF CONTAINER TRAFFIC IN GHANA: 2008 -2028 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 3,000,000 3,500,000 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 Year TEUs Optimistic Best E stimate Pessimistic
  • 13. 2. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT IN AFRICAN PORTS: THE CASE OF TEMA PORT Port process automation: • Automatic Ship Identification Systems • Master Terminal Management Systems • Deployment of ship to shore gantry cranes • Online Vessel Berthing Booking and Stevedoring Allocation Systems • Enterprise Resource Planning Systems
  • 14. • Electronic Data Interchange systems although sometimes plagued by system failures. • Electronic cargo tracking within and outside port • Destination Inspection risk management of containers with scanning equipment in almost all African Ports • Port security with the use of OCR and CCTV cameras; turnstile and speed stile equipment with biometric identification • One stop center for revenue and data collection 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 15. ELECTRONIC GATES: OPTICAL CHARACTER RECOGNITION SYSTEM
  • 16. LANDLORD PORT AUTHORITIES IN AFRICA Today the Bretton Wood institutions are leading an agenda to position African ports as land lord ports in which:  The port authority owns the land and infrastructure but the infrastructure is leased to private operating companies.  The private operating companies provide and maintain the equipment and employ labour to handle cargo.  Only the cost of infrastructure falls under the account of the port authority;  All other costs are covered by the stevedores. In many of the ports as in Nigeria and Cote d’Ivoire marine operations have equally been concessioned to the private sector 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 17. THE PRIVATIZATION PROGRAMME IN GHANA (2001 – 2004) 1. Increased Private Sector Participation in Cargo Handling • Licensing of 10 private stevedoring companies • 75% of stevedoring services transferred to the private companies • Bulk handling transferred to the private sector • 100% of shore handling transferred to the private sector • Six inland container depots established • Privatization of Port Labour (Ghana Dock Labour Company) Reduction of staff by 53% . Establishment of a Joint Venture Container Terminal (MPS) . Transfer of other non-core port services to the private sector
  • 18. 1. “In most African ports, governments are still widely involved in port management, mainly through public landlord port authorities. At the same time, the role of private enterprise in the sector will continue to grow”. 2. “Public service and tool ports will gradually disappear and be transformed into landlord ports; in some cases, fully privatized ports will emerge”. WORLD BANK PREDICTIONS IN 2007: PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN AFRICAN PORTS
  • 19. 3. “For landlord ports, public bodies will retain the ultimate ownership of assets (especially land), but will transfer a major part of the financial and operational risks to the private sector”. 4. “Governments will act mainly as regulators and land developers, while private firms will assume the responsibility for port operations”.
  • 20. DANGEROUS TREND FOR AFRICAN PORTS  Lack of legislative backing expose port reform activities to excessive governmental interference and control  Little or no involvement of port authority in the negotiation of port concessions.  Risk analysis and mitigation provisions are compromised as proper due diligence is not done  Many of the port concessions have poor compensation and payment structures 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 21. CONSEQUENCES OF THE TREND ON AFRICAN PORTS  Private sector monopolies emerge with “footloose”.  Port authorities become “restrained princes” incapable of exercising monitoring and regulatory functions over the concessionaires  Local content and technology transfer provisions are not respected but port authorities are unable to apply sanction for non compliance  Public sector interests are subordinated to the profit maximization motive of the concessionaire. Eg:- Escalation of cost of doing business as operators subject port users to regular price hikes 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 22.  Where agreed key performance indicators are not met the concessionaire often got away with it.  Competition in service delivery is stifled as almost all the terminals belong to the same actors.  The kind of port concessions in Africa provides the environment for the flight of potential capital for future development of the ports in Africa  Concessions threaten the financial viability of national port authorities 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 23. CHALLENGES OF AFRICAN PORTS AND THE WAY FORWARD 1. INCREASE IN THE SIZES OF SHIPS CALLING AFRICA • Ship owners operating both container and general cargo are resorting to Larger ships to reap economies of scale. • In the face of financial challenges, ports have to respond by expanding their infrastructure and equipment to accommodate these post-pannamax vessels or risk becoming feeder ports. 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems
  • 24. 2.a. INCREASING PORT AND SHIPPING COST  Larger ships and more total TEU carrying capacity should ideally lead to economies of scale and lower freight costs.  In 2012, the maritime sector experienced higher freights following the 2008/9 economic and financial crisis.  In 2013 however, freight rates along all the shipping routes came down with Africa recording the least reduction
  • 25. NORTH-SOUTH CONTAINER FREIGHT RATES IN $/TEU: 2009-2013 SOURCE: UNCTAD MARITIME TRADE REVIEW, 2014 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Shanghai–South America (Santos) 2,429 2,236 1,483 1,771 1,380 Percentage Change -7.95 -33.68 19.42 -22.08 Shanghai–Australia/New Zealand (Melbourne) 1,500 1 189 772 925 818 Percentage Change -20.73 -35.07 19.82 -11.57 Shanghai–West Africa (Lagos) 2,247 2,305 1,908 2,092 1,927 Percentage Change 2.56 -17.22 9.64 -7.87 Shanghai–South Africa (Durban) 1.495 1 481 991 1 047 805 Percentage Change -0.96 -33.09 5.65 -23.11
  • 26. 2.b. HIGH PORT AND SHIPPING COSTS CONTINUED.  In addition to high freight, shipping lines operating in Africa impose extra charges that increase the cost of doing business and unbearable conditions that defeat door to door delivery of containers: These include: • High Demurrage, • Release Fees, • Container Administration fees charged per container, • Exorbitant Container Deposits, • Container Cleaning fees, • Congestion Surcharges, • Ports Security Charges and • Short Container Rent Free Periods for Transit Containers
  • 27. 3. ACTUAL AND ATTEMPTED PIRACY ATTACKS IN WEST AFRICAN WATERS Source: ICC IMB PIRACY AND ARMED ROBBERY AGAINST SHIPS ANNUAL REPORT 2014 COUNTRY 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Benin 0 1 0 20 2 0 0 Ivory Coast 3 2 4 1 5 4 3 Ghana 7 3 0 2 2 1 4 Guinea 0 5 6 5 3 1 0 Liberia 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 Nigeria 40 29 19 10 27 31 18 Togo 1 2 0 6 15 7 2 Somalia 19 80 139 160 49 7 3 Terrorism threats following events of 9/11 have increased sensitivity to port security globally. In Africa in particular the rise in the incidence of piracy and armed robbery attacks heighten the feeling of insecurity in the maritime environment.
  • 28. 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems SECURITY PATROL BOAT IN TEMA PORT
  • 29. 4. LACK OF MULTIMODAL HINTERLAND ACCESSIBILITY  Most of the ports in Africa are handicapped relying on congested artery roads as the only reliable inlets and outlets for cargo.  As recently as 2010 only 11 countries in Africa had more than 50% of their roads paved.  Rail lines in Africa were built by colonial administrations from ports to raw materials producing centers. They are generally outmoded and inefficient.
  • 30. PERCENTAGE OF ROADS PAVED- COUNTRY RANKING 2010-2008 African Ranking World Ranking Countries 2010 2009 2008 1 24 Mauritius 98.5 98.0 98.0 2 26 Seychelles 96.5 96.5 96.5 3 30 Egypt 92.2 89.4 86.9 4 59 Algeria 77.1 74.0 73.5 5 60 Comoros 76.5 6 61 Tunisia 76.0 75.2 7 64 Morocco 70.4 70.3 8 68 Cape Verde 69.0 9 69 Sao Tome and Principe 68.1 10 79 Libya 57.2 11 84 Lesotho 53.0 Source: World Bank report 2013
  • 31. 5. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS UNCTAD MARITIME TRADE REVIEW 2014 Types of pollution occurring in ports GAS EMISSIONS CARGO OPERATIONS ACCIDENTS Cars Light Oil Spill Trucks Dust Cargo Spill Railways Noise Sewage And Sludge Ships Vibration Ballast Water Contaminants Cranes Wash Off Port Equipment Office (Cooling & Heating)
  • 32. 6. DELAYS IN CARGO CLEARANCE IN AFRICAN PORTS • Delays in the transfer of containers from the terminals to the Inland Clearance Depots • Delays by Ports’ inability to locate containers at the terminals • EDI system failures where EDI messages take a long time before getting to the recipient. • Delays by legislative and administrative impediments • Delays by the activities of multiple regulatory agencies • Delays by cumbersome customs clearance processes As a result of these delays manufacturing companies are unable to meet production targets and also have to pay high rent and demurrage on goods imported.
  • 33. 1. CONTROLLING PORT AND SHIPPING COSTS: THE GHANAIAN EXAMPLE • In some countries government regulatory instruments have been introduced to compel port service providers negotiate their rates with shippers representatives to forestall rampant price increases. • In Ghana for instance Regulation LI 2190 of 2012 requires that service providers in the shipping industry submit the structure of their rates and changes by October every year to Ghana Shippers’ Authority to allow for negotiations so that the agreed rates could take effect in January the following year. • Unlike other ports where service providers subject port users to rampant prices increases, all service providers engaged by the port to offer services must apply tariffs managed by the Port Auth
  • 34.  Shippers are required to provide advance cargo information on shipments to enable pre-clearance documentation to commence before the arrival of the vessel to prevent the payment of high rent charges and demurrage.  The clearing processes are being simplified to eliminate unnecessary bureaucracies. Customs has now introduced the Pre Arrival Assessment Reporting (PAAR) system.  Legal instruments of the ports and regulatory agencies are being reviewed to remove repetitive and time wasting procedures that increase the cost of doing business. 2. CONTROLLING DELAYS
  • 35. • In recent years ship owners have come under increasing pressure to increase energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping. • Ports are also under pressure to provide facilities to minimize emissions, cargo operations related pollution and accidental pollution. 4. INCREASING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY. • Automation must not be seen as alternative to dock labour in African Ports 3. CONTROLLING MARINE POLLUTION
  • 36. 5. TRADE FACILITATION IN WEST AFRICA Initiatives funded by West African development partners Include: • Transit Corridor Roads Rehabilitation, • Border Management Reforms-Joint Border Posts and Alignment of cross border customs working hours • ECOWAS Inter State Road Transit Scheme (ISRT) • ECOWAS Axle Load Management Infrastructure • Transit Parks and Rest Stops development, • Observatory for Abnormal Practices on the Transit Corridors
  • 37. 6. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUNDING SCHEMES I. BOND FINANCING The issuing of bonds is seen as a favourable means to raise revenue for new infrastructure projects. Raising development funding through the issuing of bonds helps ports to shore up cash flow and address liquidity constraints without relying on public funds. - United States - $12 billion worth of bonds - India, tax-free bonds of $769 million for port projects . - Peru, $110 million of bonds Port revenue bonds are retired through revenues, user fees and tariff charges paid principally by port customers.
  • 38. II. THE CHINESE FACTOR IN PORT FINANCING • In the United Republic of Tanzania, an agreement with the Government of China to build a $10 billion–$11 billion new port the historical port city of Bagamoyo was announced in 2013. • The new port will be the biggest in the whole of Africa and handle some 20 million TEUs a year when complete. • 34-kilometre road joining Bagamoyo to Mlandizi and • 65 kilometres of railway Connecting Bagamoyo to the Tanzania–Zambia Railway and the Central Railway. • In early 2013, a $933-million contract was signed between the Abidjan Port Authority and China Harbour Engineering Company Limited.
  • 39. III. ESTABLISHMENT OF PORT DEVELOPMENT FUNDS  African governments must begin to explore the establishment of port infrastructure development fund either at the country or sub-regional level to raise capital for future development needs of the ports as done in the United States, European Union and other advanced countries.  Specific fund can also be set up by respective countries to fund specific development projects as done by the UK for the development of the wind energy for the port industry.
  • 40. IV. REGIONAL MARITIME BANKS  The establishment of the Regional Maritime Bank as proposed by Maritime Organization of West and Central Africa with its headquarters in Abuja is long overdue.  Emergence of developing-country banks like the proposed BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) bank offers a great potential to raise funding to meet the significant needs for investment in maritime transport infrastructure
  • 41. 7. OVERCOMING CAPACITY LIMITATION: TEMA HYBRID PORT • Limited dredging of port basin to 10 meters @ US$ 1.7 Million • Construction of Bulk Teminal $122 Million • Construction of a new 800 TEU refer terminal and Transit Teminal • US$ 2.5 Billion For Tema Port Expansion and access road upgrade (Joint venture with APMT and Bollore group) • US$ 500 Million For Takoradi Port Transformation from Dependency on Export of Ore to a modern oil and gas hub 11/6/2015
  • 42. 11/6/2015 Marketing Information Systems CONSTRUCTION OF BULK CARGO HANDLING JETTY – TEMA PORT
  • 43. PORT OF TEMA CURRENTLY
  • 44. DATA SHEET FOR TERMINAL 3 DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 44 TOTAL THROUGHPUT CAPACITY 3.5 MILLION TEU Entrance Channel & Harbour Basin Dredged to accommodate vessels with 16 Meters draft
  • 45. Upgrade of Access Roads to Tema Port
  • 46. THE TEMA PORT EXPRESSWAY - UNDER A PPP ARRANGEMENT
  • 47. Hamale Paga Tamale Yendi Sawla Fufulusu Techiman Sunyani Nyinahin Awaso Takoradi Accra Tema Kade Tarkwa Aflao Omape Akosombo Dunkwa Kumasi Prestea G u l f o f G u i n e a DEVELOPMENT OF RAIL CONNECTIVITY TO THE HINTERLAND WITH PORT FACILITIES FOR RAIL TRANSPORT OF CONTAINERS AND GENERAL CARGO IN GHANA.
  • 48. THE OLD PORT OF TAKORADI THE NEW PORT OF TAKORADI
  • 49. TAKORADI LIQIUD MUD AND BULK PLANTS
  • 50. INSTALLED 1,020M3/DAY DESALINATION PLANT
  • 51. SUB-SEA 7 FABRICATION YARD IN TAKORADI PORT
  • 52. A LOGISTICS PLATFORM UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN TAKORADI
  • 53. NEED FOR OIL SERVICES PLATFORM IN TAKORADI PORT
  • 54. NEED FOR A CONTAINER TERMINAL AND ICDS LINKED BY RAIL IN TAKORADI PORT
  • 55. NEED FOR ESTATE HOUSING AS INITIATED BY …… ...THE PORT OF TAKORADI
  • 56. NEED FOR TRUCK PARKS WITH RESTAURANTS, DORMITORIES, VULCANIZING FACILITIES, ETC TO EASE TRUCK CONGESTION IN AND AROUND THE PORTS

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