John Callewaert & Nicole Berg
October 21, 2015
WOLVERINE CAUCUS
Preserving Our Great Lakes:
How Do We Adapt As They Change?
Presentation Overview
• Graham Sustainability Institute
• Water Levels Integrated Assessment
• Local Application: Planet B...
WHO WE ARE WHAT WE DO
Working to enhance quality of life for present and future generations
while safeguarding the planet'...
Education
Undergrad Scholars & Fellows (MS, PhD, Postdoc)
Integrated Assessment
Solving Wicked Problems
Water
Great Lakes ...
An Assessment…
• Or a review and analysis of research
and data related to a specific issue.
That Integrates…
• Policy or m...
Stakeholder
Input
Analysis
Teams
Develop Information and Tools to
Guide Decisions
Identify and Evaluate Options
Clarify th...
• Scoping & development
– Stakeholder mapping
– Shoreline property owners survey
– Development of an advisory committee
Wa...
• Purpose
– To help equip the region with a robust set of water
level adaptive strategies that protect the ecological
inte...
• Guiding Question
What environmentally, socially, politically, and
economically feasible policy options and management
ac...
Planning
Grants
• March – August 2015: Planning grant teams explore
feasibility of an IA in a specific location & prepare
...
1,815 Responses
70% Property owners
90% Residential
Owners/managers by
property locationQualtrics
Survey
Email
Distributio...
Results: Concern
25 44 33 74107
971
1300
838
323
12 11 17
1290
187
82
201
2
487
285
577
General Economic Environmental Soc...
Results: Impacts
499
247
172
140
29
Erosion
Recreational
Flooding
Operating expenses
Business revenue
Number of responses
...
Outreach: Water Budget & Fluctuations
e = evaporation
p = precipitation
r = runoff
Figure revised from
original, used with...
Planning Grants
• Land-use regulation and infrastructure policy
Richard Norton , University of Michigan (PI); Guy Meadow, ...
Planning Grants
• Stakeholder perceptions
Hans VanSumeren (PI) and Constanza Hazelwood, Northwestern
Michigan College
Planning Grants
• Threatened and endangered species habitat
Dennis Albert, Oregon State University (PI); Paul Drevnick, Un...
Planning Grants
• Tribal fisheries
Frank Marsik (PI) and Richard Rood, University of Michigan; Kyle Whyte,
Michigan State ...
Planning Grants
• Coastal bluffs & shoreline planning
David Hart (PI), Jane Harrison, and Adam Mednick, Wisconsin Sea Gran...
Planning Grants
• Coastal bluffs & shoreline planning
George Arhonditsis (PI) and Vincent Cheng, University of Toronto at
...
Planning Grants
• Visualization & scenario planning
Adam Fenech, University of Prince Edward Island; Daniel Scott, Univers...
Planning
Grants
• March – August 2015: Planning grant teams explore
feasibility of an IA in a specific location & prepare
...
Planet
Blue
Ambassadors
Planet Blue Ambassadors
• “Pursue stakeholder engagement, education, and
evaluation strategies toward a campus-wide ethic ...
theme guiding principle goals
climateaction
communityawawareness
healthyenvironments
wasteprevention
We will pursue energy...
Water Training Module
• Importance of the Great Lakes to area
ecosystems, recreation, and economy
• Breadth of U-M researc...
Ongoing Developments
• We use U-M research such as SCIP and the
Water Levels IA to:
– Update the training modules
– Create...
PBA Current Activity
• Over 3151 people have participated
• 2416 people have completed the training (2/3
staff/faculty, 1/...
Preserving Our Great Lakes: How Do we Adapt As they Change?
Preserving Our Great Lakes: How Do we Adapt As they Change?
Preserving Our Great Lakes: How Do we Adapt As they Change?
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Preserving Our Great Lakes: How Do we Adapt As they Change?

Dr. John Callewaert, Integrated Assessment (IA) Center Director at the University of Michigan's Graham Sustainability Institute; and Nicole Berg, manager of the Planet Blue Ambassador (PBA) Program at University of Michigan, discuss our changing Great Lakes.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Environment      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Preserving Our Great Lakes: How Do we Adapt As they Change?

  • 1. John Callewaert & Nicole Berg October 21, 2015 WOLVERINE CAUCUS Preserving Our Great Lakes: How Do We Adapt As They Change?
  • 2. Presentation Overview • Graham Sustainability Institute • Water Levels Integrated Assessment • Local Application: Planet Blue Ambassadors Program
  • 3. WHO WE ARE WHAT WE DO Working to enhance quality of life for present and future generations while safeguarding the planet's life-support systems Provost unit founded in 2006 30 dedicated staff 3 strategic advisory bodies Deans’ Council Faculty Executive Committee External Advisory Board $13M/yr budget (Gifts, Grants, General Funds) Lead U-M Presidential Initiative Integrate across all U-M units Influence real-world decisions Cultivate future leaders Extend U-M experience
  • 4. Education Undergrad Scholars & Fellows (MS, PhD, Postdoc) Integrated Assessment Solving Wicked Problems Water Great Lakes and Estuaries Climate Adaptation Planning, Literacy & Decision support Campus Behavior Cultural Indicators, Planet Blue Ambassadors Scientifically Rigorous Interdisciplinary Local-to-Global Scales Engaged with Practice Collaborative CENTERS & PROGRAMS COMMON PRINCIPLES
  • 5. An Assessment… • Or a review and analysis of research and data related to a specific issue. That Integrates… • Policy or management context • Diverse stakeholder perspectives • Several disciplines • An analysis of causes and possible solutions In order to…. • Build consensus • Inform decisions Integrated Assessment
  • 6. Stakeholder Input Analysis Teams Develop Information and Tools to Guide Decisions Identify and Evaluate Options Clarify the Issue (History, Causes, and Consequences) Define the Issue, Identify Challenges Offer Direction and Feedback Provide Background Data Prioritize Options Evaluate New Resources Develop New Resources Evaluate Options Conduct Analyses Gather Data Integrated Assessment Overview Analysis of Strategies and Policy Options 6
  • 7. • Scoping & development – Stakeholder mapping – Shoreline property owners survey – Development of an advisory committee Water Levels Integrated Assessment MDEQ, Office of the Great Lakes U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ducks Unlimited Wisconsin Harbor Towns Association ODNR, Office of Coastal Management Environment Canada The Nature Conservancy W. Michigan Shoreline Regional Dev. Comm. Conservation Ontario Ohio Lake Erie Commission Georgian Bay Forever Save our Shoreline International Joint Commission Wisconsin & Michigan Sea Grant Council of Great Lakes Industries Great Lakes Coalition
  • 8. • Purpose – To help equip the region with a robust set of water level adaptive strategies that protect the ecological integrity, economic stability, and cultural values of the region • Focus – Lakes Michigan-Huron & Erie – Identifying & evaluating adaptive management other options (not lake level control structures) Water Levels Integrated Assessment
  • 9. • Guiding Question What environmentally, socially, politically, and economically feasible policy options and management actions can people, businesses, and governments implement in order to adapt to current and future variability in Great Lakes water levels? • Key Impact Areas – Infrastructure − Shoreline economies – Water Quality − Nearshore & – Recreation & Tourism shoreland habitat Water Levels Integrated Assessment
  • 10. Planning Grants • March – August 2015: Planning grant teams explore feasibility of an IA in a specific location & prepare summary reports IA Phase 1 • November 2015 – April 2016: 4+ IA analysis teams each provide an interdisciplinary overview synthesis and report of status, trends, causes, and consequences IA Phase 2 • May 2016 – October 2016: With stakeholder input, each analysis team develops a report analyzing viable policies and adaptive actions IA Phase 3 • November 2016 – April 2017: Analysis teams work together with Graham personnel to develop a final comprehensive IA report of select options Water Levels Integrated Assessment Local Regional
  • 11. 1,815 Responses 70% Property owners 90% Residential Owners/managers by property locationQualtrics Survey Email Distribution (1,527) Postal Mail Distribution (288) 22% 73% 2% 1% 1% 1% Michigan (256) Huron (851) Erie (30) Superior (13) Ontario (11) H-E Corridor (7) Shoreline Property Owners Survey Jacboson 2014
  • 12. Results: Concern 25 44 33 74107 971 1300 838 323 12 11 17 1290 187 82 201 2 487 285 577 General Economic Environmental Social Level of Concern Not at all concerned Slightly concerned Concerned Very concerned Don't know Jacboson 2014
  • 13. Results: Impacts 499 247 172 140 29 Erosion Recreational Flooding Operating expenses Business revenue Number of responses High Water Level Impacts 1181 849 602 169 5 Recreational Water quality Operating expenses Business revenue Boat damage Number of responses Low Water Level Impacts Jacboson 2014
  • 14. Outreach: Water Budget & Fluctuations e = evaporation p = precipitation r = runoff Figure revised from original, used with permission from Sea Grant. This graphic shows the amount of precipitation compared to the amount of diversion in Lake Michigan-Huron, per minute. Developed by the Graham Institute. Data from GLERL • Elizabeth LaPorte
  • 15. Planning Grants • Land-use regulation and infrastructure policy Richard Norton , University of Michigan (PI); Guy Meadow, Michigan Technological University
  • 16. Planning Grants • Stakeholder perceptions Hans VanSumeren (PI) and Constanza Hazelwood, Northwestern Michigan College
  • 17. Planning Grants • Threatened and endangered species habitat Dennis Albert, Oregon State University (PI); Paul Drevnick, University of Michigan
  • 18. Planning Grants • Tribal fisheries Frank Marsik (PI) and Richard Rood, University of Michigan; Kyle Whyte, Michigan State University
  • 19. Planning Grants • Coastal bluffs & shoreline planning David Hart (PI), Jane Harrison, and Adam Mednick, Wisconsin Sea Grant; Bruce Bessert, Concordia University; John Janssen and Jenny Kehl , University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Jim LaGro, David Mickelson, Brian Ohm, and Chin Wu, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • 20. Planning Grants • Coastal bluffs & shoreline planning George Arhonditsis (PI) and Vincent Cheng, University of Toronto at Scarborough; Lynne Peterson, Consultant; Agnes Richards, Environment Canada
  • 21. Planning Grants • Visualization & scenario planning Adam Fenech, University of Prince Edward Island; Daniel Scott, University of Waterloo; Colin Dobel, Ontario Water Center
  • 22. Planning Grants • March – August 2015: Planning grant teams explore feasibility of an IA in a specific location & prepare summary reports IA Phase 1 • November 2015 – April 2016: 4+ IA analysis teams each provide an interdisciplinary overview synthesis and report of status, trends, causes, and consequences IA Phase 2 • May 2016 – October 2016: With stakeholder input, each analysis team develops a report analyzing viable policies and adaptive actions IA Phase 3 • November 2016 – April 2017: Analysis teams work together with Graham personnel to develop a final comprehensive IA report of select options Next Steps Local Regional
  • 23. Planet Blue Ambassadors
  • 24. Planet Blue Ambassadors • “Pursue stakeholder engagement, education, and evaluation strategies toward a campus-wide ethic of sustainability.” • Engage and empower any interested member of the U-M community in sustainability. • Foster a boots-on-the-ground network to create a culture of sustainability at U-M and support fulfillment of our campus sustainability goals.
  • 25. theme guiding principle goals climateaction communityawawareness healthyenvironments wasteprevention We will pursue energy efficiency and fiscally-responsible energy sourcing strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions toward long-term carbon neutrality. We will pursue purchasing, reuse, recycling, and composting strategies toward long- term waste eradication. We will pursue stakeholder engagement, education, and evaluation strategies toward a campus-wide ethic of sustainability. We will pursue land and water management, built environment, and product sourcing strategies toward improving the health of ecosystems and communities. Reduce scope 1 & 2 greenhouse gas emissions by 25%. Decrease carbon intensity of passenger trips on U- M transportation options by 30%. Purchase 20% of U-M food in accordance with U-M Sustainable Food Purchasing Guidelines. Protect Huron River quality by reducing runoff from impervious surfaces and reducing the volume of land management chemicals used on campus by 40% Reduce waste tonnage diverted to disposal facilities by 40% No formal goal adopted, but U-M will invest in programs to educate our community, track behavior, and report progress over time.
  • 26. Water Training Module • Importance of the Great Lakes to area ecosystems, recreation, and economy • Breadth of U-M research in this area • Individual and U-M action on reducing pollution and increasing water conservation • Energy module focuses on climate change affects on the Great Lakes region
  • 27. Ongoing Developments • We use U-M research such as SCIP and the Water Levels IA to: – Update the training modules – Create new action pledges where individual actions are available – Ongoing training, workshops, discussions, and information
  • 28. PBA Current Activity • Over 3151 people have participated • 2416 people have completed the training (2/3 staff/faculty, 1/3 students) • Over 19k pledges completed • 5,891,864 gallons of water saved • Over 5 million pounds of greenhouse gas emissions prevented

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