Native American Rights Movement
Beginnings

Beginning from the Native American's first
contact with Europeans, they have fought
and struggled against lan...
Gertrude Bonnin

Native Americans also formed pan-Indian
organizations that protested the negative
aspects of the Federal...
1960s

Throughout the 1960s, Native American
activism continued to show dramatic
increases as younger American Indians,
e...
1970s

In the 1970s, sovereignty became the chief
rallying cry for Native American activists.
One movement was the Americ...
Recent Years

In recent years, Native American activists
have continued to focus on land and other
treaty rights. However...
Winona LaDuke

Activist Winona LaDuke has launched a
fight against the dumping of toxic and
nuclear wastes on reservation...
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Native American Civil Rights Movement

A presentation of the Native American civil rights movement.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Native American Civil Rights Movement

  • 1. Native American Rights Movement
  • 2. Beginnings  Beginning from the Native American's first contact with Europeans, they have fought and struggled against land encroachment and forced acculturation. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Native Americans increasingly demanded equitable treatment by the U.S. Government, in addition to respect for the rights and lands that are guaranteed to them by treaties.  Once Native Americans abandoned military resistance, they sometimes utilized the U.S. Court system to win rights. In 1831, the Cherokee sued Georgia to prevent the state from forcing them to evacuate their homeland, but they did not succeed.  Ponca chief Standing Bear won a case that proved Native Americans were deemed persons within the meaning of Constitution and could sue for a writ of habeas corpus. Also, in the 20th century, tribes sued the federal government thousands of times over land claims.
  • 3. Gertrude Bonnin  Native Americans also formed pan-Indian organizations that protested the negative aspects of the Federal Indian policy. The Society of American Indians, one of the first such organizations, Famous Sioux activist Gertrude Bonnin served as secretary in 1916. She later traveled to Indian reservations to gain support for the passage of the Indian Citizenship act.
  • 4. 1960s  Throughout the 1960s, Native American activism continued to show dramatic increases as younger American Indians, encouraged by the civil rights movement, tried to awaken white America to the injustices that were inflicted upon the modern Native Americans. In one major event, Native American youth helped to stage a series of fish-ins in the Pacific Northwest that drew pronounced media attention toward violations of treaty-granted rights fish  Another dramatic event of the decade was the 18-month occupation of Alcatraz islands by the Indians of All Tribes. Alcatraz made Indian causes highly visible for the next several years and contributed to the era of red power. Red power is another term for the modern Native American rights movement.
  • 5. 1970s  In the 1970s, sovereignty became the chief rallying cry for Native American activists. One movement was the American Indian Movement which was led by Dennis Banks, John Trudell, and Russell Means, which gave young, militant Indians a voice. AIM's takeover of the Bureau of Indian Affairs headquarters in Washington D.C., the cross-country protest called the Trail of Broken Treaties, and finally the violent standoff with federal troops at Wounded Knee, South Dakota in 1973 all contributed to the intensification of the scrutiny of Native American activists.
  • 6. Recent Years  In recent years, Native American activists have continued to focus on land and other treaty rights. However, they have also broadened their horizons and now include movements for environmental, defamation, and economic issues.
  • 7. Winona LaDuke  Activist Winona LaDuke has launched a fight against the dumping of toxic and nuclear wastes on reservations.