Political School by Vira Nanivska:
Mapping the Gaps of Reforms
Ukraine is perceived as a paradox set of contradictions: gr...
political competition. The only experience which both the authorities
and the opposition in Ukraine have is all Soviet, wh...
opponent. However, political instruments used by totalitarian and
democratic politicians are opposite.
Mission
By raising ...
 Ukrainian journalists;
 Ukrainian activists.
Coaches/ advisors/ consultants:
 European politicians;
 European bureauc...
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Political School by Vira Nanivska: Mapping the Gaps of Reforms

Ukraine is perceived as a paradox set of contradictions: great opportunities, unexpected accomplishments and every time – the big disappointment. Violations of human rights and freedom of speech, hostile investment climate, total corruption is seen as lack of political will of the President with his governing majority and failure of opposition the civil society. Ukraine is once again coming to the brink across which there will be no questions: to be or not to be? pass or fail the ultimate test?
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: News & Politics      Entertainment & Humor      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Political School by Vira Nanivska: Mapping the Gaps of Reforms

  • 1. Political School by Vira Nanivska: Mapping the Gaps of Reforms Ukraine is perceived as a paradox set of contradictions: great opportunities, unexpected accomplishments and every time – the big disappointment. Violations of human rights and freedom of speech, hostile investment climate, total corruption is seen as lack of political will of the President with his governing majority and failure of opposition the civil society. Ukraine is once again coming to the brink across which there will be no questions: to be or not to be? pass or fail the ultimate test? Why the Political School was created? Unfulfilled expectations concerning the Ukrainian political elite are nothing, but the Soviet legacy consequence. All the knowledge, skills, and the requirements the Ukrainian polititians are facing today are utterly incompatible with the demands of democratization and desovietization. Ukrainian politicians raised on the Soviet standards of public administration are perceived by the outside world as kind of inexplicable wonder of savage nature, but in no way as public politicians – a predictable, understandable European cultural product of the early 21st century. Ukrainian politicians have been deprived of new democratic instruments both for fulfilling their reform commitments and for
  • 2. political competition. The only experience which both the authorities and the opposition in Ukraine have is all Soviet, which inevitably turns every Ukrainian politician into the Soviet “nachalnik”. Ukrainian politicians have been deprived of any training of democratic standards of public communication etiquette, rules of civility. Reforms in Ukraine will not be effective without normative legal/ institutional principles of preventing corruption: prohibition of discretion, independence of regulatory, audit bodies from those they control, clearly defined penalties for violations. During 20 years of independence Ukrainian politicians didn’t pay attention to the process of managing transformation from totalitarian communism to democratic capitalism. They have been fully absorbed with the struggle for power and property, which became possible, thanks to the privatization and political liberalization early reforms. Once powerful Soviet “nachalnik” is now powerless facing freedom of speech, political rivals, stakeholder resistance, and honest democratic elections. Ukrainian oligarchs proved politically illiterate even to think of modern public administration, without which the country will not be prosperous and strong. No matter what is the political regime in the country – democracy or totalitarianism – tasks for politicians are the same: define strategy, prepare political decisions so as to ensure their adoption, organize and monitor implementation, gain public support, defeat political
  • 3. opponent. However, political instruments used by totalitarian and democratic politicians are opposite. Mission By raising awareness about democratic political behavior, breed the new generation of women political elite of Ukraine, capable for effective implementation of democratic desovietisation reforms. Objective Create an ABC-guideline for a democratic politician:  introduction into public discourse the concept of political competition instead of class intolerance;  clarification of incompatibility between Soviet “nachalnik” and European democratic politician;  reform planning and management in the democratic competitive environment;  policy and gap analysis in the reform process;  EU standards of public consultations with stakeholders;  EU standards of public/ state control over public/ state resources. Methods of Political School  diagnostics of democratic political capacity of the politician and political situation in the country;  individual and group political consulting;  European networking. Target audience  Ukrainian politicians;  Ukrainian bureaucrats;
  • 4.  Ukrainian journalists;  Ukrainian activists. Coaches/ advisors/ consultants:  European politicians;  European bureaucrats;  European journalists;  European activists. Partners  Advocacy groups (Center UA, OPORA, Mayor Association)  Donor projects  Mass media

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