Let’s discuss about
it ….
A nasal consonant is a type of consonant produced
with a lowered velum in the mouth where air comes
out through the nose b...
The three types of closure are
:
1. Bilabial (lips)
2. Alveolar (tongue blade
against alveolar ridge)
3. Velar (back of to...
They are called laterals since, during their
production,
The back of the tongue makes contact with the
hard palate while t...
There are two distinct types of lateral :
1. Lateral Ficatives, where the articulation, requiring
a great deal muscular te...
 This consonant is important in that
considerable differences in its articulation
and its distribution are found in diffe...
What makes rhotics so difficult to learn
is its variation across languages. The
sound "r" can be produced in Spanish as
a ...
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
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Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki

Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nasals and other consonants group 1 marissa & zuki

  • 1. Let’s discuss about it ….
  • 2. A nasal consonant is a type of consonant produced with a lowered velum in the mouth where air comes out through the nose but not through the mouth, it is prevented by a complete closure in the mouth at some point. The basic characteristic of a nasal consonants is that the air escapes through the nose. The nasal consonants in English are [n] [m], and [ŋ], as in nose, mouth and ring.
  • 3. The three types of closure are : 1. Bilabial (lips) 2. Alveolar (tongue blade against alveolar ridge) 3. Velar (back of tongue against the soft palate)c
  • 4. They are called laterals since, during their production, The back of the tongue makes contact with the hard palate while the front of the tongue sinks down, channeling the air laterally around the tongue, down the side (or something both sides) of the mouth.
  • 5. There are two distinct types of lateral : 1. Lateral Ficatives, where the articulation, requiring a great deal muscular tension resembles that of the fricatives (except for the position of the tongue. 1. Non Fricative Lateral, often calledliquids, whose articulation is very close to the spirant.
  • 6.  This consonant is important in that considerable differences in its articulation and its distribution are found in different accents of English.  Rhotics - sounds that are produced when the character "r" is written - are some of the most difficult sounds to learn when studying a second language. These sounds are the trills, the central approximants, the taps, the flaps, and the fricatives of phonetics. If this list of phrases seems a bit daunting, take comfort: language acquisition may be a slow process but it is something that can be incredibly fruitful. After all,language is powerful.
  • 7. What makes rhotics so difficult to learn is its variation across languages. The sound "r" can be produced in Spanish as a rapid tapping of the tip of tongue on the roof of the mouth, while in English an "r" is produced by a prolonged, smooth current of air that glides over the centre of the tongue. And, in most Asian languages, such as Japanese or Korean, the use of "r" is not distinguished from its lateral approximant brother, "l".