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  • 1. Newsletter INFORMATION RESOURCE CENTER Embassy of the United States of America Budapest ∙ Hungary Security & Defense Foreign Policy • NATO • Response to Terrorism August 2010 U.S. PROVIDES SUPPORT DURING PAKISTAN FLOODINGTo date, the U.S. military has delivered more than 2 million pounds of relief supplies and food, A U.S. Navy aircrew helps Pakistani soldiers load relief supplies aboard a U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter during humanitarian relief efforts in Pakistans Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, Aug. 21, 2010 A U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter evacuates Pakistani flood victims during humanitarian relief efforts in Pakistan, Aug. 21, 2010. U.S. Marine Corps photos by Capt. Paul Duncan U.S. Marine Corps photos by Capt. Paul Duncan
  • 2. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huGOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS...............................................................................................3CONGRESSIONAL DOCUMENTS (HEARINGS, REPORTS, ETC.)...............................5THINK TANK PUBLICATIONS..............................................................................................7 2The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 3. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huGOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS MILITARY AND SECURITY DEVELOPMENTS INVOLVING THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 2010 | ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS. Office of the Secretary of Defense, August 2010. As President Obama has said, “[the U.S.-China] relationship has not been without disagreement and difficulty. But the notion that we must be adversaries is not pre-destined.” Sustained and reliable U.S.-China military-to-military relations support this goal by reducing mistrust, enhancing mutual understanding and broadening cooperation. China’s recurring decision to suspend military exchanges has impeded thiseffort. The Department of Defense will continue to use its interactions with China toencourage it to play a constructive role in addressing common security challenges in Asiaand globally. At the same time, the Department of Defense has a special responsibility tomonitor China’s military and to deter conflict. http://www.defense.gov/pubs/pdfs/2010_CMPR_Final.pdfGENERAL CALLS LAYERS KEY TO MISSILE DEFENSE STRATEGY. By Elaine Wilson,American Forces Press Service. Washington, Aug. 17, 2010The key to a successful missile defense strategy is layers, the director of the MissileDefense Agency said today. “Different missiles systems [are needed] so that if one fails orone can be tricked, you have a completely different missile system going after the secondshot,” Army Lt. Gen. Patrick O’Reilly said. It’s “very challenging to get through twosystems.” O’Reilly covered everything from U.S. missile defense priorities to cooperativeefforts with Russia. http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=60475THE NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR TRUSTED IDENTITIES IN CYBERSPACE; CREATINGOPTIONS FOR ENHANCED ONLINE SECURITY AND PRIVACY—DRAFT. U.S.Department of Homeland Security, June 25, 2010This first draft of NSTIC was developed in collaboration with key government agencies,business leaders and privacy advocates. What has emerged is a blueprint to reducecybersecurity vulnerabilities and improve online privacy protections through the use oftrusted digital identities. http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/ns_tic.pdf COUNTRY REPORTS ON TERRORISM 2009. U.S. Department of State. August 5, 2010. U.S. law requires the Secretary of State to provide Congress, by April 30 of each year, a full and complete report on terrorism with regard to those countries and groups meeting criteria set forth in the legislation. Beginningwith the report for 2004, it replaced the previously published Patterns of Global Terrorism.http://bit.ly/b2BwA0 [PDF format, 292 pages]; http://bit.ly/cLvJi7 [HTML format with links].INFORMATION SECURITY: GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE NEEDED TO ASSISTAGENCIES IN IMPLEMENTING CLOUD COMPUTING. U.S. GovernmentAccountability Office. Gregory C. Wilshusen. July 1, 2010.Cloud computing, an emerging form of computing where users have access to scalable, on-demand capabilities that are provided through Internet-based technologies, reportedly hasthe potential to provide information technology services more quickly and at a lower cost,but also to introduce information security risks. Accordingly, GAO looks at the benefits andrisks of moving federal information technology into the cloud. http://go.usa.gov/O2F [PDF format,12 pages]. 3The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 4. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu 4The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 5. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu NATIONAL SECURITY: KEY CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS TO STRENGTHEN INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION. U.S. Government Accountability Office. John H. Pendleton. June 9, 2010. Recent terrorist events such as the attempted bomb attacks in New Yorks Times Square and aboard an airliner on Christmas Day 2009 are reminders that national security challenges have expanded beyond the traditional threats of the Cold War Era to include unconventional threats from non-state actors. Todays threats are diffuse and ambiguous, making it difficult--if not impossible--for any single federal agency toaddress them alone. Effective collaboration among multiple agencies and across federal,state, and local governments is critical. This testimony highlights opportunities tostrengthen interagency collaboration. http://go.usa.gov/3Ed [PDF format, 26 pages].NUCLEAR SAFETY: CONVENTION ON NUCLEAR SAFETY IS VIEWED BY MOSTMEMBER COUNTRIES AS STRENGTHENING SAFETY WORLDWIDE. U.S. GovernmentAccountability Office. Web posted June 1, 2010.Currently, 437 civilian nuclear power reactors are operating in 29 countries, and 56 moreare under construction. After the Chernobyl accident, representatives of over 50 nations,including the United States, participated in the development of the Convention on NuclearSafety, a treaty that seeks to promote the safety of civilian nuclear power reactors. TheConvention has been in force since 1996. GAO was asked to assess (1) parties views onthe benefits and limitations of the Convention, (2) efforts to improve implementation of theConvention, and (3) how International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) programs complementthe Conventions safety goals. GAO surveyed the 64 parties to the Convention for which itwas in force at the time of GAOs review and analyzed the responses of the 32 thatcompleted it, analyzed relevant documents, and interviewed U.S. and foreign officials.http://go.usa.gov/3k5 [PDF format, 51 pages]. ARMY HEALTH PROMOTION RISK REDUCTION SUICIDE PREVENTION. U.S. Army. July 28, 2010. The report is the result of a focused 15-month effort to better understand the increasing rate of suicides in the force. The report is intended to inform and educate Army leaders on the importance of recognizing and reducing high risk behavior related to suicideand accidental death, and reducing the stigma associated with behavioral health andtreatment. It represents the next phase in the Army’s ongoing campaign to promoteresiliency in a force that has been at war for nearly a decade. http://bit.ly/9kypE7CONGRESSIONAL DOCUMENTS (HEARINGS, REPORTS, ETC.) PROJECT BIOSHIELD: AUTHORITIES, APPROPRIATIONS, ACQUISITIONS, AND ISSUES FOR CONGRESS. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Frank Gottron. July 7, 2010. Many potential chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) terrorism agents lack available medical counter-measures. In 2003, President Bush proposed Project BioShield to address this need. TheProject BioShield Act became law in July 2004 (P.L. 108-276). The 111th Congresscontinues to address several Project BioShield-related policy issues. These include whetherto continue diverting Project BioShield acquisition funding to other purposes; whether tochange the countermeasure development and acquisition process; how to replace 5The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 6. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hustockpiled countermeasures as they expire; and whether to alter federal efforts toencourage the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. http://bit.ly/bwHxr7 6The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 7. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huSTATEMENT OF STEPHEN J. HADLEY ON THE NEW START TREATY BEFORE THECOMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS UNITED STATES SENATE. U.S. Institute ofPeace. Stephen J. Hadley. June 10, 2010.On June 10, 2010, Senior Adviser for International Affairs Stephen J. Hadley testified beforethe Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on the new START Treaty.http://bit.ly/awgVGx [PDF format, 5 pages].NORTH KOREA: U.S. RELATIONS, NUCLEAR DIPLOMACY, AND INTERNALSITUATION. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Emma Chanlett-Avery and Mi Ae Taylor. May 26, 2010.North Korea has been among the most vexing and persistent problems in U.S. foreignpolicy in the post-Cold War period. The U.S. has never had formal diplomatic relations withthe Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (the official name for North Korea). Negotiationsover North Korea’s nuclear weapons program have consumed the past three U.S.administrations, even as some analysts anticipated a collapse of the isolated authoritarianregime. North Korea has been the recipient of billions of dollars of U.S. aid and the target ofdozens of U.S. sanctions. The report provides background information on the nuclearnegotiations over North Korea’s nuclear weapons program that began in the early 1990sunder the Clinton Administration. http://go.usa.gov/3mT [PDF format, 17 pages].THINK TANK PUBLICATIONSAMERICAN ENTERPRISE INSTITUTEDETER PYONGYANG THROUGH BEIJING. By Michael Mazza. AEI. Published in TheAmerican, August 17, 2010The Bush and Obama administrations’ policy toward North Korea—avoid angering Beijing’sleaders in hopes that they will voluntarily help in Pyongyang—has proven ineffective. It’stime to coerce China. http://www.american.com/archive/2010/august/deter-pyongyang-through-beijingWIKILEAKS MUST BE STOPPED. By Marc A. Thiessen, Visiting scholar at AEI,Published in the Washington Post, Tuesday, August 3, 2010WikiLeaks is not a news organization; it is a criminal enterprise. Its reason for existence isto obtain classified national security information and disseminate it as widely as possible--including to the United States enemies. These actions are likely a violation of theEspionage Act, and they arguably constitute material support for terrorism. The Web sitemust be shut down and prevented from releasing more documents--and its leadershipbrought to justice. WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, proudly claims to have exposedmore classified information than all the rest of the world press combined. He recently toldthe New Yorker he understands that innocent people may be hurt by his disclosures("collateral damage" he called them) and that WikiLeaks might get "blood on our hands."http://www.aei.org/article/102372 IRANIAN INFLUENCE IN AFGHANISTAN. AEI Middle Eastern Outlook No. 4, July 2010. This is the first in a series of Middle Eastern Outlooks documenting Irans growing influence in Afghanistan. As the United States targets the Taliban in Afghanistan, Iran is using soft-power tactics to combat U.S. influence and win over the minds of the people. This Outlook examines the activities of the Imam Khomeini 7The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 8. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huRelief Committee, a charitable organization that aims to promote Irans ideological andpolitical goals in Afghanistan. Since the early 1990s, the Imam Khomeini Relief CommitteesAfghanistan arm has been expanding its budget and reaching more and more Afghans,which poses a growing threat to U.S. interests. To succeed in Afghanistan, the UnitedStates must focus not only on the hard power of the military, but also on a comprehensivesoft-power strategy. http://www.aei.org/outlook/100976ARMS CONTROL ASSOCIATION ARMS CONTROL TODAY, July/August 2010 Features -The International Arms Trade: Difficult to Define, Measure, and Control. Paul Holtom and Mark Bromley -The Arms Trade Treaty PrepCom: Prepared and Committed? Daniel Mack -NPT: Back on Track. Alison Kelly -Future Prospects for the NPT. Deepti Choubey http://www.armscontrol.org/epublish/1/v40n6THE ATLANTIC COUNCIL OF THE UNITED STATES (ACUS) CONFLICTING POLICY PRESUMPTIONS ABOUT CYBERSECURITY: CYBER-PROPHETS, -PRIESTS, -DETECTIVES, AND –DESIGNERS, AND STRATEGIES FOR A CYBERED WORLD. Atlantic Council. Chris Demchak. August 9, 2010. The brief examines the strategic assumptions of cyberspace and the nature of the cyber threat. The author identifies a set of “cyber communities” and recommends a way ahead to reach consensus on organizing the U.S. government’s response to cyber challenges. The brief also addresses emerging issues in the cyber security and defenserealm, including international cooperation and private-public partnerships. http://bit.ly/9ao5ouIT’S TIME TO RATIFY THE DEFENSE TRADE COOPERATION TREATIES. AtlanticCouncil. Jonathan Ruemelin et al. July 20, 2010.During David Cameron’s first visit to Washington as Britain’s Prime Minister, the issue briefcalls for the White House and Senate to act to ratify the U.S.-UK and U.S.-AustraliaDefense Trade Cooperation Treaties. To affirm the U.S.-UK special relationship, and toadvance timely military, economic and diplomatic interests, Cameron’s visit is the idealoccasion for Washington to move on a treaty signed more than three years ago.http://bit.ly/aGty4l [PDF format, 4 pages]. PAKISTAN IN THE DANGER ZONE: A TENUOUS U.S.-PAKISTAN RELATIONSHIP. Atlantic Council. Shuja Nawaz. June 28, 2010. The Afghanistan war may be lost on the battlefields of Pakistan, where a vicious conflict is now being fought by Pakistan against a homegrown insurgency spawned by the war across its Western frontier. The author says that a year after the Atlantic Council raised a warning flag about the effects of failure in Afghanistan and the need to meet Pakistan’s urgent needs in its existential war against militancy and terrorism, the situation in Pakistan remains on edge. http://bit.ly/9sCdXk [PDF format, 28pages]. 8The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 9. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huUNCERTAIN KYRGYZSTAN: REBALANCING U.S. POLICY. Atlantic Council. RossWilson and Damon Wilson. June 30, 2010.According to the authors, the international community is failing to respond in wayscommensurate with the crisis. http://bit.ly/9doExT [PDF format, 6 pages].OPERATIONALIZING THE COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH.Atlantic Council. Julian Lindley-French. June 7, 2010.Julian Lindley-French, member of the Strategic Advisors Group(SAG), writes in the latest SAG Issue Brief about the need for theStrategic Concept to correctly address the issue of theComprehensive Approach, or political-military cooperation.http://bit.ly/b1PvZk [PDF format, 6 pages].BROOKINGS INSTITUTIONTHE NEW START TREATY: WHY IT MATTERS: A Discussion Featuring FormerNational Security Advisor Brent Scowcroft. An Arms Control Initiative Event.Brookings, July 23, 2010On July 23, the Arms Control Initiative at Brookings and the Arms Control Associationhosted former National Security Advisor Brent Scowcroft for a discussion of the New STARTtreaty, assessing how its ratification and implementation will serve the U.S. nationalinterest. Brookings President Strobe Talbott provided an introduction, followed by remarksfrom General Scowcroft. Morton Halperin of the Open Society Institute, Angela Stent ofGeorgetown University and Brookings and Senior Fellow Steven Pifer, director of the ArmsControl Initiative at Brookings, joined the discussion. Daryl Kimball of the Arms ControlAssociation moderated. http://www.brookings.edu/events/2010/0723_start_scowcroft.aspxPOSTCARD FROM ISRAEL. Brookings Institution. Martin S. Indyk. July 12, 2010.On a June 24-30, 2010 visit to Israel and Ramallah, during which he met with the topIsraeli and Palestinian leadership, Martin Indyk sensed a shift in mood, which could wellsignal a growing ripeness for Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking. http://bit.ly/9VOo4TUKRAINE – NOT YET LOST. Brookings Institution. Steven Pifer. June 30, 2010.A recent visit to Ukraine yielded two narratives regarding developments under PresidentVictor Yanukovych, now in his fourth month in power. The first narrative—seemingly thedominant one in the West—holds that Yanukovych is turning the country back to Russia’sgeopolitical orbit and restoring a more authoritarian political system. Perhaps; there areworrying signs. A second narrative, however, paints a more nuanced picture. SeniorUkrainian officials have said that, while Yanukovych attaches priority to repairing relationswith Russia, Kyiv seeks a balance between Russia and the West. http://bit.ly/dCnQ7kU.S. NUCLEAR AND EXTENDED DETERRENCE: CONSIDERATIONS ANDCHALLENGES. Brookings Institution. Steven Pifer et al. Web posted June 7, 2010.Nuclear deterrence has been a central element of American security policy since the ColdWar began. The deterrence concept is straight-forward: persuade a potential adversary thatthe risks and costs of his proposed action far outweigh any gains that he might hope toachieve. To make deterrence credible, the U.S. built up powerful strategic, theater andtactical nuclear forces that could threaten any potential aggressor with the catastrophicrisks and costs of a nuclear retaliatory strike against his homeland, say the authors. 9The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 10. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huhttp://bit.ly/aXm5SQ [PDF format, 69 pages]. 10The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 11. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huCARNEGIE ENDOWMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACETHE MODERNIZATION OF RUSSIAS FOREIGN POLICY. Dmitri Trenin. Video Q&A,CEIP. August 02, 2010Russia’s foreign policy priorities increasingly reflect the government’s drive to modernize itseconomy. In a video Q&A, Dmitri Trenin examines how the modernization agenda is guidingRussia’s foreign policy with major powers including the United States, Europe, and China.Trenin also looks at Moscow’s decision to support UN sanctions on Iran and U.S.–Russiancooperation on missile defense. While economic exchanges and cooperation on Iran point topositive trends in Russia’s relationship with the West, Trenin says that collaboration onmissile defense holds the key to transforming relations. Recent talks on missile defense area positive step, but “it’s very much an uphill battle and would require courageousleadership from both countries.” http://carnegieendowment.org/publications/index.cfm?fa=view&id=41322LEBANON’S MULTIPLE CRISES RISK ESCALATION. Carnegie Endowment forInternational Peace. Paul Salem. July 12, 2010.According to the brief, despite overall calm and a record tourist season this summer,Lebanon’s political system has been struggling to manage a number of major issues. Theseinclude skirmishes with United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) in the south,escalating rhetoric with Israel over oil and gas exploration, the renewal of debate overPalestinian civil rights in Lebanon, and concern that the UN will soon issue its preliminaryfindings in the investigation into former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafic Hariri’sassassination. http://bit.ly/aNWwap [HTML format, various paging].COULD AL-QAEDA TURN AFRICAN IN THE SAHEL? Carnegie Endowment forInternational Peace. Jean-Pierre Filiu. June 10, 2010.Lightly patrolled borders, sparsely populated areas, and recent terrorist activity raise fearsthat the Sahel is a fertile ground for jihadist movements, notably al-Qaeda in the IslamicMaghreb (AQIM). Regional cooperation and discreet aid from the West are critical forcountries to regain control of their territory and prevent al-Qaeda from gaining ground inAfrica, asserts a paper by Jean-Pierre Filiu. http://bit.ly/czwORK [PDF format, 16 pages].EXPLOITING GRIEVANCES: AL-QAEDA IN THE ARABIAN PENINSULA. CarnegieEndowment for International Peace. Alistair Harris. Web posted June 8, 2010.Al-Qaeda has successfully adapted its message in Yemen to exploit local grievances. Still,the violent jihad it advocates is not widely accepted by Yemenis at this point, and there is asmall window of opportunity to take steps to undermine al-Qaeda’s influence. An effectivestrategy to combat Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) must identify how the group’smessage resonates with Yemenis and develop ways for state institutions to addressunderlying complaints, contends the paper. http://bit.ly/9jOSfl [PDF format, 26 pages].UNDERSTANDING THE 2010 NPT REVIEW. Carnegie Endowment for InternationalPeace. Deepti Choubey. June 3, 2010.Last week marked the end of the month-long Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference.After intensive negotiations, the nearly 190 nations gathered in New York agreed to a finaldocument and notably called for talks on eliminating nuclear weapons in the Middle East.The final document prevented comparisons to the last conference held in 2005 which waswidely considered a failure, but there are still questions over how successful the conferenceactually was. Deepti Choubey explains that the conference achieved small but significantsteps and should be considered a win for the United States. http://bit.ly/drxwLP 11The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 12. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huCATO RETHINKING DARFUR. Cato Institute. Marc Gustafson. June 1, 2010. The war in Darfur has been devastating to the people, and its aftermath has been a tragic story of suffering, displacement and sorrow. At the same time, the war has become one of the most misunderstood conflicts in recent history. Analysts and activists have oversimplified the causes of the war, slighting its historical and systemic causes. The briefing draws on historical analysis, explores mortality surveys, and dissects six years of American budgetary allocations in Sudan. http://bit.ly/9Fgy4XCENTER FOR AMERICAN PROGRESS BUILDING A U.S. COAST GUARD FOR THE 21st CENTURY. Center for American Progress. Lawrence J. Korb et al. June 9, 2010. The authors outline challenges facing the Coast Guard and how the federal government can work to address them. The report demonstrates that meeting all the sets of challenges, as set out on the report, is crucial to the defense of our nation and the security and safety of not just our coastal waterways but also Coast Guard operations in international waters. http://bit.ly/9JAasL [PDF format, 58 pages].CENTER FOR A NEW AMERICAN SECURITYPERSPECTIVES ON RECONCILIATION OPTIONS IN AFGHANISTAN. David Kilcullen.Congressional Testimony, 07/27/2010CNAS Non-Resident Senior Fellow David Kilcullen testified before the U.S. SenateCommittee on Foreign Relations on the options for reconciliation in Afghanistan. Kilcullen’stestimony focused on stabilization issues within Afghanistan, including corruption,international aid and the drug trade. http://www.cnas.org/node/4776 CONTRACTING IN CONFLICTS: THE PATH TO REFORM. Richard Fontaine, John Nagl. Report. CNAS, 06/07/2010 In both Iraq and Afghanistan, there are currently more private contractors than U.S. troops on the ground. This report details the urgent need for comprehensive reform. The United States must embark on a path of ambitious reform that will require: new laws and regulations; an expansion of the government’s contracting workforce; a coordination mechanism within the executive branch; greater scrutiny, more transparency and clearer standards for private contractors; astrategic view of the roles contractors play in American operations; and a change in culturewithin the government. http://www.cnas.org/node/4560 RESTRAINT: RECALIBRATING AMERICAN STRATEGY. Patrick Cronin. Report. CNAS, 06/06/2010 Faced with a shifting and complex global environment, America is likely to encounter heavier security burdens in the years ahead. These burdens, coupled with an ongoing financial crisis and runaway deficits, will force the United States to make tough choices about strategic priorities. Report author and CNAS Senior Advisor Patrick Cronin calls 12The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 13. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hufor a The United States must pursue a strategy characterized by, in a word, restraint, asthe only viable means of sustaining U.S. power." Cronin lays out recommendations forachieving a pragmatic combination of engagement and restraint. http://www.cnas.org/node/4561 RHETORIC AND REALITY: COUNTERING TERRORISM IN THE AGE OF OBAMA. Marc Lynch. Report. CNAS, 06/05/2010 President Barack Obama shifted away from the rhetorical framework of former President George W. Bush’s “Global War on Terror” because he believed this would allow America to more effectively combat the challenge posed by violent extremists such as al-Qaeda. Despite this change in rhetoric, and dramatic changes from the early years after 9/11, the Obama administrations approach demonstrates striking continuity with the policies and philosophies adopted by the Bushadministration in its final two years. This report examines the Administrations efforts tochange Americas rhetoric and adapt to new threats. http://www.cnas.org/node/4545 CRAFTING A NEW VISION: A NEW ERA OF U.S.-INDONESIA RELATIONS. Abraham Denmark, Christine Parthemore, Rizal Sukma. CNAS Date: 06/04/2010 In the 12 years since its transition to democracy, Indonesia has emerged not only as a powerful political and economic actor in Southeast Asia, but as an important player on the global stage. A new strategic partnership between the United States and the world’s third largest democracy is essential to both nations. As the United States and Indonesia negotiate the bilateral Comprehensive Partnership Agreement, report authorAbraham Denmark recommends strengthening economic and security cooperation betweenthe two countries while helping Indonesia build capacity to contribute to regional and globalchallenges like climate change, economic integration and increased security cooperation.http://www.cnas.org/node/4559 SUSTAINING SECURITY: HOW NATURAL RESOURCES INFLUENCE NATIONAL SECURITY. Christine Parthemore, Will Rogers. CNAS, Date: 06/03/2010 In the 21st century, the security of nations will depend increasingly on the security of natural resources, or “natural security.” Countries around the world rely on the availability of potable water, arable land, fish stocks, biodiversity, energy, minerals and other renewable and nonrenewable resources to meet the rising needs and expectations of a growing world population. Yet the availability of these resources is by nomeans assured. This report - authored by Christine Parthemore and Will Rogers - points toAfghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Mexico and Yemen as examples of how natural securitychallenges are directly linked to internal stability, regional dynamics and U.S. security andforeign policy interests. http://www.cnas.org/node/4546 SERVE THE NATION: U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES IN AN ERA OF PERSISTENT CONFLICT. Michele Malvesti. CNAS Report, Date: 06/02/2010 U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF) are currently experiencing their most extensive use and greatest transformation. In playing direct and leading roles in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as in the broader U.S. effort to defeat al Qaeda and violent extremism across the globe, these 13The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 14. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huforces have become more operationally adept, endowed with more resources andorganizational capacity. They are encountering greater demands for their leadership andexpertise than ever before. Yet despite these developments, SOF are not optimized forsuccess. This report examines three specific challenges facing U.S. Special OperationsForces today, and presents recommendations on how best to utilize this invaluable corps ofelite soldiers. http://www.cnas.org/node/4544CENTER FOR STRATEGIC AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (CSIS) IRAN, THE GULF, AND STRATEGIC COMPETITION: KEY SCENARIOS. By Anthony H. Cordesman, Vivek Kocharlakota and Adam Seitz. CSIS Report, Aug 13, 2010 Iranian Strategic Competition with the US: The Military Dimension US competition with Iran has become the equivalent of a game of three-dimensional chess, in which other states are outside players that can constantly intervene, and one where each side can modifyat least some of the rules with each move. It is a game that has been going on for somethree decades. It is clearly unlikely to be ended by better dialog and mutual understanding,and that Iran’s version of “democracy” is unlikely to change the way it is played in theforeseeable future. http://csis.org/publication/iranian-strategic-competition SHOULD THE UNITED STATES COMBINE THE MISSIONS OF U.S. AMBASSADORS TO ASEAN AND SPECIAL ENVOY FOR BURMA? Center for Strategic & International Studies. Ernest Bower. August 10, 2010. The White House has not yet released a name for its choice as U.S. ambassador to ASEAN. Before it does, it might consider combining that mission with the position of U.S. Special Envoy for Burma, says the author. http://bit.ly/bf2OM4 [PDF format, 17 pages].RETHINKING EXTENDED DETERRENCE. Center for Strategic & InternationalStudies. Seung Taek Kim. July 2, 2010.The Republic of Korea (ROK) and the United States are allies that signed the MutualDefense Treaty. The primary mission of the Mutual Defense Treaty is to prevent war andmaintain peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula. The experience from the past sixtyyears shows that this security alliance has successfully served its purpose. For the U.S., ithas effectively dissuaded and deterred North Korea from taking overt military actions onthe Korean Peninsula by providing the ROK with “extended deterrence, including thenuclear umbrella” and displaying its overwhelming military force and political will to defendits ally from the North’s aggression. The ROK, confident in U.S. extended deterrence andsecurity commitment to its defense, has also been assured of its security and has believedthat the deterrence would hold effective. Such belief has been affirmed as the relativepeace and status quo on the Korean Peninsula has lasted over the past sixty years.http://bit.ly/aN3HsW In English [PDF format, 2 pages]. THE AFGHAN WAR: METRICS, NARRATIVES, AND WINNING THE WAR. Center for Strategic and International Studies. Anthony H. Cordesman. June 7, 2010. The US and its allies have made major progress in developing an effective campaign plan, and in providing the resources needed to win the war, since changes in strategy and leadership took place in 14The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 15. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.humid-2009. The reality is, however, that much still needs to be done, according to theauthor. The so-called surge in troops and civilians is only now beginning to be fully in placeand many of the key steps necessary to fully implement the new strategy are not yetdefined – much less in place. http://bit.ly/c97F83 [pdf, 52 pages].CENTURY FOUNDATION (TCF)NEGOTIATING WITH THE TALIBAN: ISSUES AND PROSPECTS. Antonio Giustozzi,The Century Foundation, 6/21/2010 The resilience of the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan over the past half-dozen years hasdispelled illusions of a military “victory” excluding them, and an end to the thirty years’ warin Afghanistan seems certain to involve their reintegration in some form into Afghanpolitics. In considering possible negotiations with the Taliban, one particular concern is howunited, or disunited, the Taliban really are: Is the control exercised by the leadership of theTaliban sufficiently strong to deliver on any negotiated settlement? Or is the control weakenough to allow for easily co-opting or buying off individual commanders, avoiding thepursuit of a settlement with the political leadership? This report by Antonio Giustozzi,written as part of The Century Foundation Project on Afghanistan in Its Regional andMultilateral Dimensions, lays out how the Taliban are structured and organized, with an eyeto assessing the impact of their organization and modus operandi on their willingness tonegotiate and honor a political settlement. http://www.tcf.org/publications/internationalaffairs/Giustozzi.pdfCOMBATING TERRORISM CENTER AT WEST POINT, U.S. MILITARYACADEMYCTC SENTINEL, July 2010 . Vol 3 . Issue 7FEATURE ARTICLE:The Mysterious Relationship Between Al-Qa`ida and Iran. By BruceRiedelhttp://ctc.usma.edu/sentinel/CTCSentinel-Vol3Iss7.pdfCOUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONSDEFUSING LEBANON’S POWDER KEG. Council on Foreign Relations. MohamadBazzi. August 6, 2010.Lebanon faces new sectarian violence, and tensions along its border with Israel threaten toboil over. Mohamad Bazzi says to help avert conflict, Washington must eventually engagewith the most powerful force in Lebanon: Hezbollah. http://bit.ly/d998eFCAN SANCTIONS BRING IRAN TO THE TABLE? Council on Foreign Relations. GregBruno. August 3, 2010.New sanctions have revived hopes that non-military action can cripple Irans nuclearprogram. But some analysts say these efforts could be undermined by Asian investment inIran as well as the regimes intransigence. http://bit.ly/aOBVNZ [HTML format, various paging].AL-SHABAAB. Council on Foreign Relations. Stephanie Hanson. July 28, 2010.The brief profiles the Islamist militant organization based in southern Somalia.http://bit.ly/9lKtCI [HTML format, various paging]. 15The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 16. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huTIME TO TALK TO THE TALIBAN? Council on Foreign Relations. Matt Waldman. July27, 2010.Despite a spiral of violence in Afghanistan, the United States must reorient its security-firststrategy and consider immediate talks with Taliban and other militant fighters, saysindependent analyst Matt Waldman. http://bit.ly/b89hD7 [HTML format, various paging]. 16The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 17. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huGIVING KABUL THE KEYS. Council on Foreign Relations. Greg Bruno. July 20,2010,International endorsement of a plan to hand security responsibilities to Afghan forces in2014 indicates NATOs military commitment is not open-ended. But meeting the deadlineamid ongoing Afghan governance issues could prove challenging, says the author.http://bit.ly/cxOpLr [HTML format, various paging].TURKEY’S COOLING TIES WITH U.S., ISRAEL. Council on Foreign Relations. StevenA. Cook. July 13, 2010.Turkeys relationships with longtime ally the United States and former strategic partnerIsrael have cooled markedly. The government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan isparticularly incensed about Israels raid on a Turkish boat trying to break the blockade ofGaza. http://bit.ly/bcPqmD [HTML format, various paging].THE LENGTHENING LIST OF IRAN SANCTIONS. Council on Foreign Relations. GregBruno. July 8, 2010.Decades of economic and diplomatic sanctions have failed to substantively alter the actionsof the Iranian regime, especially regarding its nuclear program. But experts say theyremain an important tool to isolate and pressure Iran.http://bit.ly/am6QD8 [HTML format, various paging].MANAGING A MORE ASSERTIVE TURKEY. Council on Foreign Relations. F. StephenLarrabee. June 3, 2010.Turkeys recent diplomatic strains with the United States and Israel reflect the "moreassertive and self-confident" posture of a country looking to reestablish its role as a majorinfluence in the Middle East and Central Asia, says F. Stephen Larrabee. http://bit.ly/ba1rphTERRORISM HAVENS: SOMALIA. Council on Foreign Relations. June 2010.According to the brief, Somalia is a chaotic, poor, battle-weary Muslim country with nocentral government and a long, unguarded coastline. Its porous borders mean thatindividuals can enter without visas, and once inside the country, enjoy an almost completelack of law enforcement. Somalia has long served as a passageway from Africa to theMiddle East based on its coastal location on the Horn of Africa, just a boat ride away fromYemen. These aspects make Somalia a desirable haven for transnational terrorists,something al-Qaeda has tried to capitalize on before, and is trying again now.http://bit.ly/bJ5JqE [HTML format, various paging].DELOITTE E-DISCOVERY: MITIGATING RISK THROUGH BETTER COMMUNICATION. Deloitte. June 2010. As the volume of electronically stored information (ESI) rises rapidly, improving the understanding among the C-suite, legal and IT functions is key to controlling costs and better managing e- discovery risks. http://bit.ly/cVRDrH [PDF format, 14 pages]. 17The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 18. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huFOREIGN POLICY IN FOCUS (FPIF)START NOW. Frida Berrigan. FPIF, August 12, 2010After 65 years, is there anything new to say about nuclear weapons? Their immense andalmost incomprehensible destructive power is well known. Their tenacious endurance as theweapon, even after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, is anunavoidable fact as nine nations currently stockpile these world menacers. Theirsuperpower allure to emerging states remains untarnished despite international treatiesdiscouraging proliferation. http://www.fpif.org/articles/start_nowGERMAN MARSHALL FUND OF THE UNITED STATES MARITIME SECURITY IN THE MEDITERRANEAN: EUROPEAN AND TRANSATLANTIC APPROACHES. Basil Germond, Eric Grove. GMF, August 4, 2010 This paper discusses maritime security in the Mediterranean, beginning, as current dynamics mainly result from long-term historical developments, by examining the evolving security situation in the Mediterranean and the interplay of littoral and outside actors that culminated in U.S.-Soviet confrontation in the Cold War. The paper demonstrates how the end of the Cold War has increased the relativegeostrategic importance of the Mediterranean, with new maritime security issues such asterrorism from the sea, drug trafficking, and illegal immigration becoming more important.This paper analyzes maritime security and naval cooperation in the Mediterranean in thiscurrent context, examining the relevance and capabilities of both NATO and the EU. Itconcludes by discussing, from both a European and a transatlantic perspective, the multi-directional and multi-dimensional challenges facing maritime security cooperation in theMediterranean.http://www.gmfus.org/galleries/ct_publication_attachments/GermondGrove_final.pdf AFTER THE STORM. Soli Ozel. GMF, July 30, 2010 The debate on the course of Turkish foreign policy heated up again in the wake of the Gaza flotilla catastrophe and Turkey’s no vote at the UN Security Council on sanctions against Iran. To argue as some do that Turkish foreign policy is guided solely by ideological considerations and by Islamic solidarity betrays a careless, ahistorical, and far too partisan a view of the current government’s record. http://www.gmfus.org/publications/publication_view?publication.id=939HERITAGE FOUNDATION COUNTERING TURKEY’S STRATEGIC DRIFT. The Heritage Foundation. Sally McNamara et al. July 26, 2010. For decades, Turkey and the United States cooperated in the Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, Central Asia, and even Korea. However, Turkish and U.S. interests in the Balkans, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Middle East, and the Persian Gulf have recently diverged. On its current trajectory, Turkey’s traditional strategic relationship with the West could devolve into a looser affiliation while Turkey enters into a closer alliance with Iran and other Middle Eastern powers hostile to U.S. 18The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 19. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huleadership. The U.S., in concert with its European allies, needs to address the seriousdifferences that are emerging, says the report. http://thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com/2010/pdf/bg2442.pdf 19The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 20. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu CLASSROOMS FOR SECURITY: HARNESSING ACADEMIA TO KEEP AMERICA SAFE. The Heritage Foundation. James Jay Carafano et al. July 7, 2010. A homeland security enterprise that can meet the threats and challenges of the 21st century requires the assistance and commitment of America’s educational system. Schools, colleges, and universities must focus on educating students and training professionals, while fostering innovation and planning for the future. More and more academic institutions are offering classes and degrees in issues relatedto homeland security. Partnerships between institutions of higher learning and theDepartment of Homeland Security are a crucial part of developing future homeland securityleaders.http://www.heritage.org/Research/Reports/2010/07/Classrooms-for-Security-Harnessing-Academia-to-Keep-America-SafeHUMAN RIGHTS WATCHBACK TO THE FUTURE: INDIA’S 2008 COUNTERTERRORISM LAWS. Human RightsWatch. July 27, 2010.The report is an analysis of the amendments to the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act(UAPA), enacted after the November 26, 2008 attacks on Mumbai that killed 166 peopleand injured over 300. Comparing them to previous legislation, the report finds that the newamendments contain provisions that are also likely to result in abuse of terrorism suspectsand the infringement of basic due process rights. http://bit.ly/di8kA4 [HTML format with links].WITHOUT SUSPICION: STOP AND SEARCH UNDER THE TERRORISM ACT 2000.Human Rights Watch. July 4, 2010.Police in the United Kingdom have long used “stop and search” powers to question andtemporarily detain people suspected of involvement in criminal activity. In 2000, the BritishParliament approved a new terrorism “stop and search” power giving police throughout theUK the power to stop and search vehicles and members of the public in order to preventterrorism, without need for reasonable suspicion that a crime has occurred. Failure tocooperate is a criminal offence punishable by up to six months in prison, a £5000(approximately $7,500) fine, or both. http://bit.ly/a1nYa4 [HTML format, various paging].INSTITUTE FOR FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS, INC. (IFPA) COUNTERING THE EMP THREAT THE ROLE OF MISSILE DEFENSE. Henry Cooper and Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr., IFPA, July 2010 Among the threats facing the United States are short-range ballistic missiles launched from vessels such as freighters, tankers, or container ships off our shores to detonate a warhead that could have catastrophic Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) consequences for the United States. After discussing the potential for a successful EMP attack, this report suggests what can (and should) be done to counter such an attack by using existing and near-term missile defense capabilities,beginning immediately. http://www.ifpa.org/pdf/IWGWhitePaper.pdf 20The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 21. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huINSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF WARSTATUS UPDATE: SHIA MILITIAS IN IRAQ. Institute for the Study of War, August16, 2010As the United States draws down its forces, Iraqi and U.S. officials must keep a close watchon the activities of enemy groups that can bring back sectarian violence and undermine theprogress to date. While Sunni terrorist groups such as AQI are responsible for most of theongoing attacks, Shi’a militia groups still pose a threat.http://www.understandingwar.org/files/Backgrounder_ShiaMilitias.pdfA WINNABLE WAR. Kimberly and Fredrick Kagan, Published in The WeeklyStandard, June 26, 2010Success in Afghanistan is possible. The policy that President Obama announced inDecember and firmly reiterated last week is sound. So is the strategy that General StanleyMcChrystal devised last summer and has been implementing this year. There have beensetbacks and disappointments during this campaign, and adjustments will likely benecessary. These are inescapable in war. Success is not by any means inevitable. Enemiesadapt and spoilers spoil. But both panic and despair are premature. The coalition has madesignificant military progress against the Taliban, and will make more progress as the lastsurge forces arrive in August.http://www.understandingwar.org/otherwork/winnable-war-kimberly-and-fredrick-kagan-twsINTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP (ICG) INDONESIA: THE DEEPENING IMPASSE IN PAPUA. International Crisis Group. August 3, 2010. The Indonesian government needs urgently to addressdiscontent in Papua, its easternmost region, and recognize that the root of the problem ispolitical, not economic, according to the report. http://bit.ly/ayllhC [PDF format, 16 pages].DRUMS OF WAR: ISRAEL AND THE “AXIS OF RESISTANCE.” International CrisisGroup. August 2, 2010.Of all the explanations of why calm has prevailed in the Israeli-Lebanese arena since theend of the 2006 war, the principal one also should be cause for greatest concern: fearamong the parties that the next confrontation would be far more devastating and broaderin scope. None of the most directly relevant actors – Israel, Hizbollah, Syria and Iran –relishes this prospect, so all, for now, are intent on keeping their powder dry. But thepolitical roots of the crisis remain unaddressed, the underlying dynamics are still explosive,and miscalculations cannot be ruled out. http://bit.ly/dirwTi [PDF format, 38 pages].INDONESIA: THE DARK SIDE OF JAMA’ AH ANSHARUT TAUHID (JAP).International Crisis Group. July 6, 2010.Divisions and ideological debates generated by Jama’ah Ansharut Tauhid (JAT), anorganisation founded by Indonesia’s best-known radical cleric, Abu Bakar Ba’asyir, showthe weakness of Indonesia’s jihadi movement. http://bit.ly/dqWZsP [PDF format, 16 pages]. 21The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 22. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huIMPROVING SECURITY POLICY IN COLUMBIA. International Crisis Group. June 29,2010.Columbia’s new government has to improve security policy to tackle the guerilla tactics ofthe Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia (FARC) as well as their broadenedparticipation in drug trafficking and newly forged alliances with other illegal armed groups,according to the report. http://bit.ly/cZlrKI [PDF format, 16 pages].KYRGYZ PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT MUST INTENSIFY STABILISATION EFFORTSIN SOUTH. International Crisis Group. June 16, 2010.Suggestions by Kyrgyzstans Provisional Government that the situations in Osh andJalalabad are stabilizing, that foreign intervention is thus not needed, and that areferendum scheduled for 27 June can go ahead, are dangerously premature, according tothe report. http://bit.ly/cloc9M [HTML format, various paging].INTERNATIONAL PANEL ON FISSILE MATERIALS (IPFM) REDUCING AND ELIMINATING NUCLEAR WEAPONS: COUNTRY PERSPECTIVES ON THE CHALLENGES TO NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT. IFPM, June 2010 This report explores the major policy obstacles that stand in the way of the nuclear-armed states deciding to eliminate their weapons. It includes perspectives from thirteen countries: the current nine nuclear- weapon states, and four non-nuclear states (Germany, Japan, South Korea, and Iran). The report is a companion to Global Fissile Material Report 2009: A Path to Nuclear Disarmament, which used thelens of fissile materials policies to examine challenges to the achievement of a nuclear-weapon-free world. http://www.fissilematerials.org/ipfm/site_down/gfmr09cv.pdfNATIONAL DEFENSE UNIVERSITY (NDU) PRISM 1, No. 4. NDU, August 2010 In Focus: Afghanistan http://www.ndu.edu/press/prism1-4.html JFQ, ISSUE 58, NDU JULY 2010 This issue focuses on identity politics. http://www.ndu.edu/press/jfq-58.html REFORMING THE INTER-AMERICAN DEFENSE BOARD. By John A. Cope. NDU, August 2010 Does the Inter-American Defense Board (IADB) have a future in an era of multidimensional security? Burdened by a mid-20th-century military structure and a tradition of U.S. leadership, lingering deep antimilitary discomfort within the Organization of American States (OAS), and severely shrinking financial and human resources, the Board, with its secretariat and 27-member council of delegates, has not been functionally useful to the OAS or its own membership and is ripe fordisestablishment. To preserve this important multilateral channel for communication,military standard setting, confidence-building, and collaboration, the Board must become 22The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 23. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.humore productive on defense and security issues, less threatening to diplomats, and clearlyresponsive to OAS direction. http://www.ndu.edu/press/inter-american-defense-board.html SOMALIA’S ENDLESS TRANSITION: Breaking the Deadlock. Andre Le Sage. NDU, June 2010 Somalia’s Transitional Federal Government (TFG) was given a second lease on life in January 2009, after successful peace negotiations in Djibouti produced new TFG leadership and yielded substantial international backing. However, the TFG remains weak and has yet to develop new political alliances or military capabilities that provide traction against Islamist insurgent groups. http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/StrForum/SF257.pdf 23The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 24. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu COCAINE AND INSTABILITY IN AFRICA: LESSONS FROM LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN. By Davin ORegan. NDU, July 2010 Beginning in 2006, several West African countries seized extremely large volumes of cocaine—measured in the hundreds and thousands of kilograms—in single hauls. These seizures were often accidental, indicating that actual traffic was likely much higher. Cocaine departs Venezuela, Colombia, and elsewhere in South America in shipping containers, on yachts, and by small planes and jets. South Americanorganized criminal and militant groups commonly deliver bulk shipments to West Africantraffickers in Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea, and Guinea Bissau, countries that the UN Office onDrugs and Crime (UNODC) frequently characterizes as the subregions cocaine "hubs." http://www.ndu.edu/press/cocaine-instability-africa.html CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS IN CHINA: ASSESSING THE PLA’S ROLE IN ELITE POLITICS. Michael Kiselycznyk and Phillip C. Saunders. NDU Center for Strategic Research, Institute for National Strategic Studies, June 2010 This study reviews the last 20 years of academic literature on the role of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) in Chinese elite politics. It examines the PLA’s willingness to support the continued rule of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and to obey directives from top party leaders, the PLA’s influence on the selection of China’s top civilian leaders, andthe PLA’s ability to shape the domestic political environment.http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/strategicPerspectives/china-perspectives-2.pdf ASSESSING CHINESE MILITARY TRANSPARENCY. Michael Kiselycznyk and Phillip C. Saunders. National Defense University Press. Institute for National Strategic Studies, June 2010 This paper presents a methodology for assessing military transparency that aims to confront the question of China’s military transparency from a comparative perspective. Drawing upon research done by Korean defense expert Dr. Choi Kang as part of a Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific working group, it focuses on defense white papers as a readily available and comparable source of officialdefense information. The paper develops an objective methodology for comparing therelative transparency of defense white papers by employing standardized definitions and afour-tiered set of criteria to evaluate transparency across 19 categories.http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/strategicPerspectives/china-perspectives.pdf NUCLEAR POLITICS IN IRAN. Edited by Judith S. Yaphe. NDU Center for Strategic Research, Institute for National Strategic Studies, June 2010 This collection of analyses on the unintended consequences of Iran’s nuclear policy for its domestic and international relations is the first in a series of papers that will examine the impact of critical issues and developments on key countries in the Greater Middle East and on U.S. security interests. Succeeding papers will identify similar emerging issues in Turkey, Iraq, Yemen, and the Persian Gulf region.For the most part, the papers will represent the independent research and opinions ofacademic scholars and regional experts prepared for and presented at the National Defense 24The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 25. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huUniversity. This inaugural paper focuses on the nuclearization of Iranian politics, society,and security. http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/strategicPerspectives/middle-east-perspectives.pdf 25The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 26. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huNATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCILNUCLEAR FORENSICS: A CAPABILITY AT RISK. National ResearchCouncil. July 29, 2010.The report examines how the U.S. can sustain and improve its ability totest intercepted nuclear material and devices, or in a worst-case situation,evaluate the aftermath of a nuclear detonation or radiological dispersal, todetermine the origin of nuclear material or devices.http://bit.ly/beW1IO [HTML format with links].PARTNERSHIP FOR A SECURE AMERICA TRANSPARENCY = SECURITY; 30 TOP NATIONAL SECURITY LEADERS ANNOUNCE SUPPORT FOR NEW START June 23, 2010 Senator Nunn joined a group of high-ranking national security leaders to sign a bipartisan statement in support of the new START treaty. Released by the Partnership for a Secure America, thestatement notes that "a world without a binding U.S.-Russian nuclear weapons agreementis a much more dangerous world." http://www.psaonline.org/article.php?id=668PEWCONCERN ABOUT EXTREMIST THREAT SLIPS IN PAKISTAN. Pew Research Center,Global Attitudes Project. July 29, 2010.Pakistanis remain in a grim mood about the state of their country. Overwhelming majoritiesare dissatisfied with national conditions, unhappy with the nations economy, andconcerned about political corruption and crime. Only one-in-five express a positive view ofPresident Asif Ali Zardari, down from 64% just two years ago. As Pakistani forces continueto battle extremist groups within the country, nearly all Pakistanis describe terrorism as avery big problem. However, they have grown markedly less concerned that extremistsmight take control of the country. http://bit.ly/cnLK6X [PDF format, 59 pages].RAND RESERVE COMPONENT UNIT STABILITY- EFFECTS ON DEPLOYABILITY AND TRAINING. Thomas F. Lippiatt, J. Michael Polich. RAND, August 2010 Personnel stability is highly valued by all military forces, particularly in combat units and other formations that deploy to a theater of operations. The U.S. Army in particular aims to maximize unit stability (that is, the degree to which a units membership remains constant over time). Yet, Reserve Component units typically experience a surge of personnel turbulence as they approach mobilization and deployment.How widespread is this problem, what causes it, and what might be done about it?http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG954/?ref=homepage&key=t_soldiers_trainingWHITHER AL-ANBAR PROVINCE?: FIVE SCENARIOS THROUGH 2011. RANDCorporation. James B. Bruce and Jeffrey Martini. July 30, 2010.The paper presents a discussion of likely scenarios for Iraqs al-Anbar Province over thecourse of the next three years. http://bit.ly/9li93g [PDF format, 28 pages]. 26The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 27. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu 27The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 28. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu AFGHANISTAN’S LOCAL WAR: BUILDING LOCAL DEFENSE FORCES. RAND Corporation. Seth G. Jones, Arturo Monoz. July 26, 2010. Security in Afghanistan has historically required a combination of top-down efforts from the central government and bottom-up efforts from local communities. Effectively leveraging local communities should significantly improve counterinsurgency prospects and can facilitate mobilization of the population against insurgents, according to the authors. The analysis documents lessons about the viability of establishing local security in Afghanistan and addresses concerns about the wisdom of such policies.http://bit.ly/bZ7JiK [PDF format, 115 pages]. VICTORY HAS A THOUSAND FATHERS: SOURCES OF SUCCESS IN COUNTERINSURGENCY. RAND Corporation. Christopher Paul et al. July 19, 2010. Relying on a collection of the 30 most recent resolved insurgencies, along with a bank of factors that helped or hindered the counterinsurgency (COIN) force in each case and in each phase of each case, several commonalities emerge. For instance, the data show that good COIN practices tend to “run in packs” and that the balance of selected good and bad practices perfectly predicts the outcome of a conflict. The importanceof popular support is confirmed, but the ability to interdict tangible support (such as newpersonnel, materiel, and financing) is the single best predictor of COIN force success.http://bit.ly/bjv3hT [PDF format, 188 pages].MEASURING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BORDER SECURITY BETWEEN PORTS-OF-ENTRY. RAND Corporation. Henry H. Willis et al. July 8, 2010.Focusing on three missions -- illegal drug control, counterterrorism, and illegal migration --this report recommends ways to measure performance of U.S. border-security efforts interms of interdiction, deterrence, and exploiting networked intelligence.http://bit.ly/9CxmaO [PDF format, 68 pages].UNCERTAINTIES IN THE NORTH KOREAN NUCLEAR THREAT. RAND Corporation.Bruce W. Bennett. June 23, 2010.The report examines the uncertainties in the North Korean nuclear weapon threat, includingthe number and nature of North Korean nuclear weapons, their potential delivery means,how they could be used, and what effects they might cause.http://bit.ly/akAjM7 [PDF format, 83 pages].THE ENDURING PARTNERSHIP? THE TRANS-ATLANTIC COMMUNITY AS ANATURAL ALLIANCE. RAND Corporation. Jeremy Ghez. June 21, 2010.The dissertation discusses the possibility that states which share a common constructedidentity can better coordinate their international agendas. http://bit.ly/9BAZuL [PDF, 512 pages].HIRED GUNS: VIEW ABOUT ARMED CONTRACTORS IN OPERATION IRAQIFREEDOM. RAND Corporation. Sarah K. Cotton et al. June 16, 2010.The use of armed private security contractors (PSCs) in the Iraq war has beenunprecedented. Not only government agencies but also journalists, reconstructioncontractors, and nongovernmental organizations frequently view them as a logical choice tofill their security needs, yet there have been a number of reports of PSCs committing 28The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 29. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huserious, and sometimes fatal, abuses of power in Iraq. The study uses a systematic,empirically based survey of opinions of U.S. military and State Department personnel onthe ground in Iraq to shed light on the situation. http://bit.ly/cr7Iyv [PDF format, 143 pages]. DEVELOPING AN ARMY STRATEGY FOR BUILDING PARTNER CAPACITY FOR STABILITY OPERATIONS. Jefferson P. Marquis et al. RAND, June 2010 The U.S. government is facing the dual challenge of building its own interagency capacity for conducting stability operations while simultaneously building partner capacity (BPC) for stability operations. The purpose of this study is to assist the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, and other U.S. government agencies in developing an integrated BPC for stability operations strategy. http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG942/?ref=homepage&key=t_army_soldiersSMALL ARMS SURVEY SMALL ARMS SURVEY 2010: GANGS, GROUPS, AND GUNS. Small Arms Survey, June 2010 The Small Arms Survey 2010 reviews a range of issues related to gangs and armed groups, focusing on their use of violence, as well as emerging efforts to prevent and curb the damage they inflict on society. The volume includes studies of prison gangs, girls in gangs, and pro- government groups; it also features case studies from Ecuador and Southern Sudan. Rounding out the book is original research on the global ammunition trade and on options for controlling illicit firearmtransfers by air. http://www.smallarmssurvey.org/files/sas/publications/yearb2010.htmlSTANLEY FOUNDATIONWMD, DRUGS, AND CRIMINAL GANGS IN CENTRAL AMERICA: LEVERAGINGNONPROLIFERATION ASSISTANCE TO ADDRESS SECURITY/DEVELOPMENT NEEDSWITH UNSCR 1540. Brian Finlay. Stanley Foundation. Conference Report, July2010Few regions of the world better illustrate the intimate nexus between human developmentand security than does Central America, a recent Stanley Foundation project reportconcludes. The report, informed largely by a regional workshop in Panama City earlier thisyear, analyzes a region of inherent economic and social promise that has long beenfrustrated by countless security challenges related to small arms, drugs, and criminalgangs. http://www.stanleyfdn.org/resources.cfm?id=430REVIEW AND VITALIZATION OF PEACEBUILDING. Stanley Foundation. ConferenceReport, June 2010In an increasingly interdependent world, strategic international coordination has proven alargely elusive ideal. The United Nations Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) was explicitlydesigned to confront this challenge and tailored to meet the demands of post-conflictcomplexity by providing an integrated and coherent approach to post-conflict peacebuildingand reconciliation.Five years after creation of the PBC, many of the issues it faces highlightthe challenges it is likely to confront in the long term, making this an ideal time to takestock of PBC experience and consider ways to maximize its potential. On May 21–23, 2010,the Stanley Foundation convened a conference that examined key issues for the reviewprocess. Many inspired consensus, while others raised questions in need of furtherexploration. http://www.stanleyfdn.org/publications/report/RVPBrpt610.pdf 29The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 30. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huSTOCKHOLM INTERNATIONAL PEACE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (SIPRI) SIPRI YEARBOOK 2010; ARMAMENTS, DISARMAMENT AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ‘The 12 chapters of SIPRI Yearbook 2010 and their accompanying appendices and documentation provide the single most comprehensive and in-depth assessment of developments in international security, armaments and disarmament over the past year’ (SIPRI Director Dr Bates Gil). The Yearbook 2010 is a compendium of data and analysis in the areas of security and conflicts, military spending and armaments, non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament. http://www.sipri.org/yearbook/2010/STRATEGIC STUDIES INSTITUTE. U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE U.S. MILITARY FORCES AND POLICE ASSISTANCE IN STABILITY OPERATIONS: THE LEAST-WORST OPTION TO FILL THE U.S. CAPACITY GAP. Colonel (Ret.) Dennis E Keller. PKSOI Papers. SSI, August 24, 2010 Stability operations in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to be challenged by the lack of effective local police forces to secure the civilian population from insurgent infiltration and criminal violence. Given U.S. government legal and organizational shortfalls to train and advise foreign police forces, coupled with an operational environment characterized by localpolice corruption and abusiveness, this monograph proposes a way ahead for effectivecommunity based policing despite these adverse circumstances.http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1013 CHINESE ENERGY SECURITY: THE MYTH OF THE PLANS FRONTLINE STATUS. Dr. Ryan Clarke. SSI Letort Papers, August 17, 2010 As the Chinese economy continues to expand at impressive rates, energy security strategies have assumed center stage in Beijing. Given that China relies heavily on energy imports, many are predicting the emergence of a blue water navy that seeks to engage in global power projection and secure China’s energy supply. These assessments are incorrect. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1012 DEFENSE ENERGY RESILIENCE: LESSONS FROM ECOLOGY. Dr. Scott Thomas, Mr. David Kerner. SSI Letort Papers, August 13, 2010 National Security relies heavily on the ready availability of energy resources in the types, quantities, and locations the military demands. While U.S. energy needs are currently met, the shrinking gap between global supply and demand draws the world closer to a tipping point at which human behavior is less predictable, competition overwhelms social and geopolitical normalizing forces, and conflict becomes more likely andmore pronounced. Given concerns about future resource availability, DoD would be wellserved by devising and implementing a sustainable, resilient energy strategy thataddresses current projections and adapts to evolving conditions.http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1011 30The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 31. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu ORGANIZING TO COMPETE IN THE POLITICAL TERRAIN. Dr. Nadia Schadlow. SSI, August 2010 In this analysis, the author identifies some of the contining obstacles to achieving civil-military integration in war. She argues that there are continuing disagreements about who should lead the shaping of the political landscape in war, and that while doctrine has advanced in this area, good doctrine does not guarantee the effective execution of governance-related tasks. Sound operational approaches are required as well. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?PubID=1007 PROJECT ON NATIONAL SECURITY REFORM: VISION WORKING GROUP REPORT AND SCENARIOS. Dr. Sheila R. Ronis. SSI, July 30, 2010 On November 26, 2008, the Project on National Security Reform submitted its 2-year study of the national security system, "Forging a New Shield," to the President, President-elect, and Congress. The work of the Vision Working Group led to the formulation of the following recommendation: The country must establish a mechanism to infuse greater foresight into the Executive Branch, and in particular thenational security system. This proposed mechanism, named the Center for StrategicAnalysis and Assessment, would exist and operate within the Executive Office of thePresident. This volume details the proposed architecture and operation of the Center.http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1002 U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE GUIDE TO NATIONAL SECURITY ISSUES, VOL I: THEORY OF WAR AND STRATEGY, 4th Edition. Edited by Dr. J. Boone Bartholomees, Jr. SSI, July 27, 2010 This edition of the U. S. Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy reflects both the method and manner the college uses to teach strategy formulation to America’s future senior leaders. It contains essays on the general security environment, strategic thought and formulation, the elements of national power, the national security policymaking process in the United States, and selected strategic issues.http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1004 U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE GUIDE TO NATIONAL SECURITY ISSUES, VOL II: NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY AND STRATEGY, 4th Edition. Edited by Dr. J. Boone Bartholomees, Jr. Jr. SSI, July 27, 2010 This edition of the U. S. Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy reflects both the method and manner the college uses to teach strategy formulation to America’s future senior leaders. It contains essays on the general security environment, strategic thought and formulation, the elements of national power, the national securitypolicymaking process in the United States, and selected strategicissues. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1005 31The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 32. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.huGOT VISION? UNITY OF VISION IN POLICY AND STRATEGY: WHAT IT IS AND WHYWE NEED IT. Dr. Anna Simons. SSI, July 20, 2010Having the right "who" to devise strategy is critical to success in counterinsurgency or anyasymmetric, cross-cultural encounter. This 32The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 33. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.humonograph contends that if we do not get the "who" right, none of the "whats," in terms ofwhat we do, matters. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=998 THE RUSSIAN MILITARY TODAY AND TOMORROW: ESSAYS IN MEMORY OF MARY FITZGERALD. Edited by Dr. Stephen J. Blank, Dr. Richard Weitz. SSI, July 14, 2010 The essays in this volume represent both a memorial and an analytical call to action. Mary Fitzgerald of the Hudson Institute was one of the most brilliant and vivacious practitioners of the study of the Russian and Chinese militaries, whose insights helped not just to put those fields of study on the map, but also to influence U.S. military thinking. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=997 THE PLA AT HOME AND ABROAD: ASSESSING THE OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES OF CHINAS MILITARY. Edited by Mr. Roy Kamphausen, Dr. David Lai, Dr. Andrew Scobell. SSI, July 06, 2010 In 2009, the Peoples Republic of China, the Peoples Liberation Army (PLA) Navy, and the PLA Air Force celebrated their 60th anniversaries. Behind China’s economic development, the PLA parades, and the spectacular celebration fireworks, the world clearly saw an ambitious China edging its way to the center stage of international economic, political, and military affairs. However, a few other major events in the last2 years came just in time to remind the Chinese leaders, and the world as well, that Chinastill faced a challenging future. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=995ENDGAME FOR THE WEST IN AFGHANISTAN? EXPLAINING THE DECLINE INSUPPORT FOR THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN IN THE UNITED STATES, GREATBRITAIN, CANADA, AUSTRALIA, FRANCE AND GERMANY. Strategic StudiesInstitute. Charles A. Miller. June 2010.Domestic public opinion is frequently and correctly described as a crucial battlefront in thewar in Afghanistan. Commentary by media and political figures currently notes not only thefalling support for the war in the U.S. but also in many of its key allies in Europe andelsewhere, making it all the more difficult for the Obama administration to secure the helpit believes it needs to bring the war to a successful conclusion. The study is an examinationof the determinants of domestic support for and opposition to the war in Afghanistan in theUnited States and in five of its key allies, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Canada,and Australia. http://go.usa.gov/OrI [PDF format, 174 pages].UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACETHE QDR IN PERSPECTIVE: MEETING AMERICA’S NATIONAL SECURITY NEEDS INTHE 21ST CENTURY. CORRECTED ADVANCE Copy of the Final Report of theQuadrennial Defense Review Independent Panel. Stephen J. Hadley, Co-ChairmanWilliam J. Perry, Co-Chairman et al. USIP, July 29, 2010.The Report first conducts a brief survey of foreign policy, with special emphasis on themissions that America‘s military has been called on to perform since the fall of the BerlinWall. In the next two chapters, it turns to the capabilities which the government mustdevelop and sustain in order to protect those enduring interests. In the third chapter, italso reviews the military‘s personnel policies; the fifth chapter deals with the QDR processitself. http://www.usip.org/files/qdr/qdrreport.pdf 33The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government
  • 34. American embassy • information resource center • BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Phone: 36 1 475-4442 • E-mail: infousa@usembassy.hu INFORMAL DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN AFGHANISTAN. U.S. Institute of Peace. Noah Coburn and John Dempsey. August 2010. The report discusses informal justice in Afghanistan and its relationship to state institutions. It draws on a series of pilot projects sponsored and overseen by the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and on work by other nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), international donors, and the international military in Afghanistan, as well as on field visits by the authors. http://bit.ly/cugula [PDF format, 20 pages].GRADUATE EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN INTERNATIONALPEACE AND CONFLICT. U.S. Institute of Peace. Nike Carstarphen et al. August2010.The report examines the match between graduate academic programs in internationalpeace and conflict, and the needs of organizations and agencies that hire individuals forconflict-focused work in the field. http://bit.ly/9lwrW3 [PDF format, 12 pages].SCENARIOS FOR SUDAN’S FUTURE, REVISITED. U.S. Institute of Peace. Jon Teminand Jair Van Der Lijn. Web posted August 2010.Many of the post-referendum scenarios in Sudan envisioned by the U.S. Institute of Peaceand Clingendael Institute one year ago remain plausible today, less than six months priorto the referendum. http://bit.ly/c0aqH9 [PDF format, 5 pages].THE ECONOMY OF BURMA/MYANMAR ON THE EVE OF THE 2010 ELECTIONS. U.S.Institute of Peace. Lex Rieffel. July 8, 2010.The government of Burma is undergoing a critical transition: Before the end of 2010, themilitary regime that has ruled the country since a palace coup in 1998 will hold an electionbased on a constitution drafted in a nondemocratic process and approved by a referendumin 2008. The referendum fell far short of global standards of credibility and the election islikely to yield a government that neither the antimilitary movement nor the internationalcommunity views as legitimate. However, the constitution and election also may offeropportunities for further international involvement that began in the wake of Cyclone Nargisin 2008. http://bit.ly/cnd1X2 In Burmese [PDF format, 28 pages].MEDIATING PEACE WITH PROSCRIBED ARMED GROUPS. U.S. Institute of Peace.Veronique Dudouet. June 1, 2010.Reforms to antiterrorism legislation are required to improve its effectiveness and fairnessand make it possible to engage diplomatically with proscribed armed groups. The legalbases for proscription should be clarified and the criteria for delisting published. Listing anddelisting instruments should be more nuanced and flexible. In addition, a separate legaland political component should facilitate engagement with proscribed groups in peaceprocesses and humanitarian work. http://bit.ly/9asR9b [PDF format, 12 pages].A NEW KIND OF BALKANS DRAMA. U.S. Institute of Peace. Daniel Serwer. June2010.The Balkans face more trouble in Kosovo as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina unless theUnited States and European Union take dramatic steps to get both back on track toward EUmembership, says the author. http://bit.ly/ckIl0K [PDF format, 3 pages]. 34The opinions expressed in these publications do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Government

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