Gender Mainstreaming in Forest
Governance: Lessons from Asia1
Yanti (T) Kusumanto,2 Bhawana Upadhyay,3 and Ratchada Arporn...
What did we do?
1. Looked critically
 How gender mainstreaming in forest governance has been carried out, with
 what ach...
Gender mainstreaming as defined by UN
and deployed by member states
Gender mainstreaming is a strategy for
making women’s ...
© RECOFTC
Examples of gender gaps related
to agriculture and forestry
Worldwide, 80 percent of unpaid
collection of fuel ...
1. Adopting the terminology of gender equality and gender
mainstreaming;
2. Putting a gender mainstreaming policy into pla...
Elaboration of above conclusion
Majority of gender
mainstreaming forestry policies
use an integrationist approach.
Only ...
Suggestions to overcome the challenges
Gender mainstreaming in forest governance should be made more
transformatory —i.e....
Change agents within government are important: gender-sensitivity among
government staff on the ground should be develope...
‘If the village committee convenes
a meeting on community forest,
I will always be there as
I am a primary user of the for...
Terima kasih, Dhanyabad, Kòp Kun!
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Presentn_GenderMainstreamingAsia_Yanti(T)Kusumanto_Oct15

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Presentn_GenderMainstreamingAsia_Yanti(T)Kusumanto_Oct15

  • 1. Gender Mainstreaming in Forest Governance: Lessons from Asia1 Yanti (T) Kusumanto,2 Bhawana Upadhyay,3 and Ratchada Arpornsilp4 Paper presented at Bandung+60 Asian-African Conference Gender Seminar Trisakti University, Jakarta, 30 October 2015 1Based on ‘Gender Mainstreaming into Forest Policies in Asia and the Pacific’, a Project commissioned by FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok (2013) 2 TYK research & action consulting 3RECOFTC (The Center for People and Forests) 4RECOFTC
  • 2. What did we do? 1. Looked critically  How gender mainstreaming in forest governance has been carried out, with  what achievements, and  what lessons learned. 2. Identified opportunities to make gender mainstreaming more effective and suggested ways to overcome challenges. How did we do it?  Policy analyses (based on review of policy documents pertaining to forest policies (laws, regulations, decrees, forest sector plans etc.; and interviews of key informants)  Context analysis (based on literature review, interviews of secondary informants, FGDs, and direct observations during field visits).
  • 3. Gender mainstreaming as defined by UN and deployed by member states Gender mainstreaming is a strategy for making women’s as well as men’s concerns and experiences an integral dimension of the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies and programmes in all political, economic and societal spheres so that women and men benefit equally and inequality is not perpetuated. The ultimate goal is to achieve gender equality. ECOSOC 1997
  • 4. © RECOFTC Examples of gender gaps related to agriculture and forestry Worldwide, 80 percent of unpaid collection of fuel wood is done by women and girls In Asia-Pacific, the number of women engaged in part-time, unpaid wood fuel and charcoal production is about five times the number of men. The number of men employed in full-time, paid wood fuel and charcoal production is more than ten times that of women In every region of the world, women own on average 19 percent of landholdings, much less than men Female professional staff in public forestry institutions in Asia-Pacific account for almost 15 percent on average of the total professional staff. In the Global South, the livelihoods of about 1.25 billion people are closely connected to forests. About half of them are women and girls. Despite introduction of gender mainstreaming as strategy worldwide, there are pertinent gender gaps associated with forests all over the place.
  • 5. 1. Adopting the terminology of gender equality and gender mainstreaming; 2. Putting a gender mainstreaming policy into place; 3. Implementing gender mainstreaming. Resulting in the conclusion that overall gender mainstreaming in forest governance in Nepal is the most progressive, Thailand the least. Progress in gender mainstreaming is categorised in three stages (following Moser 2005):
  • 6. Elaboration of above conclusion Majority of gender mainstreaming forestry policies use an integrationist approach. Only a minority of the policies are focused to genuinely empower women (and more of such policies are to be found in Nepal than in the other two countries). There has been more attention to institutional activities of gender mainstreaming, rather than operational activities. © RECOFTC
  • 7. Suggestions to overcome the challenges Gender mainstreaming in forest governance should be made more transformatory —i.e. aiming to transform the existing or dominant development agenda.  Such a transformation starts with gender analysis, yet one which develops understanding of gender relations that intersect with other relations of race, ethnicity, religion etc., creating knowledge about context-specific locations of inequality. Gender mainstreaming in forest governance should be grounded on gender analysis into work being done already, and undertake standalone work to address particular issues of strategic importance to women. ©T. Kusumanto
  • 8. Change agents within government are important: gender-sensitivity among government staff on the ground should be developed by having them adopt a nuance understanding of the multiple factors which contribute to women’s lack of choices and marginalisation.  These points are necessary for shaping an agenda-setting gender main- streaming (following Jahan 2005), transforming women’s lives and societies.
  • 9. ‘If the village committee convenes a meeting on community forest, I will always be there as I am a primary user of the forest and know many things about forests and their resources. The forest is a source of life and we want to keep it intact.’ Mrs. Ratchanee Ban Thung Yao village, Northern Thailand
  • 10. Terima kasih, Dhanyabad, Kòp Kun!

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