Population Migration in NYS: 1960-2010<br />
NYS Migration, 1960-2010<br />Since 1960, New York has lost 7.3 million residents to the rest of the country.  This was pa...
NY Migration Trends, 1960-2010<br />The 1970s was by far New York’s worst decade in the past 50 years in terms of domestic...
NYS Population, 1960-2010<br />Increase of 2 million people in the state’s total population since 1980, despite the contin...
Components of Migration, 2000-2010<br />Between 2000 and 2010, New York was one of 22 states (plus the District of Columbi...
NY Counties, Components of Migration, 2000-2010<br />New York City was the epicenter of migration in and out of New York S...
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Population Migration in NYS: 1960-2010

A new report from the Empire Center for New York State Policy reinforces what we already know here in Upstate New York...that our jobs and people are leaving. Facebook: http://facebook.com/unshackleupstateTwitter: http://twitter.com/unshacklenyBlog: http://blog.unshackleupstate.com/
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: News & Politics      Business      Sports      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Population Migration in NYS: 1960-2010

  • 1. Population Migration in NYS: 1960-2010<br />
  • 2. NYS Migration, 1960-2010<br />Since 1960, New York has lost 7.3 million residents to the rest of the country.  This was partially offset by an influx of 4.8 million foreign immigrants, resulting in a net decline of 2.5 million residents.<br />New York’s average annual domestic migration loss – the difference between people moving in from other states and out to other states -- jumped from about 60,000 people in the 1960s to an all-time high of nearly 237,000 in the 1970s.  The state’s domestic migration outflows have averaged between 130,000 and 160,000 a year since 1980.<br />For a second consecutive decade, New York’s net population loss due to domestic migration was the highest of any state as a percentage of population.<br />New York’s net migration loss – the sum of domestic and foreign migration – increased over the last decade to its highest level since the 1970s. Thirteen states had negative net migration between 2000 and 2010, and only three (Illinois, Louisiana and Michigan) lost a bigger share of their populations to migration than New York.<br />Source: McMahon, E.J., and Robert Scardamalia.Empire State's Half Century Exodus: A Population Migration Overview. Rep. no. 6.1. Empire Center for New York State Policy<http://www.empirecenter.org/Documents/PDF/Research-Bulletin-Migration-July2011-FINAL.pdf>.<br />
  • 3. NY Migration Trends, 1960-2010<br />The 1970s was by far New York’s worst decade in the past 50 years in terms of domestic migration outflows. <br />This was also the first (and so far only) decade on record in which the Empire State’s population actually declined.<br />Source: McMahon, E.J., and Robert Scardamalia.Empire State's Half Century Exodus: A Population Migration Overview. Rep. no. 6.1. Empire Center for New York State Policy<http://www.empirecenter.org/Documents/PDF/Research-Bulletin-Migration-July2011-FINAL.pdf>.<br />
  • 4. NYS Population, 1960-2010<br />Increase of 2 million people in the state’s total population since 1980, despite the continuing net outflow of residents to the rest of the country, can be attributed mainly to the “natural increase” of births over deaths. <br />Since New York’s population has risen much more slowly than the national average, it has lost 10 congressional seats since 1980, and will lose two more based on 2010 census results.<br />Source: McMahon, E.J., and Robert Scardamalia.Empire State's Half Century Exodus: A Population Migration Overview. Rep. no. 6.1. Empire Center for New York State Policy<http://www.empirecenter.org/Documents/PDF/Research-Bulletin-Migration-July2011-FINAL.pdf>.<br />
  • 5. Components of Migration, 2000-2010<br />Between 2000 and 2010, New York was one of 22 states (plus the District of Columbia) that lost more residents than they gained due to migration within the United States. <br />New York’s loss of nearly 1.6 million residents to domestic migration was equivalent to 8.27 percent of its base population at the start of the period, higher than any state or the District of Columbia.<br />This was also the first (and so far only) decade on record in which the Empire State’s population actually declined.<br />Source: McMahon, E.J., and Robert Scardamalia.Empire State's Half Century Exodus: A Population Migration Overview. Rep. no. 6.1. Empire Center for New York State Policy<http://www.empirecenter.org/Documents/PDF/Research-Bulletin-Migration-July2011-FINAL.pdf>.<br />
  • 6. NY Counties, Components of Migration, 2000-2010<br />New York City was the epicenter of migration in and out of New York State during 2000-2010.<br />Source: McMahon, E.J., and Robert Scardamalia.Empire State's Half Century Exodus: A Population Migration Overview. Rep. no. 6.1. Empire Center for New York State Policy<http://www.empirecenter.org/Documents/PDF/Research-Bulletin-Migration-July2011-FINAL.pdf>.<br />
  • 7. YouTube.com/UnshackleUpstate<br />Facebook.com/UnshackleUpstate<br />Twitter.com/UnshackleUpstate<br />Connect with Unshackle Upstate<br />UnshackleUpstate.com/army<br />For additional information, please read the full report from the Empire Center for New York State Policy here: http://www.empirecenter.org/Documents/PDF/Research-Bulletin-Migration-July2011-FINAL.pdf<br />

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